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Headword: Abbakoum
Adler number: alpha,12
Translated headword: Habakkuk, Avvakoum
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[A name meaning] father of awakening. For the [word] abba means father,[1] and koum means awakening.[2] So also in the Holy Gospel: "Talitha, koum," that is, "young girl, get up."[3] From which [it is] clear that Abbakoum must be written with double b.[4]
Greek Original:
Abbakoum: patêr egerseôs. to men gar abba sêmainei patêr, to de koum egersis: hôs kai para tôi theiôi euangeliôi: talêtha, koum, êgoun hê pais egeirou. hothen dêlon, hoti dia tôn duo bb grapteon to Abbakoum.
Notes:
An etymology for the name of the prophet Habakkuk (in the Septuagint, Ambakoum or Avvakoum), based on two Aramaic words found in the New Testament. The Suda is drawing from older onomastica; the same etymology is found in the Origenistic lexicon (see bibliography).
[1] See already alpha 10. The Hebrew/Aramaic אבּא abba means father.
[2] The Hebrew/Aramaic קום kūm means arise; it can also be used to mean awake.
[3] Mark 5:41 (web address 1); not in the other Gospels, but several times in patristic literature.
[4] The Suda is correct. The doubling of the בּ is indicated by its dot (dagesh); unlike Greek, Hebrew and Aramaic do not replicate doubled letters.
Reference:
Paul de Lagarde, Onomastica Sacra, p. 200, line 14-15
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: children; Christianity; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; imagery; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:59:43.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Altered wording.) on 29 July 2000@23:23:46.
Catharine Roth (Augmented note with information supplied by Lee Fields.) on 1 May 2001@19:02:40.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@10:07:42.
Raphael Finkel (Added notes 2, 4, Hebrew.) on 12 August 2004@14:47:21.
Catharine Roth (added a keyword) on 8 October 2005@00:31:59.
William Hutton (cosmetics, added keywords and link, set status) on 21 August 2007@09:59:47.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:27:14.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:23:06.
David Whitehead (another keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:27:45.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 18 December 2011@10:53:04.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@01:12:51.
Raphael Finkel (Converted Romanization of Hebrew to ISO 259.) on 7 August 2014@13:38:11.
David Whitehead (expanded a note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@08:48:00.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@06:56:57.

Headword: Abasanistos
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
Abasanistos: agumnastos ê anexetastos, adokimastos. eirêtai de apo tês basanou tês chrusochoïkês lithou, en hêi dokimazousi to chrusion. echrêsato de Ailianos en tôi peri pronoias tôi abasanistos anti tou aneu odunês.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] ba/sanos can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.

Headword: Abelterokokkux
Adler number: alpha,31
Translated headword: silly cuckoo
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The vacuous and silly man.[1]
Greek Original:
Abelterokokkux: ho kenos kai abelteros.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 32, alpha 33.
[1] Plato Comicus fr. 64 Kock = 65 K.-A. (Phrynichus 48.11). For "cuckoo" alone, in this sense, see e.g. Aristophanes, Acharnians 598 (web address 1 below), and Hesychius s.v. ko/kkuges.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; ethics; imagery; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:28:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, keywords, raised status) on 24 January 2001@22:19:23.
David Whitehead (modified translation and note) on 25 January 2001@03:48:12.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 8 October 2007@00:27:35.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 23 March 2008@01:09:06.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@01:04:18.
David Whitehead (x-refs; more keywords;) on 19 December 2011@06:48:41.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:23:30.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:55.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 1 January 2015@08:53:56.

Headword: Abolêtôr
Adler number: alpha,59
Translated headword: meeter
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Or[1] a)/bolos ["un-shedder"], a donkey that has not yet shed its teeth, from which the animal's age is known. Similarly, a young animal that does not yet have its indicators.[2] An 'indicator' is what they call a tooth that falls out, by which they verify the age. These teeth are also called 'finished,' by a metaphor from the animals themselves. The a)pognw/mones are those who have grown old and lost their indicators. Also [sc. attested is the phrase] 'unshed foals',[3] those who have not yet lost teeth.
Greek Original:
Abolêtôr kai Abolis. ê Abolos, onos ho mêdepô beblêkôs odontas, ex hou gnôrizetai hê hêlikia tou zôiou. ek de toutou ho neos oudepô gnômona echôn. gnômona de elegon ton ballomenon odonta, di' hou tas hêlikias exêtazon: ton de auton kai katêrtukota elegon, ek metaphoras tôn tetrapodôn. kai apognômonas tous apogegêrakotas, hois eleloipei to gnôrisma. kai Abolous pôlous, tous mêdepô beblêkotas odontas.
Notes:
[1] The entry has begun with two unglossed headwords, a)bolh/twr ('one who meets': LSJ -- web address 1 below) and a)/bolis (attested only here; not in LSJ).
[2] gnw/mwn; cf. gamma 347, kappa 1061.
[3] Accusative plural, evidently quoted from somewhere.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; medicine; science and technology; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:11:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, augmented notes, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:25:55.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:15:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 18 October 2005@05:37:54.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics, betacode) on 25 March 2008@11:23:51.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@11:38:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 24 August 2010@16:57:08.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:26:52.

Headword: Abromios
Adler number: alpha,84
Translated headword: Bromios-less, Bromius-less
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] without wine.
"If I escape through the wave of destructive fire, I tell you I will drink for one hundred suns from dewy streams, Bromios-less[1] and wine-less." In the Epigrams.[2]
Greek Original:
Abromios: chôris oinou. ên oloou dia kuma phugô puros, eis hekaton soi êelious droseran piomai ek libadôn, abromios kai aoinos. en Epigrammasin.
Notes:
The headword is presumably extracted from the epigram quoted, its only attestation outside lexicography.
[1] Bromios is a name frequently given to Dionysos (delta 1185): see beta 547.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.291.3-5 (author unknown), the vow of a wine-loving woman, should her fever break; cf. Gow and Page (vol. I, 74-77), mu 1022, and sigma 955. This epigram appears twice in the Anthologia Palatina (AP). In the first instance, it is attributed to Antipater of Thessalonica. But in the second instance (inserted after 9.164), and following redaction by the AP scribe designated C (the Corrector), it is noted to be a)de/spoton, anonymous (ibid. and vol. II, 100-101)
References:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. II, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: definition; ethics; food; imagery; medicine; poetry; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:37:23.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, added note and keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@09:40:10.
David Whitehead (modified headword; tweaked translation; x-refs; cosmetics) on 3 January 2005@10:37:13.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 20 December 2011@04:12:25.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 21 December 2011@01:49:18.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@11:06:04.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.2, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keywords) on 23 October 2018@18:32:39.
Ronald Allen (typo n.2 second cross-reference) on 23 October 2018@18:40:26.
Ronald Allen (corrected epigram attribution in n.2, added bibliography entry) on 29 October 2018@13:29:47.

Headword: Habros
Adler number: alpha,87
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] bright, delicate, tender.[1]
In the Epigrams: "a cicada sat above a cithara delicately murmuring."[2]
"All the same that fellow is dainty and delicate and weakened by the softness of his body and depraved and with his hair done up like the most licentious little courtesans. And when he goes in to see the king his face and his curly hair are always delicately dripping [with perfume], and he takes as much money from the communal difficulties as would satisfy even the legendary Midas."[3]
Greek Original:
Habros: lampros, trupheros, hapalos. en Epigrammasin: habron epitruzôn kitharas huper hezeto tettix. homôs de ho trupheros ekeinos kai habros kai hupo malakias tou sômatos kateagôs kai lelugismenos kai tas te komas anadoumenos, hôsper hai tôn hetairidôn aselgesterai, kai habrostages echôn aei to metôpon kai tous bostruchous, labôn chrusion ek tôn koinôn sumphorôn, hoson hikanon ên emplêsai kai ton ek tou muthou Midan, eiserrei pros ton basilea.
Notes:
For this adjective see already alpha alpha 73 and alpha 86, and again alpha 88.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha55 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.54.7 (Paulus Silentarius).
[3] Attributed by Hemsterhuys to Eunapius; again (in part) at alpha 1860.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; imagery; mythology; poetry; women; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:39:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@12:21:50.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:35:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 January 2006@10:26:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@04:35:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 December 2011@19:16:16.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:18:56.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:31:02.

Headword: Habroteron
Adler number: alpha,91
Translated headword: more delicately
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"But they behaved more delicately than them and were full of Sybaris."
Greek Original:
Habroteron: all' habroteron autôn eichon kai Subaridos mestoi êsan.
Notes:
Philostratus, Life of Apollonius of Tyana 4.27 (here illustrating the use of the neuter adjective as adverb; cf. already alpha 70).
See also alpha 86, alpha 87, alpha 88.
For the use of the toponym Sybaris in this way cf. sigma 1271, and see generally LSJ s.v. and OCD s.v.
Keywords: dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; geography; imagery; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:42:22.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; augmented note; added keyword) on 2 February 2001@03:29:56.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@11:58:23.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@03:58:52.
David Whitehead (x-refs; more keywords) on 21 December 2011@06:05:07.
Catharine Roth (deleted link) on 22 December 2011@19:21:32.

Headword: Abudênon epiphorêma
Adler number: alpha,100
Translated headword: Abydene dessert, Abudene dessert
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Whenever something unpleasant happens as a result of someone having shown up at the wrong time, we are accustomed to call it an "Abydene dessert." This is because the people of Abydos,[1] whenever they entertain a fellow-citizen or a foreigner, bring their children around to be admired after the ointments and the crowns. Those in attendance are disturbed by both the nurses clamoring and the children screaming. Hence it has become customary to say the foregoing.[2]
Greek Original:
Abudênon epiphorêma: hotan akairôs tinos epiphanentos aêdia tis êi, eiôthamen legein Abudênon epiphorêma. dia to tous Abudênous, hotan tina tôn politôn ê xenôn hestiôsi, meta to muron kai tous stephanous ta paidia peripherein philêthêsomena. tôn te tithênôn thorubousôn tôn te paidiôn kekragotôn enochleisthai tous parontas. aph' hou eithistai legein to prokeimenon.
Notes:
[1] A city on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont: see alpha 101.
[2] See also Zenobius 1.4 and other paroemiographers. For a different explanation (involving taxes and harbor dues) see Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 14.641A [14.47 Kaibel], citing Aristeides, On Proverbs.
Keywords: aetiology; children; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; ethics; food; geography; imagery; proverbs; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:00:52.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@22:59:16.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added note) on 11 January 2001@07:21:18.
David Whitehead (added another note) on 11 January 2001@07:58:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 16 November 2005@07:49:41.
Jennifer Benedict (title tags, cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@23:59:40.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 21 December 2011@06:54:39.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:30:33.
David Whitehead (tweaked a ref) on 14 January 2015@03:15:50.

Headword: Abusson
Adler number: alpha,104
Translated headword: abyss
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] that which not even a deep [buqo/s] can contain; but Ionians pronounce buqo/s as busso/s.[1]
From which also bussodomeu/ein ["to build in the deep"] appears to be said,[2] from the verb du/nw ["I sink"] [meaning] I enter upon secretly, with a change [of initial consonant] [giving] bu/w, bu/sw, be/busmai, be/busai, [and the nouns] buso/s and a)bu/ssos [meaning] where no-one enters because of its depth.[3]
Aristophanes in Frogs [writes]: "for immediately you will come to a huge lake, an absolute abyss."[4] And he also uses the word in the neuter: "they shall not make peace while the measureless [a)/busson] silver is with the goddess on the Acropolis." For 1,000 talents were stored on the Acropolis.[5]
"Abyss" is what the Holy Scripture calls the watery substance. So since the land is surrounded on all sides by waters [and] by great and small seas, David naturally called this [i.e., abyss] the earth's surrounding garment.[6] Also, "abyss calls to abyss", the same prophet says,[7] meaning figuratively military divisions and the excessive size of the multitude.[8]
"I was under water as [if] in a kind of abyss."[9]
So an abyss [is] a great amount of water.
Greek Original:
Abusson: hên oude buthos chôrêsai dunatai: Iônes de ton buthon busson phasin. hothen dokei legesthai kai bussodomeuein, para to dunô, to hupeiserchomai, kata tropên buô, busô, bebusmai, bebusai, busos kai abussos, hou oudeis eiserchetai dia to bathos. Aristophanês Batrachois: euthus gar epi limnên megalên hêxeis panu abusson. kai oudeterôs phêsin ho autos: heôs an êi to argurion to abusson para têi theôi, ouk eirêneusousin. en gar têi akropolei chilia talanta apekeito. Abusson kalei tên hugran ousian hê theia graphê. epei oun hê gê pantachothen hudasi periechetai megalois kai mikrois pelagesin, eikotôs peribolaion autês eirêken ho Dabid. kai, abussos abusson epikaleitai, ho autos prophêtês phêsin: ta stratiôtika legôn tagmata kai tên tou plêthous huperbolên tropikôs. hôs en abussôi tini hupobruchios egenomên. Abussos oun hudatôn plêthos polu.
Notes:
See also alpha 105.
[1] This comment on Ionian pronunciation comes from the scholiast on Aristophanes, Frogs 138, quoted later in the entry.
[2] In Homer, Odyssey, where bussodomeu/w occurs most frequently, it has the sense "brood over."
[3] cf. Etymologicum Magnum 4.44. These are principal parts of the verb bu/w, which means "to stuff," followed by buso/s, which does not exist according to LSJ. Probably this is a mistake for busso/s, "depth of the sea" (cf. beta 598, busso/n). The Suda generally has little concern for the distinction between single and double consonants. The author thus seems to propose a very dubious etymology: that a)-bussos literally means "unstuffable" -- i.e., unable to be entered. [Ms M (= Marcianus 448) omits this sentence.]
[4] Aristophanes, Frogs 137-8 (web address 1).
[5] "Silver" [a)rgu/rion] is a neuter noun in Greek, while lake [li/mnh] in the previous sentence is feminine; the point is that the same form a)/busson is used with both. The sentence quoted here is actually part of a scholion to Aristophanes, Lysistrata 173 (web address 2); Aristophanes uses the phrase to\ a)rgu/rion to\ a)/busson in that line itself.
[6] Psalm 103:6 LXX. See again under pi 1083.
[7] Psalm 41:8 LXX.
[8] Referring to the continuation of Psalm 41:8 LXX, "all thy waves and thy billows are gone over me" (KJV).
[9] From Theodoret's commentary (PG 80.1173) on Psalm 41:8 LXX.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: Christianity; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; epic; geography; history; imagery; military affairs; proverbs; religion
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:02:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, added keywords, set status) on 5 February 2001@11:48:31.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@08:11:37.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 4 July 2003@08:14:49.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added links; cosmetics) on 14 December 2003@15:22:17.
David Whitehead (modified translation and notes 6-9) on 28 April 2004@11:16:41.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@00:15:00.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 19 April 2011@18:23:25.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 25 April 2011@04:11:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and note, after consulting with the translator) on 26 April 2011@17:14:37.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@03:45:27.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 21 November 2014@10:58:29.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 21 November 2014@11:44:30.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:36:21.

Headword: Agathôn agathides
Adler number: alpha,123
Translated headword: skeins of good things
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The proverb is used in the comic poets in reference to a lot of good things.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] 'sea of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] 'anthills of good things', in reference to an abundance of good fortune.[3]
Also [sc. attested is] 'heap of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things and a lot of good fortune.[4]
Greek Original:
Agathôn agathides: tattetai hê paroimia para tois kômikois epi tôn pollôn agathôn. kai Agathôn thalassa, epi plêthous agathôn. kai Agathôn murmêkiai, epi plêthous eudaimonias. kai Agathôn sôros, epi plêthous agathôn kai pollês eudaimonias.
Notes:
The wordplay of the headword phrase a)gaqw=n a)gaqi/des is hard to render in English. 'Bundles of bounties' might do.
[1] (Same material in Photius.) Again at alpha 2601; and see also nu 77 and tau 147.
[2] Again at pi 2049.
[3] Comica adespota fr. 827 Kock, now 796 K.-A.
[4] cf. Apostolius 1.5, etc.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; ethics; imagery; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:28:16.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; minor cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@03:44:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:09:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:28:42.
David Whitehead (corrected a ref) on 16 March 2012@07:56:43.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 December 2014@04:31:45.
David Whitehead (coding) on 12 July 2015@03:58:05.

Headword: Agathônios
Adler number: alpha,125
Translated headword: Agathonios, Agathonius
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name.[1]
[The man] who was king of Tartessos.[2]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Agathon's pipe-playing": the soft and relaxed [kind]; alternatively that which is neither loose nor harsh, but temperate and very sweet.[3]
Greek Original:
Agathônios: onoma kurion. hos ebasileuse tês Tartêssou. kai Agathônios aulêsis: hê malakê kai eklelumenê: ê hê mête chalara, mête pikra, all' eukratos kai hêdistê.
Notes:
[1] Herodotus 1.163 gives it as Arganthonios (text at web address 1). See also tau 137.
[2] In southern Spain; probably the Biblical Tarshish. See generally tau 137 and OCD(4) s.v. (p.1433).
[3] Zenobius 1.2. On Agathon (an Athenian poet of the late C5 BC) and his reputation for softness see alpha 124; and on his aulos music, M.L. West, Ancient Greek Music (Oxford 1992) 354-5.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; ethics; geography; historiography; history; imagery; meter and music; proverbs; tragedy
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:33:27.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 25 April 2002@11:17:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:14:00.
Catharine Roth (cross-reference, italics, keyword) on 18 September 2006@18:09:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:42:50.
David Whitehead on 22 December 2011@07:43:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:34:58.

Headword: Agalaktes
Adler number: alpha,128
Translated headword: milkmates
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those who are members of the same family, blood-kin, brothers. But others [sc. define the terms as] those sharing priesthoods and [sc. who are also] fellow-family-members. But some [sc. define it as] those brought up together.[1]
Greek Original:
Agalaktes: homogeneis, homaimoi, adelphoi. alloi de tous hiereiôn koinônous kai sungeneis. hoi de suntrophous.
Notes:
See LSJ s.v. a)ga/lac and a)ga/laktos at web addresses 1 & 2. The present headword, a nominative plural, is evidently extracted from somewhere -- probably from its only attested instance outside lexica (etc.): Callimachus, Hymns 2.52.
cf. generally gamma 17.
[1] Same material in Eudemus, partially in other lexica.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food; imagery; poetry; religion
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@01:06:44.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added note and links) on 2 April 2001@10:21:55.
David Whitehead (x-ref; cosmetics) on 14 April 2004@05:07:11.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks) on 22 December 2011@08:39:56.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 11 October 2014@22:08:46.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 4 April 2015@10:32:17.

Headword: Agalmatophoroumenos
Adler number: alpha,136
Translated headword: image-bearing, image-carrying, enshrined as an image
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] carrying in one's mind images or impressions of things that one has thought of. Philo [sc. uses the term] this way.[1]
Greek Original:
Agalmatophoroumenos: agalmata êtoi tupous tôn noêthentôn pherôn en heautôi. houtôs Philôn.
Notes:
Same entry in Photius (Lexicon alpha91 Theodoridis) and elsewhere. The headword is present middle/passive participle, masculine nominative singular, of the verb a)galmatofore/w.
[1] Although the gloss has already defined the headword participle as though it were active, Philo Judaeus [see phi 448, and generally OCD(4) pp.1134-5] uniformly uses it in a passive sense, i.e. "enshrined". Adler and Theodoridis both cite De vita Mosis 1.27; see also De mutatione nominum 21; and cf. De somnis 1.32, De vita Mosis 2.11, 2.209.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; philosophy
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 1999@12:37:13.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:28:28.
Jennifer Benedict (title tagging) on 26 March 2008@01:02:38.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 27 March 2008@07:47:26.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 23 December 2011@04:25:35.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:59:24.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:37:39.

Headword: Aganophronos
Adler number: alpha,146
Translated headword: kindly-minded
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"And the cheerful face of kindly-minded peace."[1] [Meaning] easygoing and gentle.
Greek Original:
Aganophronos: to te tês aganophronos hêsuchias euêmeron prosôpon. tês praou kai prosênous.
Notes:
The headword, extracted from the quotation given, is genitive case.
cf. generally alpha 145, alpha 147, alpha 148, alpha 149.
[1] Aristophanes, Birds 1321 (web address 1 below), with scholion.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery
Translated by: William Hutton on 29 March 2000@00:02:48.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@11:13:36.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:09:24.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetic) on 27 March 2008@08:07:52.
David Whitehead on 23 December 2011@05:46:36.

Headword: Angaros
Adler number: alpha,163
Translated headword: a)/ggaros
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
and a)ggarei/a, public and compulsory servitude.[1]
"For just as to him eating seemed to be a mere distraction, with nature as it were putting him into compulsory servitude [a)ggareuome/nhs] when it came to food."[2]
Greek Original:
Angaros: kai Angareia, hê dêmosia kai anankaia douleia. hôsper gar ti autôi parergon to esthiein tês phuseôs auton angareuomenês peri ta brômata ephaineto einai.
Notes:
See also alpha 162, alpha 164, alpha 165.
[1] Same glossing in Hesychius and elsewhere.
[2] An approximation of Procopius, Secret History 13.29, on Justinian.
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; ethics; food; historiography; history; imagery
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:07:47.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:31:52.
William Hutton (Modified translation, added cross reference) on 28 June 2001@13:57:28.
William Hutton on 28 June 2001@13:59:24.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 3 February 2003@07:31:38.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@01:32:33.
David Whitehead (another note and keyword; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@07:59:50.

Headword: Agastonos
Adler number: alpha,171
Translated headword: much-groaning
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] copiously moaning.
Greek Original:
Agastonos: polustenaktos.
Notes:
Same or similar entries in other lexica; references at Photius alpha128 Theodoridis.
The headword adjective is used of Poseidon's wife Amphitrite (personifying the sea) in Homer, Odyssey 12.97 (web address 1), and in the Homeric Hymn (3) to Apollo 94 (web address 2); it is also attested in a general sense at Aeschylus, Seven against Thebes 99 (web address 3).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: definition; epic; imagery; mythology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@14:50:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and keyword, added links) on 31 October 2001@10:12:18.
David Whitehead (expanded note; added a keyword; cosmetics) on 14 April 2004@05:35:23.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 26 March 2008@01:52:49.
David Whitehead (augmented note; another keyword) on 23 December 2011@08:49:34.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@05:55:48.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note and links) on 3 October 2013@00:53:22.

Headword: Agastores
Adler number: alpha,172
Translated headword: womb-mates
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] brothers, natural brothers, twins.[1]
Those from the same womb.[2]
Greek Original:
Agastores: adelphoi, homaimoi, didumoi. hoi homogastores.
Notes:
[1] Similarly in Hesychius alpha357. The headword is the nominative plural of a)ga/stwr. This noun (LSJ entry at web address 1) is largely confined to lexica and grammars but does occur in Lycophron, Alexandra 264 (genitive plural).
[2] cf. Etymologicum Magnum 6.20.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; medicine; poetry
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@14:49:51.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, added links, set status) on 31 October 2001@10:14:28.
William Hutton (Merely noting that the reference to 'links' in my previous vetting comments is erroneous: this entry currently has no external links.) on 31 October 2001@17:22:16.
Catharine Roth (inserted link) on 1 November 2001@17:11:02.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 3 February 2003@07:46:23.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@08:59:09.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@05:59:01.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@21:59:05.

Headword: Agelarchês
Adler number: alpha,183
Translated headword: herd-leader
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The leader of the herd of oxen.
Greek Original:
Agelarchês: ho tês agelês tôn boôn archôn.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon.
LSJ s.v. (web address 1) shows both this literal meaning and the extended one of any kind of leader.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; imagery; military affairs; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:19:29.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note) on 11 February 2001@09:50:50.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 15 October 2007@01:23:17.
David Whitehead (tweaked note; more keywords) on 15 October 2007@03:11:25.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@02:02:18.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 29 December 2011@06:36:16.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 29 December 2011@11:39:20.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link, coding) on 5 April 2015@23:22:25.

Headword: Agelaios
Adler number: alpha,187
Translated headword: ordinary
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] no-account fellow [i)diw/ths]. Or the lead animal in the herd.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the genitive plural] "of a)gelai=oi", of no-account fellows, of rustics.
"Such-and-such is likely enough of [= in] ordinary men". Meaning common ones.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] "of a)gelai=oi", of the random masses. It would be used metaphorically from animals in herds or from fish,[3] which they say feed lavishly and in schools [a)gelhdo/n].[4]
Greek Original:
Agelaios: idiôtês. ê ho en agelêi diagôn. kai Agelaiôn, idiôtôn, rhembôdôn. tôn agelaiôn eoiken anthrôpôn einai ho toioutos. anti tou eutelôn. kai Agelaiôn, tôn pollôn kai tuchontôn. eiê d' an ek metaphoras tôn agelaiôn zôiôn ê apo tôn ichthuôn, hous boskesthai rhudên kai agelêdon phasin.
Notes:
The closest comparanda for this entry in its entirety are found in the Platonic Lexicon ascribed to Timaeus (971b.10); Synagoge (Codex B) alpha99; Photius, Lexicon alpha134 and alpha141 Theodoridis; none of these matches up precisely, however. Snippets evidently from the same source appear elsewhere, as noted below.
[1] For the distinction see already alpha 186. Thus far the entry = Synagoge alpha49; cf. Aelius Dionysius alpha17; Eudemus 3.20; Hesychius alpha424, omicron3.
[2] Julian, Oration 7 (205D), where "such-and-such" = the invention of myth. The glosses (minus the quotation) in this and the previous sentence are paralleled in Etymologicum Gudianum 4.3 and Etymologicum Magnum 7.41.
[3] cf. alpha 189.
[4] The reference is probably to Herodotus 2.93.1, where both i)xqu/es a)gelai=oi and the adverb a)gelhdo/n (alpha 191) appear (see web address 1). This etymological information also appears in Harpokration alpha8 Keaney (4.13 Dindorf) as well as in some of the sources cited above.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; imagery; rhetoric; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:23:22.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:44:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 18 October 2005@05:38:36.
Catharine Roth (betacode typos) on 12 October 2007@01:13:40.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation, added betacode, augmented note, raised status) on 12 October 2007@19:46:19.
Catharine Roth (added link) on 12 October 2007@22:34:25.
William Hutton (Augmented and modified notes) on 12 November 2007@06:25:26.
William Hutton (cosmetics) on 5 August 2009@13:42:54.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 29 December 2011@06:55:10.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 29 December 2011@11:48:32.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:16:07.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:37:00.

Headword: Agelêdon
Adler number: alpha,191
Translated headword: gregariously, herd-fashion, in a herd
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
An adverb.
Greek Original:
Agelêdon: epirrêma.
Notes:
First in Homer, Iliad 16.160 (in a simile, of wolves: web address 1); see also e.g. Herodotus 2.93 (of fish: web address 2).
Similar entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon; and see also Hesychius s.v., where Latte confidently asserts that the headword is extracted from the Septuagint (2 Maccabees 3.18).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; historiography; imagery; religion; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 10 April 2000@23:26:12.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 11 February 2001@10:25:39.
Catharine Roth (added links and keywords, augmented note) on 12 October 2007@01:11:01.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 29 December 2011@11:52:26.
David Whitehead (expanded note; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@06:03:32.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:20:54.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 5 April 2015@10:28:56.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:29:30.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:39:13.

Headword: Agelêphin
Adler number: alpha,193
Translated headword: in a herd
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] from/out of the herd.
Greek Original:
Agelêphin: ek tês agelês.
Note:
The gloss reflects the context of this adverb at its first attested appearance, in Homer, Iliad 2.480-1: a bull in a herd of cattle stands out from it (web address 1). Similar glosses appear in a scholion on this verse, as well as in Hesychius (alpha438) and, according to Adler, the Ambrosian Lexicon.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; imagery; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 10 April 2000@23:54:35.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 11 February 2001@10:36:49.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 12 October 2007@01:02:51.
Catharine Roth on 12 October 2007@01:03:21.
Catharine Roth (added link and keyword) on 12 October 2007@01:17:02.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:24:25.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 5 April 2015@10:30:27.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:32:16.

Headword: Ankistreuei
Adler number: alpha,247
Translated headword: angles for
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning he/she/it] entices with bait.
Greek Original:
Ankistreuei: deleazei.
Note:
LSJ entry for this verb (which has figurative as well as literal applications) at web address 1. The present instance of it -- third person singular, present indicative active -- occurs also in other lexica and grammars, with the same glossing (references at Photius alpha183 Theodoridis); it must be quoted from somewhere.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food; imagery
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg on 24 November 1998@14:02:49.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added headword translation and link (not currently functional because of an error in LSJ at Perseus).) on 4 March 2001@22:46:06.
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword; cosmetics) on 23 July 2003@06:57:27.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@05:22:26.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:00:05.

Headword: Ankôn
Adler number: alpha,249
Translated headword: elbow
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"In the royal palace of Gelimer was a building full of darkness, which the Carthaginians used to call [the] Elbow; therein were thrown all toward whom the tyrant was ill-disposed. There, in the time of Belisarius, happened to be confined many traders from the east about to be destroyed by the tyrant at that time, whom the guard of the prison released."[1]
"And he placed the siege-engines in the way that seemed most timely, and he hit both the wall-angles [angkones] and the trenches from both sides."[2]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gkw=nes, a certain part of the house.[3]
Another meaning of a)gkw=nes is everything that, in a dream, fixes the well-ordered aspect of life.[4]
*)agkw=nes [are] also the prominences of rivers, the ones at the banks.
"It was not possible to sail through to the stream ahead because of the size of the descending prominences which it was necessary for those dragging the ships to bend round."[5]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gkw=nes, [in the sense of] the heights of the mountains. "Some of you seek out the [western] heights, and some the eastern, going toward the evil exit of the man."[6]
And [there is] a proverbial expression: wiping one's nose with the elbow.[7]
Bion the philosopher said: "my father was a freed slave, wiping his nose with his elbow;" it indicated clearly the saltfish-importer.[8]
See another proverbial expression, 'sweet bend' [in a river, etc.].[9]
Greek Original:
Ankôn: en têi basilikêi aulêi tou Gelimeros oikêma ên skotous anapleôn, ho dê Ankôna ekaloun hoi Karchêdonioi: entha eneballonto hapantes hois an chalepainoi ho turannos. entautha epi Belisariou polloi katheirgmenoi etunchanon tôn heôiôn emporôn, hous mellontas kat' ekeino kairou anaireisthai hupo tou turannou ho phulax tou desmôtêriou apeluse. kai dietithei tas mêchanas hêi malista edokei kairion, ankônas te kai taphrous ebaleto hekaterôthen. kai Ankônes, meros ti tês oikias. ankônes de kai panta ta prospêssomena kat' onar to kosmion tou biou sêmainei. Ankônes kai hai tôn potamôn exochai, hai para tais ochthais. ou dunaton ên pros antion ton rhoun anaplein dia to megethos tôn prospiptontôn ankônôn, hous edei kamptein parelkontas tas naus. kai Ankônas, tas akras tôn orôn. hoi de speirousin ankônas, hoi d' antêlious zêteit' iontes t' andros exodon kakên. kai paroimia: tôi ankôni apomussomenos. Biôn phêsin ho philosophos: emou ho patêr men ên apeleutheros, tôi ankôni apomussomenos: diedêlou de ton tarichemporon. zêtei kai allên paroimian, to glukus ankôn.
Notes:
[1] An abridgement of Procopius, History of the Wars of Justinian 3.20.4-7.
[2] From an unidentifiable military narrative. (For the headword in this sense see LSJ s.v., II.)
[3] For this gloss, cf. iota 552.
[4] Artemidorus 1.74; cf. omicron 349.
[5] Quotation unidentifiable.
[6] Sophocles, Ajax 805-6 (web address 1); the first adjective is garbled here.
[7] cf. Mantissa Proverbiorum 3.31 and the quotation which follows here.
[8] Diogenes Laertius 4.46.
[9] gamma 316.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: architecture; biography; chronology; daily life; dreams; economics; ethics; food; geography; historiography; history; imagery; military affairs; philosophy; proverbs; science and technology; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg on 24 November 1998@13:57:02.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (supplied headword; added notes; augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@04:02:29.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@08:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 20 November 2005@10:40:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 February 2011@08:38:56.
Catharine Roth (tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 February 2011@01:08:42.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@05:46:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 30 December 2014@00:14:19.

Headword: Ankulomêtês kai Ankulomêteô. kai Ankulomêtai
Adler number: alpha,253
Translated headword: crooked of counsel
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[a)gkulomh/ths] and a)gkulomh/tew.[1] Also [sc. attested is] a)gkulomh=tai: men of devious devices.[2]
Greek Original:
Ankulomêtês kai Ankulomêteô. kai Ankulomêtai, hoi skoliobouloi.
Notes:
Adler's headword -- here divided between headword and gloss -- consists of three declensional forms of the same word (used, in epic and other poetry, of Kronos, Prometheus and others): nominative singular, genitive singular, nominative plural. See web address 1 for the LSJ entry.
[1] cf. Lexicon Ambrosianum 161.
[2] Same plural and gloss in other lexica; references at Photius alpha188 Theodoridis.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; imagery; mythology; poetry
Translated by: Roger Travis on 4 October 2000@11:42:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added note and link, set status) on 14 June 2001@23:37:50.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 21 July 2003@06:46:14.
David Whitehead (supplemented translation; augmented notes and keywords) on 4 January 2012@08:38:36.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:04:45.
David Whitehead (coding) on 4 October 2015@10:38:03.

Headword: Ankulocheilês kai Ankulocheilos
Adler number: alpha,255
Translated headword: crooked-beaked
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Bent-beaked, an epithet of the eagle, which has curved talons.[1] But in reference to Cleon [it means] having crooked hands for theft and seizure.
Greek Original:
Ankulocheilês kai Ankulocheilos: skoliocheilos, epitheton tou aetou, epikampeis tas chêlas echôn. epi de Kleônos, ankulas tas cheiras echôn pros to kleptein kai harpazein.
Notes:
The headword actually presents two words (related to chi 225) that differ only in having different adjectival endings: a)gkuloxei/lhs and a)gkulo/xeilos; LSJ only documents the existence of the former.
[1] From the scholia to Aristophanes, Knights 197 (web address 1 below), where an adjective variously transmitted as a)gkuloxei/lhs or a)gkuloxh/lhs ('crooked clawed', from chi 276) is applied to Cleon (kappa 1731). The latter is what modern editors rightly print, but note that in late Greek the two words would have been homophones. See LSJ at a)gkuloxh/lhs (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; ethics; imagery; medicine; politics; zoology
Translated by: Roger Travis on 4 October 2000@11:53:19.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, augmented notes and added links, added keywords, set status) on 15 June 2001@09:32:39.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; restorative cosmetics) on 10 February 2003@09:16:21.
David Whitehead (tweaked notes; more keywords; cosmetics) on 1 June 2009@04:19:34.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 4 January 2012@08:56:26.

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