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Headword: *)abelteroko/kkuc
Adler number: alpha,31
Translated headword: silly cuckoo
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The vacuous and silly man.[1]
Greek Original:
*)abelteroko/kkuc: o( keno\s kai\ a)be/lteros.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 32, alpha 33.
[1] Plato Comicus fr. 64 Kock = 65 K.-A. (Phrynichus 48.11). For "cuckoo" alone, in this sense, see e.g. Aristophanes, Acharnians 598 (web address 1 below), and Hesychius s.v. ko/kkuges.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; ethics; imagery; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:28:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, keywords, raised status) on 24 January 2001@22:19:23.
David Whitehead (modified translation and note) on 25 January 2001@03:48:12.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 8 October 2007@00:27:35.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 23 March 2008@01:09:06.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@01:04:18.
David Whitehead (x-refs; more keywords;) on 19 December 2011@06:48:41.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:23:30.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:55.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 1 January 2015@08:53:56.

Headword: *)abe/lteros
Adler number: alpha,32
Translated headword: thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] mindless, stupid. For the intelligent man [is] be/lteros ["thoughtful, superior"].[1]
"No, by Zeus, not the greedy and thoughtless fellow, but the mindless and conceitedly slow-witted."[2] Menander in Perinthia [writes]: "any servant who takes an idle and easy master and deceives him does not know what a great accomplishment it is to make a greater fool of one who is already thoughtless".[3] They also call a)belthri/a ["thoughtlessness"] an a)belth/rion ["thoughtless thing"]. Anaxandrides in Helen[4] [writes]: "[A:] an anchor, a little boat, - call it what vessel you want. [B:] O Heracles of the sacred precinct of thoughtlessness. [A:] But one could not estimate its size."
Also [sc. attested is] a)belthri/a, [meaning] stupidity.
Or mindlessness.
Menander [writes]: "their mind drove them to such thoughtlessness that they prayed for victory over each other rather than over the enemy."[5]
Greek Original:
*)abe/lteros: a)no/htos, a)su/netos. be/lteros ga\r o( fro/nimos. ou) ma\ *di/' ou)x o( pleone/kths kai\ a)gnw/mwn, a)ll' o( a)no/htos kai\ eu)h/qhs meta\ xauno/thtos. *me/nandros *perinqi/a|: o(/stis paralabw\n despo/thn a)pra/gmona kai\ kou=fon e)capata=| qera/pwn, ou)k oi)=d' o(/ ti ou(=tos megalei=o/n e)sti diapepragme/nos, e)pabelterw/sas to/n pote a)be/lteron. le/gousi de\ kai\ a)belth/rion th\n a)belthri/an. *)alecandri/dhs *(ele/nh|: a)/gkura, le/mbos, skeu=os o(/ ti bou/lei le/ge. w)= *(hra/kleis a)belthri/ou temenikou=. a)ll' ou)d' a)\n ei)pei=n to\ me/geqos du/naito/ tis. kai\ *)abelthri/a, h( a)frosu/nh. h)\ a)nohsi/a. *me/nandros: ei)s tou=to de\ a)belthri/as h)/lasen au)toi=s o( nou=s, w(/ste qa/teron me/ros th\n kata\ qate/rou ma=llon h)\ th\n kata\ tw=n polemi/wn eu)/xesqai ni/khn.
Notes:
On this headword, a comic formation literally meaning non-superior, see generally LSJ s.v. (web address 1 below); and cf. alpha 31, alpha 33.
[1] These glosses are paralleled in a variety of other lexica (and in the scholia to Aristophanes, Clouds 1201 and Ecclesiazusae 768).
[2] Quotation (an illustration of the first of the glossing words, not the headword) unidentifiable; also in Photius and Aelius Dionysius.
[3] Menander fr. 393 Kock.
[4] Anaxandrides [see generally alpha 1982] fr. 12 Kock (and K.-A.). But note that Adler prints the manuscript reading "Alexandrides", on the strength of the (apparent) mention of such a playwright in alpha 3824. On the emendation to Anaxandrides, see Toup vol. 1 p. 9; Adler attributes the emendation to 'Iunius' (probably Adriaan de Jonghe, 1511-1575, author of a Greek/Latin Lexicon).
[5] Not M. the comic poet, quoted above, but the C6 CE historian Menander Protector [mu 591]: his fr. 28 Blockley.
Reference:
Toup, Jonathan, and Richard Porson. Emendationes in Suidam Et Hesychium, Et Alios Lexicographos Graecos. Oxford 1790
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; military affairs; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:02:21.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; added keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@05:52:19.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 23 March 2008@13:05:56.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@04:34:27.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@11:17:06.
Catharine Roth (fixed note number, augmented note, added bibliography, tweaked link) on 15 May 2008@15:34:15.
David Whitehead (typo) on 16 May 2008@07:55:44.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 20 May 2008@11:50:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:38:00.
David Whitehead (updated a reference; cosmetics) on 3 January 2012@04:21:06.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 22 December 2014@04:27:32.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@09:15:50.

Headword: *)abelterw/tatoi
Adler number: alpha,33
Translated headword: most thoughtless, very thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Aristophanes [writes]: "before this most/very thoughtless men used to sit gaping -- Dolts, Half-wits".[1]
Greek Original:
*)abelterw/tatoi: *)aristofa/nhs: te/ws d' a)belterw/tatoi kexhno/tes *mamma/kuqoi *meliti/dai ka/qhntai.
Notes:
(Entry lacking, Adler reports, in ms S.)
Masculine nominative plural of this superlative, evidently from the quotation given. See also alpha 31, alpha 32.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 989-991 (web address 1), quoted also at beta 468 and mu 121. The other two terms used here (each of them apparently stemming from a proper name) stand at least as much in need of glossing as does this adjective: see Dover (below) 315-16. For the formation of the adjective, see also the entry in LSJ s.v. (web address 2 below).
Reference:
Aristophanes, Frogs, edited with introduction and commentary by K.J. Dover (Oxford 1993)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:03:23.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented note; added bibliography; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:29:41.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 11 January 2001@12:49:46.
William Hutton on 2 February 2001@11:46:00.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 23 March 2008@14:05:57.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@05:10:07.
Catharine Roth on 13 April 2009@13:11:48.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:29:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:25:45.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:24.
David Whitehead (another note) on 28 March 2014@06:25:35.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 April 2015@09:16:57.

Headword: *)abh/s
Adler number: alpha,38
Translated headword: stupid
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone or something] unintelligent.
Greek Original:
*)abh/s: o( a)su/netos.
Notes:
(Entry lacking, Adler reports, in ms S.)
The headword is found only in lexicographers, who seem unsure of its meaning(s): besides the above, cf. a)nai/sxuntos 'shameless' (Hesychius) and a)no/sios 'unholy' (Hesychius and the Etymologicum Gudianum).
Keywords: definition; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@18:51:47.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered translation, added keyword, set status) on 26 January 2001@23:17:19.
David Whitehead (added note) on 13 April 2004@09:52:21.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 10 October 2007@00:29:57.
David Whitehead (tweaked note) on 19 December 2011@07:02:35.
David Whitehead (another note and keyword; cosmetic) on 28 March 2014@06:27:47.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@09:19:12.

Headword: *)abi/wton
Adler number: alpha,49
Translated headword: unlivable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] bad [and] annoying, painful.[1]
"He found it an unlivable situation if he could not control the city".[2]
Also [sc. attested is the masculine] a)bi/wtos, he who is not alive.[3]
Greek Original:
*)abi/wton: kako\n a)hde\s, o)dunhro/n. o( de\ a)biw/tws ei)=xen, ei) mh\ krath/soi th=s po/lews. kai\ *)abi/wtos, o( mh\ zw=n.
Notes:
[1] Same material in other lexica; references at Photius alpha39 Theodoridis. The headword -- shown by the glossing to be neuter nominative/accusative singular rather than masculine accusative singular -- is evidently quoted from somewhere. The possibilities are numerous. (Latte on Hesychius s.v. confidently asserts Euripides, Alcestis 242.)
[2] Quotation unidentifiable -- but perhaps from Plutarch, who has several instances of the idiom a)biw/tws e)/xein.
[3] For this word see also alpha 50.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; history; politics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:01:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation, raised status) on 29 January 2001@17:14:44.
William Hutton (Added note) on 29 January 2001@17:18:16.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics; raised status) on 30 January 2001@03:39:11.
David Whitehead on 30 January 2001@03:40:51.
David Whitehead (restorative cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:57:16.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@07:44:30.
David Whitehead on 19 December 2011@07:45:11.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@05:18:15.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:43:40.

Headword: *)aboulei/
Adler number: alpha,60
Translated headword: inconsiderately, unintentionally
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] without consideration, mindlessly, ignorantly.[1]
"Though he certainly had not guessed the king's opinion, he accomplished it quite unintentionally."[2]
Greek Original:
*)aboulei/: a)bou/lws, a)fro/nws, a)maqw=s. o( de\ ou) sfo/dra stoxazo/menos th=s tou= basile/ws gnw/mhs a)boulo/tata diepra/cato.
Notes:
The headword adverb, noted for its form by grammarians, is presumably extracted from somewhere (other than the quotation given).
[1] cf. generally alpha 64.
[2] Polybius fr. 92 Büttner-Wobst. The quotation employs the superlative form of the adverb (a)boulo/tata) rendered here by 'quite unintentionally'. Although accepting the fragment himself, Büttner-Wobst notes that Dindorf maintained that this fragment cannot be genuinely Polybian, because Polybius does not use the verb diapra/casqai, except in a positive context (p. 527).
Reference:
T. Büttner-Wobst, ed., Polybii Historiae, vol. IV, (Leipzig 1904)
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:11:52.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, translation and note, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:33:11.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:17:38.
Catharine Roth (cosmetic) on 23 April 2002@11:16:43.
David Whitehead (added primary note and another hw option; more keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@08:33:31.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@10:32:52.
Ronald Allen (added bibliography, supplemented n.2) on 25 April 2018@22:49:34.
Ronald Allen (cosmeticule (bibliography)) on 4 June 2018@23:45:53.

Headword: *)/abra
Adler number: alpha,68
Translated headword: favorite
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Not simply a maidservant nor even the pretty maidservant is called [favorite], but a daughter of one of the house slaves and an honored one, whether born in the house or not. Menander in False Heracles [writes]: "the mother of these two sisters is dead. A concubine of their father's, who used to be their mother's favorite slave, is bringing them up."[1] In Sikyonian: "he bought a beloved slave instead and did not hand the slave over to his wife, but kept her apart, as is appropriate for a free woman."[2] In Faithless One: "I thought if the old man got the gold, he'd get himself a favorite slave right away."[3]
Iamblichus [writes]: "since this was difficult and something of a rarity, with the [woman] housekeeper on guard and another favorite slave-woman also present, he persuades the daughter to run away without her parents' knowledge."[4]
Greek Original:
*)/abra: ou)/te a(plw=s qera/paina ou)/te h( eu)/morfos qera/paina le/getai, a)ll' oi)ko/triy gunaiko\s ko/rh kai\ e)/ntimos, ei)/te oi)kogenh\s ei)/te mh/. *me/nandros *yeudhraklei=: mh/thr te/qnhke tai=n a)delfai=n tai=n duei=n tau/tain. tre/fei de\ pallakh/ tis tou= patro\s au)ta\s, a)/bra th=s mhtro\s au)tw=n genome/nh. *sikuwni/w|: kai\ a)/bran ga\r a)ntwnou/menos e)rwme/nhn, tau/th| me\n ou) pare/dwk' e)/xein, tre/fein de\ xwri\s, w(s e)leuqe/ra| pre/pei. *)api/stw|: w)/mhn ei) to\ xrusi/on la/boi o( ge/rwn, qera/painan eu)qu\s h)gorasme/nhn a)/bran e)/sesqai. *)ia/mblixos: e)pei\ de\ tou=to xalepo\n h)=n kai\ spa/nio/n ti to\ th=s oi)kourou= fulattou/shs kai\ a)/bras tino\s a)/llhs sumparou/shs, a)napei/qei th\n ko/rhn laqou=san tou\s gonei=s a)podra=nai.
Notes:
The main part of this entry is also in Photius, Lexicon alpha50 Theodoridis (where the headword is plural); similar material in other lexica.
LSJ uses the rough breathing (a(/bra) for the word it defines specifically as 'favorite slave'. See web address 1 below.
[1] Menander fr. 520 Kock, 453 K.-Th., 411 K.-A.
[2] Menander fr. 438 Kock (1 Sandbach).
[3] Menander fr. 64 Kock, 58 K.-Th., 63 K.-A.
[4] Iamblichus, Babyloniaca fr. 56 Habrich.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; gender and sexuality; philosophy; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:13:15.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:59:03.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added link) on 30 January 2001@23:04:27.
David Whitehead (added keyword) on 31 January 2001@04:33:38.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 24 April 2002@03:20:49.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 15 August 2007@10:03:18.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:26:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:03:54.
David Whitehead (updated refs) on 16 August 2013@07:04:59.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@03:49:04.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@06:54:57.

Headword: *(abra\ bai/nwn
Adler number: alpha,70
Translated headword: walking delicately
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] being conceited, being indolent.[1]
"Walking truly delicately, that fellow seemed to be holding his eyebrows up in the air."[2]
Greek Original:
*(abra\ bai/nwn: qrupto/menos, blakeuo/menos. e)kei=nos o)/ntws a(bra\ bai/nwn e)do/kei e)/xwn ta\s o)fru=s u(perhrme/nas a)/nw.
Notes:
See generally LSJ s.v. a(bro/s (web address 1).
[1] The headword phrase has the same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha49 Theodoridis. It could be extracted from the quotation given, but is more likely to be quoted from Euripides, Trojan Women 820. (So Latte on Hesychius s.v. and more tentatively Theodoridis on Photius s.v.)
[2] Quotation (transmitted, in Adler's view, via the Excerpta Constantini Porphyrogeniti) unidentifiable.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:27:05.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set status) on 30 January 2001@23:11:22.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added note; cosmetics) on 31 January 2001@04:28:51.
Jennifer Benedict (added links) on 25 March 2008@11:53:43.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@03:49:27.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@09:07:56.
David Whitehead (modified notes) on 1 February 2012@05:31:39.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 12 August 2013@22:35:19.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:07:06.
Catharine Roth (typo, coding) on 14 February 2015@10:46:33.
David Whitehead (expanded a note) on 2 April 2015@10:36:52.

Headword: *)abro/mios
Adler number: alpha,84
Translated headword: Bromios-less, Bromius-less
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] without wine.
"If I escape through the wave of destructive fire, I tell you I will drink for one hundred suns from dewy streams, Bromios-less[1] and wine-less." In the Epigrams.[2]
Greek Original:
*)abro/mios: xwri\s oi)/nou. h)\n o)loou= dia\ ku=ma fu/gw puro\s, ei)s e(kato/n soi h)eli/ous drosera=n pi/omai e)k liba/dwn, a)bro/mios kai\ a)/oinos. e)n *)epigra/mmasin.
Notes:
The headword is presumably extracted from the epigram quoted, its only attestation outside lexicography.
[1] Bromios is a name frequently given to Dionysos (delta 1185): see beta 547.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.291.3-5 (author unknown), the vow of a wine-loving woman, should her fever break; cf. Gow and Page (vol. I, 74-77), mu 1022, and sigma 955. This epigram appears twice in the Anthologia Palatina (AP). In the first instance, it is attributed to Antipater of Thessalonica. But in the second instance (inserted after 9.164), and following redaction by the AP scribe designated C (the Corrector), it is noted to be a)de/spoton, anonymous (ibid. and vol. II, 100-101)
References:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. II, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: definition; ethics; food; imagery; medicine; poetry; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:37:23.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, added note and keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@09:40:10.
David Whitehead (modified headword; tweaked translation; x-refs; cosmetics) on 3 January 2005@10:37:13.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 20 December 2011@04:12:25.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 21 December 2011@01:49:18.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@11:06:04.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.2, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keywords) on 23 October 2018@18:32:39.
Ronald Allen (typo n.2 second cross-reference) on 23 October 2018@18:40:26.
Ronald Allen (corrected epigram attribution in n.2, added bibliography entry) on 29 October 2018@13:29:47.

Headword: *(abro/n
Adler number: alpha,86
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In Herodotus [sc. this means something] beautiful, stubborn, awe-inspiring, dainty.
Greek Original:
*(abro/n: para\ *(hrodo/tw| kalo\n, au)/qades, semno\n, trufero/n.
Note:
The headword adjective is neuter nominative (and accusative) singular of alpha 87 (and cf. alpha 88), extracted here from Herodotus 1.71.4 (web address 1), and accompanied by ancient glosses on that passage. In fact, 'luxurious' or 'soft-living' would be more appropriate; cf. a(bro/tatoi in 4.104 (web address 2), and Powell s.v.
Reference:
J.E. Powell, A Lexicon to Herodotus. Hildesheim: George Olms 1977
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:38:32.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, augmented note, added bibliography and keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@09:51:15.
William Hutton (Modified my own note, added links) on 1 February 2001@14:00:33.
David Whitehead (modified note; cosmetics) on 5 February 2003@09:50:33.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 December 2011@09:37:09.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 21 December 2011@01:53:17.

Headword: *(abro/s
Adler number: alpha,87
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] bright, delicate, tender.[1]
In the Epigrams: "a cicada sat above a cithara delicately murmuring."[2]
"All the same that fellow is dainty and delicate and weakened by the softness of his body and depraved and with his hair done up like the most licentious little courtesans. And when he goes in to see the king his face and his curly hair are always delicately dripping [with perfume], and he takes as much money from the communal difficulties as would satisfy even the legendary Midas."[3]
Greek Original:
*(abro/s: lampro\s, trufero\s, a(palo/s. e)n *)epigra/mmasin: a(bro\n e)pitru/zwn kiqa/ras u(/per e(/zeto te/ttic. o(/mws de\ o( trufero\s e)kei=nos kai\ a(bro\s kai\ u(po\ malaki/as tou= sw/matos kateagw\s kai\ lelugisme/nos kai\ ta/s te ko/mas a)nadou/menos, w(/sper ai( tw=n e(tairi/dwn a)selge/sterai, kai\ a(brostage\s e)/xwn a)ei\ to\ me/twpon kai\ tou\s bostru/xous, labw\n xrusi/on e)k tw=n koinw=n sumforw=n, o(/son i(kano\n h)=n e)mplh=sai kai\ to\n e)k tou= mu/qou *mi/dan, ei)se/rrei pro\s to\n basile/a.
Notes:
For this adjective see already alpha alpha 73 and alpha 86, and again alpha 88.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha55 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.54.7 (Paulus Silentarius).
[3] Attributed by Hemsterhuys to Eunapius; again (in part) at alpha 1860.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; imagery; mythology; poetry; women; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:39:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@12:21:50.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:35:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 January 2006@10:26:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@04:35:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 December 2011@19:16:16.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:18:56.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:31:02.

Headword: *(abro/teron
Adler number: alpha,91
Translated headword: more delicately
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"But they behaved more delicately than them and were full of Sybaris."
Greek Original:
*(abro/teron: a)ll' a(bro/teron au)tw=n ei)=xon kai\ *suba/ridos mestoi\ h)=san.
Notes:
Philostratus, Life of Apollonius of Tyana 4.27 (here illustrating the use of the neuter adjective as adverb; cf. already alpha 70).
See also alpha 86, alpha 87, alpha 88.
For the use of the toponym Sybaris in this way cf. sigma 1271, and see generally LSJ s.v. and OCD s.v.
Keywords: dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; geography; imagery; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:42:22.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; augmented note; added keyword) on 2 February 2001@03:29:56.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@11:58:23.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@03:58:52.
David Whitehead (x-refs; more keywords) on 21 December 2011@06:05:07.
Catharine Roth (deleted link) on 22 December 2011@19:21:32.

Headword: *(abru/netai
Adler number: alpha,99
Translated headword: puts on airs
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] adorns oneself, is conceited, is boastful.
Greek Original:
*(abru/netai: kosmei=tai, qru/ptetai, kauxa=tai.
Note:
Same or similar entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha61 Theodoridis. This is comment, presumably, on one of the famous appearances of the headword in Attic tragedy: Aeschylus, Agamemnon 1205 (web address 1); Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus 1339 (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:48:03.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keyword and status) on 1 February 2001@23:04:11.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 27 February 2003@09:04:25.
Jennifer Benedict (added links and title tags) on 25 March 2008@12:05:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 26 March 2008@04:00:14.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 21 December 2011@06:47:48.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:29:27.
Catharine Roth (tweaked links) on 15 February 2017@01:28:24.

Headword: *)abudhno\n e)pifo/rhma
Adler number: alpha,100
Translated headword: Abydene dessert, Abudene dessert
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Whenever something unpleasant happens as a result of someone having shown up at the wrong time, we are accustomed to call it an "Abydene dessert." This is because the people of Abydos,[1] whenever they entertain a fellow-citizen or a foreigner, bring their children around to be admired after the ointments and the crowns. Those in attendance are disturbed by both the nurses clamoring and the children screaming. Hence it has become customary to say the foregoing.[2]
Greek Original:
*)abudhno\n e)pifo/rhma: o(/tan a)kai/rws tino\s e)pifane/ntos a)hdi/a tis h)=|, ei)w/qamen le/gein *)abudhno\n e)pifo/rhma. dia\ to\ tou\s *)abudhnou\s, o(/tan tina\ tw=n politw=n h)\ ce/nwn e(stiw=si, meta\ to\ mu/ron kai\ tou\s stefa/nous ta\ paidi/a perife/rein filhqhso/mena. tw=n te tiqhnw=n qorubousw=n tw=n te paidi/wn kekrago/twn e)noxlei=sqai tou\s paro/ntas. a)f' ou(= ei)/qistai le/gein to\ prokei/menon.
Notes:
[1] A city on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont: see alpha 101.
[2] See also Zenobius 1.4 and other paroemiographers. For a different explanation (involving taxes and harbor dues) see Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 14.641A [14.47 Kaibel], citing Aristeides, On Proverbs.
Keywords: aetiology; children; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; ethics; food; geography; imagery; proverbs; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:00:52.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@22:59:16.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added note) on 11 January 2001@07:21:18.
David Whitehead (added another note) on 11 January 2001@07:58:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 16 November 2005@07:49:41.
Jennifer Benedict (title tags, cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@23:59:40.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 21 December 2011@06:54:39.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:30:33.
David Whitehead (tweaked a ref) on 14 January 2015@03:15:50.

Headword: *)/abudos
Adler number: alpha,101
Translated headword: Abudos, Abydos, Abydus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A city.[1]
The word is applied to an informant [sukofa/nths] because of the common belief that the people of Abudos were informers.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] an adverb, *)abudo/qi, [meaning] in Abudos.[3]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] *a)/budon fluari/an ["Abudos nonsense"], [meaning] great [nonsense].[4]
And [sc. attested is] *)abudhno\s, [meaning] he [who comes] from Abudos.[5]
Greek Original:
*)/abudos: po/lis. e)pi\ sukofa/ntou ta/ttetai h( le/cis, dia\ to\ dokei=n sukofa/ntas ei)=nai tou\s *)abudhnou/s. kai\ e)pi/rrhma, *)abudo/qi, e)n *)abu/dw|. kai\ *)/abudon fluari/an, th\n pollh/n. kai\ *)abudhno\s, o( a)po\ *)abu/dou.
Notes:
[1] = Lexicon Ambrosianum 82, according to Adler. In fact two cities of this name are known: one on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid G4; present-day Maltepe) and Abydos/Ebot in Upper Egypt (Barrington Atlas map 77 grid F4); without much doubt, the former is meant here. (In Hesychius alpha23 the gloss is fuller -- 'a Trojan city of the Hellespont'. Latte regards the entry as prompted by Homer, Iliad 2.836, accusative case, although similar wording appears in a late scholion to Iliad 17.584, where the adverbial derivative a)budo/qi appears -- see n. 3 below). See also alpha 100, sigma 465, and generally OCD(4) s.v.
[2] = the first sentence of Pausanias the Atticist alpha3 and Photius alpha63 Theodoridis; cf. also Zenobius 1.1, s.v. *)abudhno\n e)pifo/rhma (alpha 100), and Kassel-Austin, PCG III.2 p.376 on Aristophanes fr. 755. See generally sigma 1330, sigma 1331, sigma 1332.
[3] Probably from commentary to Homer, Iliad 17.584, the only literary attestation of this adverb prior to Musaeus Grammaticus (5/6 CE); cf. Apollonius Dyscolus On Adverbs 2.1.1.164.
[4] = Synagoge Codex B alpha44, but in the better mss of Photius (Lexicon alpha64 Theodoridis) the adjective (in a nominative-case entry) is a)/buqos ('bottomless'), surely correctly; cf. alpha 104. The ultimate source may be Plato, Parmenides 130D, though there too the text is uncertain: perhaps ei)/s tin' a)/buqon fluari/an (web address 1), though the alternatives include ei)/s tina bu=qon fluari/as. On the adjective a)/buqos, a synonym for a)/bussos, see the LSJ entry at web address 2.
[5] There are many literary attestations of this form of the ethnic adjective (nominative singular masculine), beginning with Herodotus 4.138. For an instance in the Suda see pi 71.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; geography; law; philosophy; proverbs
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@13:59:06.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@21:07:09.
Ross Scaife ✝ (fixed keywords) on 2 March 2000@17:48:48.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; replaced existing note; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:05:35.
Jennifer Benedict (added links, betacode fix, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:03:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 18 April 2011@14:40:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 25 April 2011@04:09:51.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@09:19:59.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1) on 1 February 2012@05:52:37.
David Whitehead (expansions to notes) on 16 August 2013@07:33:01.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 4 July 2014@08:19:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:21:46.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:35:15.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 22 December 2014@09:26:49.

Headword: *)aga/zw>20: genikh=|
Adler number: alpha,107
Translated headword: I exalt overmuch
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Used] with a genitive.
Greek Original:
*)aga/zw: genikh=|.
Note:
= Lexica Segueriana (Bekker) 121.30 (= alpha25 Petrova). This form of the verb (present indicative active first person singular) is unattested outside lexicography and grammars, and is probably a generic lexical reference. In general the verb appears far more frequently in the middle and aorist passive (usually with middle sense). The active and middle forms of this verb do not govern the genitive case in classical usage, although there is one example of the aorist passive doing so in Plato Parmenides 135E, which may be the ultimate inspiration for this comment (as it probably also is for Libanius (Epistles 826.2, 1156.1, and 1279.1) and other later authors). In Byzantine Greek one occasionally finds the middle voice governing the genitive; e.g. Macrembolites Hysmine and Hysminias 11.23. For the LSJ entry, which cites Aeschylus and Sophocles for the accusative, see web address 1 below.
Reference:
D. Petrova, Das Lexicon Über die Syntax: Untersuchung und kritische Ausgabe des Lexikons im Codex Paris. Coisl. gr. 345 (Serta Graeca 25; Wiesbaden, 2006).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; philosophy
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 6 October 1999@11:00:05.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@08:53:55.
Catharine Roth (raised status) on 28 August 2003@17:25:21.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:18:32.
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:16:07.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@03:58:20.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 16 June 2013@08:45:14.
William Hutton (augmented note, added keyword) on 4 July 2014@09:03:42.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 4 July 2014@19:30:36.

Headword: *)agaqa/
Adler number: alpha,108
Translated headword: goods, goodies
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Xenophon used the word of foodstuffs and drinks which bring enjoyment and good cheer.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Good Things Kilikon" - with "has" omitted. Kilikon [is] a proper name. He was wealthy.[2]
Greek Original:
*)agaqa/: e)pi\ tw=n pro\s a)po/lausin kai\ eu)wxi/an siti/wn kai\ potw=n e)xrh/sato *cenofw=n th=| le/cei. kai\ *)agaqa\ *kili/kwn, lei/pei to\ e)/xei. *kili/kwn de\ o)/noma ku/rion. eu)/poros de\ h)=n.
Notes:
[1] Xenophon, Anabasis 4.4.9 (web address 1 below).
[2] This is only one possible explanation of the proverbial phrase. For another, probably better one - with another version of the name (Killikon: apparently authentic, as it derives from Aristophanes, Peace 363 [web address 2 below]) - see kappa 1610; but note also kappa 223 and pi 2040 on "Kallikon".
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: aetiology; biography; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; food; historiography; proverbs
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:14:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added links, set status) on 8 June 2001@01:15:16.
David Whitehead (added keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:00:27.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:19:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:18:17.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 22 December 2011@03:59:55.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 23 December 2011@18:41:14.

Headword: *)agaqoergi/a
Adler number: alpha,114
Translated headword: beneficence
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Damascius [writes]: "to sum everything up in one word, what Pythagoras said about man being very similar to the divine is something that he [Isidore] clearly demonstrated in his deeds: his beneficent zeal and the generosity that he extended to everybody, but especially the elevation of souls from the manifold evil that weighs them down, and also the deliverance of bodies from unjust and unholy suffering;[1] and moreover a third thing: he took care of external matters as much as he was able."[2]
Greek Original:
*)agaqoergi/a. *dama/skios: w(s de\ e(ni\ lo/gw| to\ pa=n sullabei=n, o(/per e)/fh o( *puqago/ras o(moio/taton e)/xein tw=| qew=| to\n a)/nqrwpon, tou=to safw=s e)pi\ tw=n e)/rgwn au)to\s e)pedei/knuto, th\n a)gaqoergo\n proqumi/an kai\ th\n e)s pa/ntas e)pekteinome/nhn eu)ergesi/an, ma/lista me\n th\n a)nagwgh\n tw=n yuxw=n a)po\ th=s ka/tw briqou/shs pantoi/as kaki/as: e)/peita kai\ th\n swth/rion tw=n swma/twn e)k th=s a)di/kou h)\ a)nosi/ou talaipwri/as: to\ d' au)= tri/ton, e)pemelei=to tw=n e)/cw pragma/twn, o(/sh du/namis.
Notes:
[1] "No doubt at the hands of the civil authorities or of the Christians" (Athanassiadi).
[2] Damascius fr.24 Zintzen (237 Asmus, 26B Athanassiadi).
Keywords: biography; Christianity; ethics; philosophy; religion
Translated by: William Hutton on 31 March 2001@09:53:52.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added note) on 7 March 2002@12:06:23.
David Whitehead (augmented note) on 17 February 2003@05:46:10.
Catharine Roth (augmented notes) on 15 May 2003@21:17:36.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@07:58:53.
Catharine Roth (added keyword) on 22 November 2005@11:30:01.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@04:57:53.

Headword: *)agaqoergoi/
Adler number: alpha,115
Translated headword: agathoergoi, benefactors
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Men selected according to valor.
From the Ephors.[1]
Greek Original:
*)agaqoergoi/: ai(retoi\ kat' a)ndragaqi/an. e)k tw=n *)efo/rwn.
Notes:
This is the name for a select group of Spartan elders. According to Herodotus (1.67.5: web address 1) five were selected each year from the eldest members of the cavalry, not from the ephors.
[1] Adler called these final three words locus dubius, and capitalized, as here, the word Ephors. For a speculative argument that this phrase should actually read "from the [sc. writings] of Ephoros", see D. Whitehead, 'Ephorus(?) on the Spartan constitution', Classical Quarterly n.s. 55 (2005) 299-301. [The suggestion has been taken up in Brill's New Jacoby s.v. Ephorus, by Victor Parker. However, the evidential basis for it is illusory, according to I.C. Cunningham, CQ n.s. 61 (2011) 312-314.]
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; ethics; geography; historiography; history; law; military affairs
Translated by: William Hutton on 31 March 2001@23:24:43.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword) on 2 April 2001@03:36:30.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 17 June 2005@09:32:07.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 25 May 2011@06:46:44.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 25 May 2011@11:04:04.
David Whitehead (expanded note; more keywords; cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:04:44.

Headword: *)agaqoqe/leia
Adler number: alpha,116
Translated headword: desire for the good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the choice of good things.[1]
"When it comes to getting things done a desire for the good alone does not suffice; there is also a need for strength and perseverence."[2]
Greek Original:
*)agaqoqe/leia: h( tw=n a)gaqw=n e)klogh/. ou)k a)rkei= toi=s pra/gmasin h( a)gaqoqe/leia mo/non, a)lla\ dei= kai\ r(w/mhs kai\ e)pistrefei/as.
Notes:
[1] The headword (a single word in the Greek) is a very rare feminine noun. It is glossed with this same phrase in the parallel entry in ps.-Zonaras.
[2] 'Anon.': LSJ s.v. Perhaps Polybius, according to Adler. But suggested as a fragment of Damascius by Asmus (fr. 20), and accepted as such by Zintzen (fr. 25) and Athanassiadi (fr. 158).
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; philosophy
Translated by: William Hutton on 31 March 2001@23:33:22.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@03:16:20.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 6 February 2003@00:06:33.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@07:59:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:13:57.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 4 April 2015@09:11:44.

Headword: *)agaqou= *dai/monos
Adler number: alpha,122
Translated headword: of the Good Spirit
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The ancients had a custom after dinner of drinking 'of the Good Spirit', by taking an extra quaff of unmixed [wine]; and they call this 'of the Good Spirit',[1] but when they are ready to depart, 'of Zeus the Savior'. And this is what they called the second [day] of the month.[2] But there was also in Thebes a hero-shrine of the Good Spirit.
But others say that the first drinking vessel was called this.[3]
Aristotle composed a book On the Good in which he delineated the unwritten doctrines of Plato. Aristotle mentions the composition in the first [book] of On the Soul, calling it On Philosophy.[4]
Greek Original:
*)agaqou= *dai/monos: e)/qos ei)=xon oi( palaioi\ meta\ to\ dei=pnon pi/nein *)agaqou= *dai/monos, e)pirrofou=ntes a)/kraton, kai\ tou=to le/gein *)agaqou= *dai/monos, xwri/zesqai de\ me/llontes, *dio\s *swth=ros. kai\ h(me/ran de\ th\n deute/ran tou= mhno\s ou(/tws e)ka/loun. kai\ e)n *qh/bais de\ h)=n h(rw=|on *)agaqou= *dai/monos. a)/lloi de/ fasi to\ prw=ton poth/rion ou(/tw le/gesqai. o(/ti peri\ ta)gaqou= bibli/on sunta/cas *)aristote/lhs, ta\s a)gra/fous tou= *pla/twnos do/cas e)n au)tw=| katata/ttei. kai\ me/mnhtai tou= sunta/gmatos *)aristote/lhs e)n tw=| prw/tw| peri\ yuxh=s, e)ponoma/zwn au)to\ peri\ filosofi/as.
Notes:
The first paragraph here is paralleled (in general terms) in Photius and other lexica, and also in the scholia to Aristophanes, Peace 300, where this genitive-case phrase occurs.
See also alpha 966.
[1] cf. Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 15.675B-C (15.17 Kaibel), where the G.S. is equated, not necessarily correctly, with Dionysos.
[2] cf. Hesychius s.v., and see generally J.D. Mikalson, The Sacred and Civil Calendar of the Athenian Year (Princeton 1975) 15 for this and other evidence and modern discussion (not confined to Athens).
[3] From alpha 966.
[4] Aristotle, de anima 404b19; cf. Alexander of Aphrodisias, Commentaries on Aristotle's Topics 75.32-35.
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; food; geography; philosophy; religion
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:18:44.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@03:46:05.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@07:23:37.

Headword: *)agaqw=n a)gaqi/des
Adler number: alpha,123
Translated headword: skeins of good things
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The proverb is used in the comic poets in reference to a lot of good things.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] 'sea of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] 'anthills of good things', in reference to an abundance of good fortune.[3]
Also [sc. attested is] 'heap of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things and a lot of good fortune.[4]
Greek Original:
*)agaqw=n a)gaqi/des: ta/ttetai h( paroimi/a para\ toi=s kwmikoi=s e)pi\ tw=n pollw=n a)gaqw=n. kai\ *)agaqw=n qa/lassa, e)pi\ plh/qous a)gaqw=n. kai\ *)agaqw=n murmhki/ai, e)pi\ plh/qous eu)daimoni/as. kai\ *)agaqw=n swro\s, e)pi\ plh/qous a)gaqw=n kai\ pollh=s eu)daimoni/as.
Notes:
The wordplay of the headword phrase a)gaqw=n a)gaqi/des is hard to render in English. 'Bundles of bounties' might do.
[1] (Same material in Photius.) Again at alpha 2601; and see also nu 77 and tau 147.
[2] Again at pi 2049.
[3] Comica adespota fr. 827 Kock, now 796 K.-A.
[4] cf. Apostolius 1.5, etc.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; ethics; imagery; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:28:16.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; minor cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@03:44:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:09:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:28:42.
David Whitehead (corrected a ref) on 16 March 2012@07:56:43.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 December 2014@04:31:45.
David Whitehead (coding) on 12 July 2015@03:58:05.

Headword: *)aga/qwn
Adler number: alpha,124
Translated headword: Agathon
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name. He was a tragic poet; but he was slandered for effeminacy. Aristophanes [writes]:[1] "Where is Agathon?" -- "He's gone and left me." -- "Where on earth is the wretch?" -- "At a banquet of the blessed." This Agathon was good by nature, "missed by his friends" and brilliant at the dinner table. They say also that the Symposium of Plato was set at a dinner party of his, with many philosophers introduced all together. A comic poet [sic] of the school of Socrates. He was lampooned in comedy for womanliness.
Greek Original:
*)aga/qwn: o)/noma ku/rion. tragiko\s de\ h)=n: diebe/blhto de\ e)pi\ malaki/a|. *)aristofa/nhs: *)aga/qwn de\ pou= 'stin; a)polipw/n m' oi)/xetai. poi= gh=s o( tlh/mwn; e)s maka/rwn eu)wxi/an. ou(=tos o( *)aga/qwn a)gaqo\s h)=n to\n tro/pon, poqeino\s toi=s fi/lois kai\ th\n tra/pezan lampro/s. fasi\ de\ o(/ti kai\ *pla/twnos *sumpo/sion e)n e(stia/sei au)tou= ge/graptai, pollw=n a(/ma filoso/fwn paraxqe/ntwn. kwmw|diopoio\s *swkra/tous didaskalei/ou. e)kwmw|dei=to de\ ei)s qhlu/thta.
Notes:
C5 BCE; OCD(4) s.v. (pp.37-7); TrGF 39. See also under alpha 125.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 83-85 (web address 1), with scholion; dialogue between Herakles and Dionysos. The phrase "missed by his friends", which the lexicographer uses below, is from the same source.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; ethics; food; gender and sexuality; philosophy; poetry; tragedy; women
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:48:08.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note, bibliography, keyword; cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@04:32:53.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:15:58.
Jennifer Benedict (added reference to link) on 26 March 2008@00:44:35.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:40:05.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:26:35.

Headword: *)agaqw/nios
Adler number: alpha,125
Translated headword: Agathonios, Agathonius
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name.[1]
[The man] who was king of Tartessos.[2]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Agathon's pipe-playing": the soft and relaxed [kind]; alternatively that which is neither loose nor harsh, but temperate and very sweet.[3]
Greek Original:
*)agaqw/nios: o)/noma ku/rion. o(\s e)basi/leuse th=s *tarthssou=. kai\ *)agaqw/nios au)/lhsis: h( malakh\ kai\ e)klelume/nh: h)\ h( mh/te xalara\, mh/te pikra\, a)ll' eu)/kratos kai\ h(di/sth.
Notes:
[1] Herodotus 1.163 gives it as Arganthonios (text at web address 1). See also tau 137.
[2] In southern Spain; probably the Biblical Tarshish. See generally tau 137 and OCD(4) s.v. (p.1433).
[3] Zenobius 1.2. On Agathon (an Athenian poet of the late C5 BC) and his reputation for softness see alpha 124; and on his aulos music, M.L. West, Ancient Greek Music (Oxford 1992) 354-5.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; ethics; geography; historiography; history; imagery; meter and music; proverbs; tragedy
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:33:27.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 25 April 2002@11:17:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:14:00.
Catharine Roth (cross-reference, italics, keyword) on 18 September 2006@18:09:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:42:50.
David Whitehead on 22 December 2011@07:43:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:34:58.

Headword: *)agaqoi\ d' a)rida/krues a)/ndres
Adler number: alpha,126
Translated headword: tearful men are good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In reference to those who are strongly inclined toward pity.
Greek Original:
*)agaqoi\ d' a)rida/krues a)/ndres: e)pi\ tw=n sfo/dra pro\s e)/leon r(epo/ntwn.
Note:
Same entry in Photius, and the same or very similar ones in the paroemiographers. This version of the proverb is the second half of a line of hexameter verse (complete with the particle d'); there are slight variants in (e.g.) the scholia to Homer, Iliad 1.349.
Keywords: daily life; epic; ethics; poetry; proverbs
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:57:53.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 2 April 2001@04:49:39.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@08:02:14.
David Whitehead (augmented note; another keyword) on 22 December 2011@07:50:50.

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