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Headword:
Adler number: alpha,1
Translated headword: ah! ah!
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In Aristophanes an adverb accompanying surprise and command. "Ah! ah! Don't get that torch near me!"[1]
'Ah! ah!' must be read separately, not elided; and they both have smooth breathing.[2]. For if they were read together as one word, there would be no need of two accent marks.[3] "Ah" marks surprise, but "ha ha" is for awe, as Agathias says in the Epigrams: "ha, a very daring wax it was that formed..."[4]
Aab.[5]
Greek Original:
#
Notes:
[1] Aristophanes, Plutus [Wealth] 1052 (web address 1). The first sentence is derived from scholia to this passage, and this may also be true of the rest of the entry.
[2] That is, it is "ah! ah!", not "ha! ha!" A difference registered in Greek by the orientation of a small breathing mark that is easily reversed in transcription, especially since by the time the Suda was compiled the initial 'h' had ceased to be pronounced.
[3] i.e. ἂ ἄ is two words, ἀά would be one.
[4] Greek Anthology 1.34.2; again (with slight variations) at mu 389 and sigma 664.
[5] This gloss-less addendum is actually a separate entry that occurs only in ms S. (In Adler's numbering system this is designated alpha 1b, while the main entry is alpha 1a.) Apparently this is a reference to the Hebrew month of Av, attested with this Greek spelling only in Joannes Lydus, De mensibus 3.22.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: chronology; comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 9 November 1999@09:47:43.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised vetting status) on 26 September 2000@14:01:40.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@04:21:58.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 April 2007@04:35:29.
William Hutton (modified translation, rearranged layout, added note and link, set status) on 19 August 2007@10:41:27.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 22 March 2008@17:08:15.
Catharine Roth (coding, typo) on 22 March 2008@19:48:38.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:43:10.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 5 August 2013@01:21:19.

Headword: Ἄβατον
Adler number: alpha,23
Translated headword: inaccessible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] sacred, unapproachable, desolate;[1] also an 'inaccessible' road, [meaning] impassable.
Greek Original:
Ἄβατον: ἱερὸν, ἀπρόσιτον, ἔρημον: καὶ ὁδὸς ἄβατος, ἡ ἀπόρευτος.
Notes:
The headword is the neuter singular form of this adjective, which, as a substantive, can be used for the adyton of a temple or shrine.
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge alpha5, and Photius, Lexicon alpha31 Theodoridis; cf. Hesychius alpha91 (where Latte confidently asserts that the headword is quoted from Euripides, Bacchae 10).
Keywords: architecture; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:21:29.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keywords and status) on 20 January 2001@11:38:48.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added a keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:31:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keyword, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:18:41.
Catharine Roth (deleted keyword) on 3 October 2007@19:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:05.
William Hutton (Modifed and updated notes.) on 11 November 2007@07:16:09.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@06:14:37.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@03:58:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@00:52:27.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:33:19.
William Hutton (typo) on 21 August 2013@10:06:07.

Headword: Ἀβελτεροκόκκυξ
Adler number: alpha,31
Translated headword: silly cuckoo
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The vacuous and silly man.[1]
Greek Original:
Ἀβελτεροκόκκυξ: ὁ κενὸς καὶ ἀβέλτερος.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 32, alpha 33.
[1] Plato Comicus fr. 64 Kock = 65 K.-A. (Phrynichus 48.11). For "cuckoo" alone, in this sense, see e.g. Aristophanes, Acharnians 598 (web address 1 below), and Hesychius s.v. κόκκυγες .
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; ethics; imagery; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:28:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, keywords, raised status) on 24 January 2001@22:19:23.
David Whitehead (modified translation and note) on 25 January 2001@03:48:12.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 8 October 2007@00:27:35.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 23 March 2008@01:09:06.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@01:04:18.
David Whitehead (x-refs; more keywords;) on 19 December 2011@06:48:41.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:23:30.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:55.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 1 January 2015@08:53:56.

Headword: Ἀβέλτερος
Adler number: alpha,32
Translated headword: thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] mindless, stupid. For the intelligent man [is] βέλτερος ["thoughtful, superior"].[1]
"No, by Zeus, not the greedy and thoughtless fellow, but the mindless and conceitedly slow-witted."[2] Menander in Perinthia [writes]: "any servant who takes an idle and easy master and deceives him does not know what a great accomplishment it is to make a greater fool of one who is already thoughtless".[3] They also call ἀβελτηρία ["thoughtlessness"] an ἀβελτήριον ["thoughtless thing"]. Anaxandrides in Helen[4] [writes]: "[A:] an anchor, a little boat, - call it what vessel you want. [B:] O Heracles of the sacred precinct of thoughtlessness. [A:] But one could not estimate its size."
Also [sc. attested is] ἀβελτηρία , [meaning] stupidity.
Or mindlessness.
Menander [writes]: "their mind drove them to such thoughtlessness that they prayed for victory over each other rather than over the enemy."[5]
Greek Original:
Ἀβέλτερος: ἀνόητος, ἀσύνετος. βέλτερος γὰρ ὁ φρόνιμος. οὐ μὰ Δί' οὐχ ὁ πλεονέκτης καὶ ἀγνώμων, ἀλλ' ὁ ἀνόητος καὶ εὐήθης μετὰ χαυνότητος. Μένανδρος Περινθίᾳ: ὅστις παραλαβὼν δεσπότην ἀπράγμονα καὶ κοῦφον ἐξαπατᾷ θεράπων, οὐκ οἶδ' ὅ τι οὗτος μεγαλεῖόν ἐστι διαπεπραγμένος, ἐπαβελτερώσας τόν ποτε ἀβέλτερον. λέγουσι δὲ καὶ ἀβελτήριον τὴν ἀβελτηρίαν. Ἀλεξανδρίδης Ἑλένῃ: ἄγκυρα, λέμβος, σκεῦος ὅ τι βούλει λέγε. ὦ Ἡράκλεις ἀβελτηρίου τεμενικοῦ. ἀλλ' οὐδ' ἂν εἰπεῖν τὸ μέγεθος δύναιτό τις. καὶ Ἀβελτηρία, ἡ ἀφροσύνη. ἢ ἀνοησία. Μένανδρος: εἰς τοῦτο δὲ ἀβελτηρίας ἤλασεν αὐτοῖς ὁ νοῦς, ὥστε θάτερον μέρος τὴν κατὰ θατέρου μᾶλλον ἢ τὴν κατὰ τῶν πολεμίων εὔχεσθαι νίκην.
Notes:
On this headword, a comic formation literally meaning non-superior, see generally LSJ s.v. (web address 1 below); and cf. alpha 31, alpha 33.
[1] These glosses are paralleled in a variety of other lexica (and in the scholia to Aristophanes, Clouds 1201 and Ecclesiazusae 768).
[2] Quotation (an illustration of the first of the glossing words, not the headword) unidentifiable; also in Photius and Aelius Dionysius.
[3] Menander fr. 393 Kock.
[4] Anaxandrides [see generally alpha 1982] fr. 12 Kock (and K.-A.). But note that Adler prints the manuscript reading "Alexandrides", on the strength of the (apparent) mention of such a playwright in alpha 3824. On the emendation to Anaxandrides, see Toup vol. 1 p. 9; Adler attributes the emendation to 'Iunius' (probably Adriaan de Jonghe, 1511-1575, author of a Greek/Latin Lexicon).
[5] Not M. the comic poet, quoted above, but the C6 CE historian Menander Protector [mu 591]: his fr. 28 Blockley.
Reference:
Toup, Jonathan, and Richard Porson. Emendationes in Suidam Et Hesychium, Et Alios Lexicographos Graecos. Oxford 1790
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; military affairs; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:02:21.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; added keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@05:52:19.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 23 March 2008@13:05:56.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@04:34:27.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@11:17:06.
Catharine Roth (fixed note number, augmented note, added bibliography, tweaked link) on 15 May 2008@15:34:15.
David Whitehead (typo) on 16 May 2008@07:55:44.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 20 May 2008@11:50:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:38:00.
David Whitehead (updated a reference; cosmetics) on 3 January 2012@04:21:06.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 22 December 2014@04:27:32.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@09:15:50.

Headword: Ἀβελτερώτατοι
Adler number: alpha,33
Translated headword: most thoughtless, very thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Aristophanes [writes]: "before this most/very thoughtless men used to sit gaping -- Dolts, Half-wits".[1]
Greek Original:
Ἀβελτερώτατοι: Ἀριστοφάνης: τέως δ' ἀβελτερώτατοι κεχηνότες Μαμμάκυθοι Μελιτίδαι κάθηνται.
Notes:
(Entry lacking, Adler reports, in ms S.)
Masculine nominative plural of this superlative, evidently from the quotation given. See also alpha 31, alpha 32.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 989-991 (web address 1), quoted also at beta 468 and mu 121. The other two terms used here (each of them apparently stemming from a proper name) stand at least as much in need of glossing as does this adjective: see Dover (below) 315-16. For the formation of the adjective, see also the entry in LSJ s.v. (web address 2 below).
Reference:
Aristophanes, Frogs, edited with introduction and commentary by K.J. Dover (Oxford 1993)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:03:23.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented note; added bibliography; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:29:41.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 11 January 2001@12:49:46.
William Hutton on 2 February 2001@11:46:00.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 23 March 2008@14:05:57.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@05:10:07.
Catharine Roth on 13 April 2009@13:11:48.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:29:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:25:45.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:24.
David Whitehead (another note) on 28 March 2014@06:25:35.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 April 2015@09:16:57.

Headword: Ἄβρα
Adler number: alpha,68
Translated headword: favorite
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Not simply a maidservant nor even the pretty maidservant is called [favorite], but a daughter of one of the house slaves and an honored one, whether born in the house or not. Menander in False Heracles [writes]: "the mother of these two sisters is dead. A concubine of their father's, who used to be their mother's favorite slave, is bringing them up."[1] In Sikyonian: "he bought a beloved slave instead and did not hand the slave over to his wife, but kept her apart, as is appropriate for a free woman."[2] In Faithless One: "I thought if the old man got the gold, he'd get himself a favorite slave right away."[3]
Iamblichus [writes]: "since this was difficult and something of a rarity, with the [woman] housekeeper on guard and another favorite slave-woman also present, he persuades the daughter to run away without her parents' knowledge."[4]
Greek Original:
Ἄβρα: οὔτε ἁπλῶς θεράπαινα οὔτε ἡ εὔμορφος θεράπαινα λέγεται, ἀλλ' οἰκότριψ γυναικὸς κόρη καὶ ἔντιμος, εἴτε οἰκογενὴς εἴτε μή. Μένανδρος Ψευδηρακλεῖ: μήτηρ τέθνηκε ταῖν ἀδελφαῖν ταῖν δυεῖν ταύταιν. τρέφει δὲ παλλακή τις τοῦ πατρὸς αὐτὰς, ἄβρα τῆς μητρὸς αὐτῶν γενομένη. Σικυωνίῳ: καὶ ἄβραν γὰρ ἀντωνούμενος ἐρωμένην, ταύτῃ μὲν οὐ παρέδωκ' ἔχειν, τρέφειν δὲ χωρὶς, ὡς ἐλευθέρᾳ πρέπει. Ἀπίστῳ: ὤμην εἰ τὸ χρυσίον λάβοι ὁ γέρων, θεράπαιναν εὐθὺς ἠγορασμένην ἄβραν ἔσεσθαι. Ἰάμβλιχος: ἐπεὶ δὲ τοῦτο χαλεπὸν ἦν καὶ σπάνιόν τι τὸ τῆς οἰκουροῦ φυλαττούσης καὶ ἄβρας τινὸς ἄλλης συμπαρούσης, ἀναπείθει τὴν κόρην λαθοῦσαν τοὺς γονεῖς ἀποδρᾶναι.
Notes:
The main part of this entry is also in Photius, Lexicon alpha50 Theodoridis (where the headword is plural); similar material in other lexica.
LSJ uses the rough breathing (ἅβρα ) for the word it defines specifically as 'favorite slave'. See web address 1 below.
[1] Menander fr. 520 Kock, 453 K.-Th., 411 K.-A.
[2] Menander fr. 438 Kock (1 Sandbach).
[3] Menander fr. 64 Kock, 58 K.-Th., 63 K.-A.
[4] Iamblichus, Babyloniaca fr. 56 Habrich.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; gender and sexuality; philosophy; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:13:15.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:59:03.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added link) on 30 January 2001@23:04:27.
David Whitehead (added keyword) on 31 January 2001@04:33:38.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 24 April 2002@03:20:49.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 15 August 2007@10:03:18.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:26:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:03:54.
David Whitehead (updated refs) on 16 August 2013@07:04:59.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@03:49:04.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@06:54:57.

Headword: Ἀβέλτερος νοῦς
Adler number: alpha,71
Translated headword: foolish mind
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"[A foolish mind,] empty, naive, young."
Greek Original:
Ἀβέλτερος νοῦς, χαῦνος, εὐήθης, νέος.
Notes:
An iambic trimeter, unattributable to any particular author but regarded by Maas (BZ 28 (1928) 421) as coming from a comedy; now Kassel-Austin adespota fr. 915.
The entry is out of alphabetical order; cf. alpha 31, alpha 32, alpha 33.
Keywords: comedy; ethics; meter and music; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:27:46.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, keyword, set status) on 31 January 2001@12:52:43.
David Whitehead (rearranged headword and translation; added note; altered keyword) on 1 February 2001@03:30:55.
David Whitehead (internal reorganisation; augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:16:59.
David Whitehead (expanded note; another keyword) on 29 December 2014@03:01:59.
David Whitehead (my typo) on 2 April 2015@10:38:43.

Headword: Ἀβρότονον
Adler number: alpha,95
Translated headword: wormwood
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Type of plant.
Greek Original:
Ἀβρότονον: εἶδος βοτάνης.
Notes:
Wormwood, or other Artemisia species; see e.g. Theophrastus Enquiry into Plants 6.7.3.
(Also a woman's name in New Comedy.)
Keywords: botany; comedy; definition; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:45:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, set status) on 1 February 2001@22:41:01.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 3 January 2005@10:48:59.
David Whitehead on 21 December 2011@06:29:50.
Catharine Roth (expanded abbreviation) on 24 November 2014@19:45:34.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 25 November 2014@23:07:45.

Headword: Ἄβυδος
Adler number: alpha,101
Translated headword: Abudos, Abydos, Abydus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A city.[1]
The word is applied to an informant [συκοφάντης ] because of the common belief that the people of Abudos were informers.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] an adverb, Ἀβυδόθι , [meaning] in Abudos.[3]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] ἄΒυδον φλυαρίαν ["Abudos nonsense"], [meaning] great [nonsense].[4]
And [sc. attested is] Ἀβυδηνὸς , [meaning] he [who comes] from Abudos.[5]
Greek Original:
Ἄβυδος: πόλις. ἐπὶ συκοφάντου τάττεται ἡ λέξις, διὰ τὸ δοκεῖν συκοφάντας εἶναι τοὺς Ἀβυδηνούς. καὶ ἐπίρρημα, Ἀβυδόθι, ἐν Ἀβύδῳ. καὶ Ἄβυδον φλυαρίαν, τὴν πολλήν. καὶ Ἀβυδηνὸς, ὁ ἀπὸ Ἀβύδου.
Notes:
[1] = Lexicon Ambrosianum 82, according to Adler. In fact two cities of this name are known: one on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid G4; present-day Maltepe) and Abydos/Ebot in Upper Egypt (Barrington Atlas map 77 grid F4); without much doubt, the former is meant here. (In Hesychius alpha23 the gloss is fuller -- 'a Trojan city of the Hellespont'. Latte regards the entry as prompted by Homer, Iliad 2.836, accusative case, although similar wording appears in a late scholion to Iliad 17.584, where the adverbial derivative ἀβυδόθι appears -- see n. 3 below). See also alpha 100, sigma 465, and generally OCD(4) s.v.
[2] = the first sentence of Pausanias the Atticist alpha3 and Photius alpha63 Theodoridis; cf. also Zenobius 1.1, s.v. Ἀβυδηνὸν ἐπιφόρημα (alpha 100), and Kassel-Austin, PCG III.2 p.376 on Aristophanes fr. 755. See generally sigma 1330, sigma 1331, sigma 1332.
[3] Probably from commentary to Homer, Iliad 17.584, the only literary attestation of this adverb prior to Musaeus Grammaticus (5/6 CE); cf. Apollonius Dyscolus On Adverbs 2.1.1.164.
[4] = Synagoge Codex B alpha44, but in the better mss of Photius (Lexicon alpha64 Theodoridis) the adjective (in a nominative-case entry) is ἄβυθος ('bottomless'), surely correctly; cf. alpha 104. The ultimate source may be Plato, Parmenides 130D, though there too the text is uncertain: perhaps εἴς τιν' ἄβυθον φλυαρίαν (web address 1), though the alternatives include εἴς τινα βῦθον φλυαρίας . On the adjective ἄβυθος, a synonym for ἄβυσσος, see the LSJ entry at web address 2.
[5] There are many literary attestations of this form of the ethnic adjective (nominative singular masculine), beginning with Herodotus 4.138. For an instance in the Suda see pi 71.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; geography; law; philosophy; proverbs
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@13:59:06.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@21:07:09.
Ross Scaife ✝ (fixed keywords) on 2 March 2000@17:48:48.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; replaced existing note; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:05:35.
Jennifer Benedict (added links, betacode fix, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:03:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 18 April 2011@14:40:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 25 April 2011@04:09:51.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@09:19:59.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1) on 1 February 2012@05:52:37.
David Whitehead (expansions to notes) on 16 August 2013@07:33:01.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 4 July 2014@08:19:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:21:46.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:35:15.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 22 December 2014@09:26:49.

Headword: Ἀβυρτάκη
Adler number: alpha,103
Translated headword: sour-sauce, aburtake, abyrtake, abyrtace
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A sharp-flavored barbarian dish, prepared from leeks and cress[-seeds] and pomegranate kernels and other such things, quite clearly pungent. Theopompus in Theseus [writes]: "he will reach the land of the Medes, where aburtake is made mostly of cress and leeks."[1] The noun also appears in the Kekruphalos of Menander.[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβυρτάκη: ὑπότριμμα βαρβαρικὸν, κατασκευαζόμενον διὰ πράσων καὶ καρδάμων καὶ ῥόας κόκκων καὶ ἑτέρων τοιούτων, δριμὺ δηλονότι. Θεόπομπος Θησεῖ: ἥξει δὲ Μήδων γαῖαν, ἔνθα καρδάμων πλείστων ποιεῖται καὶ πράσων ἀβυρτάκη. ἔστι καὶ ἐν Κεκρυφάλῳ Μενάνδρου τοὔνομα.
Notes:
[1] Theopompus fr. 17 Kock, now 18 Kassel-Austin. In the long list of food allowances for the Persian Kings (allegedly seen in Babylon by Alexander the Great) in Polyaenus 4.3.32 there is a mention of salted capers "from which they make abyrtakai".
[2] Menander fr. 280 Kock, 247 Koerte, now 217 Kassel-Austin. For other appearances of the word in comedy see LSJ s.v. at web address 1 below.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: botany; comedy; food; geography
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:00:55.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, added keywords, set status) on 5 February 2001@11:10:09.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes; cosmetics) on 6 February 2001@03:24:05.
David Whitehead (modified translation) on 14 July 2006@03:15:01.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:07:25.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and link) on 19 April 2011@10:58:42.
Catharine Roth (raised status) on 20 April 2011@17:32:46.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 28 December 2014@05:36:45.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 December 2014@10:42:30.

Headword: Ἄβυσσον
Adler number: alpha,104
Translated headword: abyss
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] that which not even a deep [βυθός ] can contain; but Ionians pronounce βυθός as βυσσός .[1]
From which also βυσσοδομεύειν ["to build in the deep"] appears to be said,[2] from the verb δύνω ["I sink"] [meaning] I enter upon secretly, with a change [of initial consonant] [giving] βύω , βύσω , βέβυσμαι , βέβυσαι , [and the nouns] βυσός and ἀβύσσος [meaning] where no-one enters because of its depth.[3]
Aristophanes in Frogs [writes]: "for immediately you will come to a huge lake, an absolute abyss."[4] And he also uses the word in the neuter: "they shall not make peace while the measureless [ἄβυσσον ] silver is with the goddess on the Acropolis." For 1,000 talents were stored on the Acropolis.[5]
"Abyss" is what the Holy Scripture calls the watery substance. So since the land is surrounded on all sides by waters [and] by great and small seas, David naturally called this [i.e., abyss] the earth's surrounding garment.[6] Also, "abyss calls to abyss", the same prophet says,[7] meaning figuratively military divisions and the excessive size of the multitude.[8]
"I was under water as [if] in a kind of abyss."[9]
So an abyss [is] a great amount of water.
Greek Original:
Ἄβυσσον: ἣν οὐδὲ βυθὸς χωρῆσαι δύναται: Ἴωνες δὲ τὸν βυθὸν βυσσόν φασιν. ὅθεν δοκεῖ λέγεσθαι καὶ βυσσοδομεύειν, παρὰ τὸ δύνω, τὸ ὑπεισέρχομαι, κατὰ τροπὴν βύω, βύσω, βέβυσμαι, βέβυσαι, βυσὸς καὶ ἀβύσσος, οὗ οὐδεὶς εἰσέρχεται διὰ τὸ βάθος. Ἀριστοφάνης Βατράχοις: εὐθὺς γὰρ ἐπὶ λίμνην μεγάλην ἥξεις πάνυ ἄβυσσον. καὶ οὐδετέρως φησὶν ὁ αὐτός: ἕως ἂν ᾖ τὸ ἀργύριον τὸ ἄβυσσον παρὰ τῇ θεῷ, οὐκ εἰρηνεύσουσιν. ἐν γὰρ τῇ ἀκροπόλει χίλια τάλαντα ἀπέκειτο. Ἄβυσσον καλεῖ τὴν ὑγρὰν οὐσίαν ἡ θεία γραφή. ἐπεὶ οὖν ἡ γῆ πανταχόθεν ὕδασι περιέχεται μεγάλοις καὶ μικροῖς πελάγεσιν, εἰκότως περιβόλαιον αὐτῆς εἴρηκεν ὁ Δαβίδ. καὶ, ἄβυσσος ἄβυσσον ἐπικαλεῖται, ὁ αὐτὸς προφήτης φησίν: τὰ στρατιωτικὰ λέγων τάγματα καὶ τὴν τοῦ πλήθους ὑπερβολὴν τροπικῶς. ὡς ἐν ἀβύσσῳ τινὶ ὑποβρύχιος ἐγενόμην. Ἄβυσσος οὖν ὑδάτων πλῆθος πολύ.
Notes:
See also alpha 105.
[1] This comment on Ionian pronunciation comes from the scholiast on Aristophanes, Frogs 138, quoted later in the entry.
[2] In Homer, Odyssey, where βυσσοδομεύω occurs most frequently, it has the sense "brood over."
[3] cf. Etymologicum Magnum 4.44. These are principal parts of the verb βύω , which means "to stuff," followed by βυσός , which does not exist according to LSJ. Probably this is a mistake for βυσσός , "depth of the sea" (cf. beta 598, βυσσόν ). The Suda generally has little concern for the distinction between single and double consonants. The author thus seems to propose a very dubious etymology: that ἀ-βυσσος literally means "unstuffable" -- i.e., unable to be entered. [Ms M (= Marcianus 448) omits this sentence.]
[4] Aristophanes, Frogs 137-8 (web address 1).
[5] "Silver" [ἀργύριον ] is a neuter noun in Greek, while lake [λίμνη ] in the previous sentence is feminine; the point is that the same form ἄβυσσον is used with both. The sentence quoted here is actually part of a scholion to Aristophanes, Lysistrata 173 (web address 2); Aristophanes uses the phrase τὸ ἀργύριον τὸ ἄβυσσον in that line itself.
[6] Psalm 103:6 LXX. See again under pi 1083.
[7] Psalm 41:8 LXX.
[8] Referring to the continuation of Psalm 41:8 LXX, "all thy waves and thy billows are gone over me" (KJV).
[9] From Theodoret's commentary (PG 80.1173) on Psalm 41:8 LXX.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: Christianity; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; epic; geography; history; imagery; military affairs; proverbs; religion
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:02:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, added keywords, set status) on 5 February 2001@11:48:31.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@08:11:37.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 4 July 2003@08:14:49.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added links; cosmetics) on 14 December 2003@15:22:17.
David Whitehead (modified translation and notes 6-9) on 28 April 2004@11:16:41.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@00:15:00.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 19 April 2011@18:23:25.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 25 April 2011@04:11:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and note, after consulting with the translator) on 26 April 2011@17:14:37.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@03:45:27.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 21 November 2014@10:58:29.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 21 November 2014@11:44:30.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:36:21.

Headword: Ἀγαθὴ καὶ μάζα μετ' ἄρτον
Adler number: alpha,110
Translated headword: after bread a barley cake is good too
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In reference to those who give or take second-best.[1]
Μάζα [barley cake] has an acute [accent]; for a circumflex does not occur before the position of a long vowel.[2] Aristophanes, though, gives μάζα a circumflex: "bring, bring a barley cake for the dung-beetle as quick as you can."[3]
Greek Original:
Ἀγαθὴ καὶ μάζα μετ' ἄρτον: ἐπὶ τῶν τὰ δευτερεῖα διδόντων ἢ αἱρουμένων. μάζα ὀξεῖαν ἔχει: ἐπάνω γὰρ θέσει μακρᾶς περισπωμένη οὐ τίθεται: ὁ δὲ Ἀριστοφάνης περισπᾶ τὴν μάζαν: αἶρ' αἶρε μάζαν ὡς τάχιστα κανθάρῳ.
Notes:
All except the first sentence of this entry is reported by Adler as a marginal gloss in manuscripts A (= Parisinus 2625) and M (= Marcianus 448).
[1] cf. Zenobius 1.12.
[2] Yet in classical Attic, the final syllable is short, so the first syllable can have a circumflex: μᾶζα . See LSJ (web address 1).
[3] Aristophanes, Peace 1 (web address 2); again at alphaiota 280 and alphaiota 299. In the Aristophanes passage the word is not actually used for cakes of barley but for cakes of dung.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 30 March 2001@14:33:31.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; minor cosmetics) on 31 March 2001@03:05:31.
William Hutton (Augmented note) on 31 March 2001@08:40:31.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:25:33.
David Whitehead (modified end of translation; augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:28:04.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, status) on 4 July 2011@19:14:38.

Headword: Ἀγαθικά
Adler number: alpha,113
Translated headword: good things
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] excellent things.
Greek Original:
Ἀγαθικά: τὰ σπουδαῖα.
Notes:
Same entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha74 Theodoridis. The headword is neuter plural of the rare adjective ἀγαθικός ; outside lexica and grammars, it is attested only in Epicharmus fr. 99 Kaibel (now part of 97 Kassel-Austin), also a neuter plural, which may well have generated these entries.
The glossing adjective σπουδαῖος , translated here as 'excellent', can also mean serious, weighty, morally good, and various other such terms. See sigma 970; and web address 1 for the LSJ entry.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; philosophy
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 18 February 2000@15:25:00.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Augmented note, set status) on 5 June 2001@23:52:09.
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 19 December 2003@08:10:59.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@07:58:21.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 26 March 2008@00:26:20.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 22 December 2011@04:53:12.
Catharine Roth (added cross-reference) on 23 December 2011@22:46:03.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:41:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 2 January 2015@11:21:04.

Headword: Ἀγαθοῦ Δαίμονος
Adler number: alpha,122
Translated headword: of the Good Spirit
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The ancients had a custom after dinner of drinking 'of the Good Spirit', by taking an extra quaff of unmixed [wine]; and they call this 'of the Good Spirit',[1] but when they are ready to depart, 'of Zeus the Savior'. And this is what they called the second [day] of the month.[2] But there was also in Thebes a hero-shrine of the Good Spirit.
But others say that the first drinking vessel was called this.[3]
Aristotle composed a book On the Good in which he delineated the unwritten doctrines of Plato. Aristotle mentions the composition in the first [book] of On the Soul, calling it On Philosophy.[4]
Greek Original:
Ἀγαθοῦ Δαίμονος: ἔθος εἶχον οἱ παλαιοὶ μετὰ τὸ δεῖπνον πίνειν Ἀγαθοῦ Δαίμονος, ἐπιρροφοῦντες ἄκρατον, καὶ τοῦτο λέγειν Ἀγαθοῦ Δαίμονος, χωρίζεσθαι δὲ μέλλοντες, Διὸς Σωτῆρος. καὶ ἡμέραν δὲ τὴν δευτέραν τοῦ μηνὸς οὕτως ἐκάλουν. καὶ ἐν Θήβαις δὲ ἦν ἡρῷον Ἀγαθοῦ Δαίμονος. ἄλλοι δέ φασι τὸ πρῶτον ποτήριον οὕτω λέγεσθαι. ὅτι περὶ τἀγαθοῦ βιβλίον συντάξας Ἀριστοτέλης, τὰς ἀγράφους τοῦ Πλάτωνος δόξας ἐν αὐτῷ κατατάττει. καὶ μέμνηται τοῦ συντάγματος Ἀριστοτέλης ἐν τῷ πρώτῳ περὶ ψυχῆς, ἐπονομάζων αὐτὸ περὶ φιλοσοφίας.
Notes:
The first paragraph here is paralleled (in general terms) in Photius and other lexica, and also in the scholia to Aristophanes, Peace 300, where this genitive-case phrase occurs.
See also alpha 966.
[1] cf. Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 15.675B-C (15.17 Kaibel), where the G.S. is equated, not necessarily correctly, with Dionysos.
[2] cf. Hesychius s.v., and see generally J.D. Mikalson, The Sacred and Civil Calendar of the Athenian Year (Princeton 1975) 15 for this and other evidence and modern discussion (not confined to Athens).
[3] From alpha 966.
[4] Aristotle, de anima 404b19; cf. Alexander of Aphrodisias, Commentaries on Aristotle's Topics 75.32-35.
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; food; geography; philosophy; religion
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:18:44.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@03:46:05.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@07:23:37.

Headword: Ἀγαθῶν ἀγαθίδες
Adler number: alpha,123
Translated headword: skeins of good things
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The proverb is used in the comic poets in reference to a lot of good things.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] 'sea of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] 'anthills of good things', in reference to an abundance of good fortune.[3]
Also [sc. attested is] 'heap of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things and a lot of good fortune.[4]
Greek Original:
Ἀγαθῶν ἀγαθίδες: τάττεται ἡ παροιμία παρὰ τοῖς κωμικοῖς ἐπὶ τῶν πολλῶν ἀγαθῶν. καὶ Ἀγαθῶν θάλασσα, ἐπὶ πλήθους ἀγαθῶν. καὶ Ἀγαθῶν μυρμηκίαι, ἐπὶ πλήθους εὐδαιμονίας. καὶ Ἀγαθῶν σωρὸς, ἐπὶ πλήθους ἀγαθῶν καὶ πολλῆς εὐδαιμονίας.
Notes:
The wordplay of the headword phrase ἀγαθῶν ἀγαθίδες is hard to render in English. 'Bundles of bounties' might do.
[1] (Same material in Photius.) Again at alpha 2601; and see also nu 77 and tau 147.
[2] Again at pi 2049.
[3] Comica adespota fr. 827 Kock, now 796 K.-A.
[4] cf. Apostolius 1.5, etc.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; ethics; imagery; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:28:16.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; minor cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@03:44:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:09:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:28:42.
David Whitehead (corrected a ref) on 16 March 2012@07:56:43.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 December 2014@04:31:45.
David Whitehead (coding) on 12 July 2015@03:58:05.

Headword: Ἀγάθων
Adler number: alpha,124
Translated headword: Agathon
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name. He was a tragic poet; but he was slandered for effeminacy. Aristophanes [writes]:[1] "Where is Agathon?" -- "He's gone and left me." -- "Where on earth is the wretch?" -- "At a banquet of the blessed." This Agathon was good by nature, "missed by his friends" and brilliant at the dinner table. They say also that the Symposium of Plato was set at a dinner party of his, with many philosophers introduced all together. A comic poet [sic] of the school of Socrates. He was lampooned in comedy for womanliness.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάθων: ὄνομα κύριον. τραγικὸς δὲ ἦν: διεβέβλητο δὲ ἐπὶ μαλακίᾳ. Ἀριστοφάνης: Ἀγάθων δὲ ποῦ 'στιν; ἀπολιπών μ' οἴχεται. ποῖ γῆς ὁ τλήμων; ἐς μακάρων εὐωχίαν. οὗτος ὁ Ἀγάθων ἀγαθὸς ἦν τὸν τρόπον, ποθεινὸς τοῖς φίλοις καὶ τὴν τράπεζαν λαμπρός. φασὶ δὲ ὅτι καὶ Πλάτωνος Συμπόσιον ἐν ἑστιάσει αὐτοῦ γέγραπται, πολλῶν ἅμα φιλοσόφων παραχθέντων. κωμῳδιοποιὸς Σωκράτους διδασκαλείου. ἐκωμῳδεῖτο δὲ εἰς θηλύτητα.
Notes:
C5 BCE; OCD(4) s.v. (pp.37-7); TrGF 39. See also under alpha 125.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 83-85 (web address 1), with scholion; dialogue between Herakles and Dionysos. The phrase "missed by his friends", which the lexicographer uses below, is from the same source.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; ethics; food; gender and sexuality; philosophy; poetry; tragedy; women
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:48:08.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note, bibliography, keyword; cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@04:32:53.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:15:58.
Jennifer Benedict (added reference to link) on 26 March 2008@00:44:35.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:40:05.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:26:35.

Headword: Ἄγαλμα
Adler number: alpha,131
Translated headword: decoration, delight, ornament, statue
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Anything in which someone takes delight.[1]
"And he [A] gives silver, so that he [B] might complete the statue with the utmost artisanry, adding the size and prescribing the nature of the stone."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἄγαλμα: πᾶν ἐφ' ᾧ τις ἀγάλλεται. καὶ δίδωσιν ἀργύριον, ἵνα ἐκπονήσῃ τὸ ἄγαλμα ἄκρας τέχνης, προσθεὶς τὸ μέγεθος καὶ προσειπὼν τῆς λίθου τὴν φύσιν.
Notes:
See also alpha 132, alpha 133, alpha 135, alpha 136.
[1] Again under alpha 133. Also in Photius, other lexica, and various scholia (e.g. to Homer, Odyssey 8.509, and Aristophanes, Wasps 303).
[2] Aelian fr. 65b Domingo-Forasté (part of 62 Hercher), on an unscrupulous (but unnamed) sculptor.
Keywords: art history; comedy; definition; economics; epic; ethics; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 June 2000@01:06:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@09:59:18.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 18 February 2011@06:57:00.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@03:46:34.
Catharine Roth (updated reference in note 2) on 28 January 2012@19:11:34.

Headword: Ἀγάλματα
Adler number: alpha,133
Translated headword: delights, ornaments, statues
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the likenesses of the gods, and anything that is decorative in some way. Homer [writes]: "but it is stored away as a delight for the king."[1] And Hesiod calls a necklace an "ornament";[2] but Pindar uses this term for the decoration on a tomb,[3] and Euripides uses it for the adornments for corpses.[4]
Also something in which someone takes delight.[5]
Also [sc. a term for] image, wooden statue, delight, beauty, ornament, source of pride, palm leaves,[6] [human] statues, [honorific?] inscriptions.
Paintings and [human] statues are also called agalmata.[7]
agalmation [is] the diminutive form.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάλματα: τὰ τῶν θεῶν μιμήματα, καὶ πάντα τὰ κόσμου τινὸς μετέχοντα. Ὅμηρος: βασιλῆϊ δὲ κεῖται ἄγαλμα. καὶ Ἡσίοδος τὸν ὅρμον ἄγαλμα καλεῖ: Πίνδαρος δὲ τὴν ἐπὶ τάφου στήλην οὕτω καλεῖ, Εὐριπίδης τὸν ἐπὶ νεκροῖς κόσμον. καὶ ἐφ' ᾧ τις ἀγάλλεται. καὶ τὸ εἴδωλον, βρέτας, χάρμα, καλλονὴ, κόσμος, καύχημα, θαλλοὶ, ἀνδριάντες, ἐπιγραφαί. Ἀγάλματα δὲ καὶ τὰς γραφὰς καὶ τοὺς ἀνδριάντας λέγουσιν. Ἀγαλμάτιον δὲ ὑποκοριστικῶς.
Notes:
The (neuter) headword is the plural of alpha 131 (and cf. alpha 132). It is perhaps, though not necessarily, quoted from somewhere.
[1] Homer, Iliad 4.144 (web address 1), on an ivory cheek-piece for a horse.
[2] This fragment of Hesiod (142 Merkelbach-West, 233 Rzach) is not known from any other source. It may pertain to the story of Europa in the Catalogue of Women.
[3] Pindar, Nemean Odes 10.125 (67 Bowra): web address 2.
[4] Euripides, Alcestis 613: web address 3.
[5] Already at alpha 131.
[6] Used as prizes for victors in competition.
[7] Same material in Photius (Lexicon alpha92 Theodoridis) and elsewhere; cf. Kassel-Austin, PCG II p.365 (on Antiphanes fr.102).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: art history; athletics; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; poetry; religion; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 12 January 1999@12:39:04.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (cosmetics) on 29 June 2000@22:39:50.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 17 February 2003@05:54:38.
Jennifer Benedict (cleaned up links) on 26 March 2008@01:00:28.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:07:43.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7) on 16 August 2013@07:56:54.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7; another keyword) on 22 December 2014@04:58:33.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 6 November 2016@12:23:04.

Headword: Ἄγαμαι καρδίας
Adler number: alpha,138
Translated headword: I admire at heart
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
An Atticism, meaning I marvel [at].[1]
Aelian [writes]: "since, also, the [behaviour? remark?] of Menelaus to Paris the son of Priam I neither praise nor admire."[2]
"Personally I admire these men as well, and the Acarnanian most of all above these men. For he was eager to share with his men the things that he recognized they were going to suffer."[3]
Greek Original:
Ἄγαμαι καρδίας: Ἀττικῶς, ἀντὶ τοῦ θαυμάζω. Αἰλιανός: ἐπεὶ καὶ τὴν τοῦ Μενέλεω πρὸς τὸν τοῦ Πριάμου Πάριν οὔτε ἐπαινῶ οὔτε ἄγαμαι. ἐγὼ δὲ ἄγαμαι καὶ τούσδε τοὺς ἄνδρας: τὸν δὲ Ἀκαρνᾶνα μέγιστον καὶ πρὸ τούτων. ἃ γὰρ πεισομένους ἐγίνωσκε, τούτων ἐπεθύμησε τοῖς ἀνδράσι κοινωνῆσαι.
Notes:
[1] The headword phrase occurs at Aristophanes, Acharnians 489 (web address 1). For the comment, cf. Timaeus, Platonic Lexicon s.v. ἄγαμι .
[2] Aelian fr.125b Domingo-Forasté (122 Hercher). The allusion is presumably to something in Homer, Iliad 3 (where Menelaus and Paris fight a duel).
[3] Philostratus, Life of Apollonius of Tyana 4.23; again (in part) at alpha 805.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@00:16:18.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:39:43.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 25 April 2002@04:09:53.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; augmented n.2 and keywords) on 22 December 2006@08:55:11.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:04:38.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:57:51.
Catharine Roth (updated reference, upgraded link) on 28 January 2012@19:23:05.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 21 December 2014@19:38:34.

Headword: Ἄγαν ἐγκεῖσθαι τῷδε
Adler number: alpha,143
Translated headword: to be too vehement against someone
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
For instance to make accusations and to lambaste.
Greek Original:
Ἄγαν ἐγκεῖσθαι τῷδε: οἷον αἰτιᾶσθαι καὶ ἀποτείνεσθαι.
Note:
Fuller entry in Photius (Lexicon alpha104 Theodoridis) and elsewhere -- prompted by the use of this idiom (of the Spartans) in Aristophanes, Acharnians 309 (web address 1): οἷς ἄγαν ἐγκείμεθα .
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; ethics; geography
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@00:58:52.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:53:52.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:06:07.
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:53:31.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 23 December 2011@05:27:28.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:06:19.

Headword: Ἄγανον
Adler number: alpha,145
Translated headword: firewood, broken; good, gentle
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
With proparoxytone accent[1] [this means] wood that has been cut up.
Or brushwood and [wood that is] ready to be cut up.[2]
But some [sc. define it as wood] which is not chopped.
But with the oxytone[3] it means fine. Or good or kindly, though some [say] immortal. Whence also [comes the term] ἀγανοφροσύνη ["kindly-mindedness"].
Also [sc. attested is the verb] ἀγανοῦμεν ["we will make nice"],[4] meaning we will beautify.
And elsewhere: "however gentle you might pass into the Athenian book of death, you would always have your tresses well-garlanded."[5]
Greek Original:
Ἄγανον: προπαροξυτόνως τὸ κατεαγὸς ξύλον. ἢ τὸ φρυγανῶδες καὶ ἕτοιμον πρὸς τὸ κατεαγῆναι. οἱ δὲ τὸ ἀπελέκητον. Ἀγανὸν δὲ ὀξυτόνως καλόν. ἢ ἀγαθὸν ἢ ἱλαρὸν, οἱ δὲ ἀθάνατον. ἔνθεν καὶ ἀγανοφροσύνη. καὶ Ἀγανοῦμεν, ἀντὶ τοῦ κοσμήσομεν. καὶ αὖθις: ὡς ἄν τοι ῥείῃ μὲν ἀγανὸς Ἀτθίδι δέλτῳ κηρὸς, ὑπὸ στεφάνοις δ' αἰὲν ἔχοις πλοκάμους.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 146, alpha 147, alpha 148, alpha 149.
[1] i.e. ἄγανος (here neuter).
[2] Addendum lacking in mss ASM.
[3] i.e. ἀγανός (again, here neuter).
[4] Attested only here, but cf. the scholia to Aristophanes, Peace 398 (where ἀγαλοῦμεν occurs).
[5] Greek Anthology 7.36.5 (Erucius), on the tomb of Sophocles; cf. Gow and Page (252-253), alpha 1421, beta 453, and sigma 569.
Reference:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: botany; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@23:57:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@11:07:52.
Jennifer Benedict (tags) on 26 March 2008@01:08:32.
David Whitehead (augmented n.4; more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:01:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@05:41:50.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.5, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keyword) on 25 October 2018@15:42:25.

Headword: Ἀγανόφρονος
Adler number: alpha,146
Translated headword: kindly-minded
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"And the cheerful face of kindly-minded peace."[1] [Meaning] easygoing and gentle.
Greek Original:
Ἀγανόφρονος: τό τε τῆς ἀγανόφρονος ἡσυχίας εὐήμερον πρόσωπον. τῆς πράου καὶ προσηνοῦς.
Notes:
The headword, extracted from the quotation given, is genitive case.
cf. generally alpha 145, alpha 147, alpha 148, alpha 149.
[1] Aristophanes, Birds 1321 (web address 1 below), with scholion.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery
Translated by: William Hutton on 29 March 2000@00:02:48.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@11:13:36.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:09:24.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetic) on 27 March 2008@08:07:52.
David Whitehead on 23 December 2011@05:46:36.

Headword: Ἀγανώτερον
Adler number: alpha,149
Translated headword: milder, kindlier
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] more/rather desirable, more/rather gentle.
Greek Original:
Ἀγανώτερον: ποθεινότερον, πραότερον.
Note:
This is the comparative form of the adjective ἀγανός (alpha 145). From a scholion on Aristophanes, Lysistrata 886 (where it appears: web address 1).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2000@09:18:44.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead on 9 February 2001@11:23:30.
David Whitehead on 9 February 2001@11:26:02.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, cosmeticule) on 26 March 2008@01:15:11.
David Whitehead (x-ref; another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:11:44.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:13:19.

Headword: Ἀγαπησμός
Adler number: alpha,152
Translated headword: affection
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
They call friendliness "affection" and "lovingness". In Synaristosai ['Ladies Who Lunch'] Menander [writes]:[1] "and the affection, such as it was, for each other that arose from difficulty."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀγαπησμός: ἀγαπησμὸν λέγουσι καὶ ἀγάπησιν τὴν φιλοφρόνησιν. Συναριστώσαις Μένανδρος: καὶ τὸν ἐπὶ κακῷ γινόμενον ἀλλήλων ἀγαπησμὸν οἷος ἦν.
Notes:
Same entry in Photius (Lexicon alpha123 Theodoridis) and elsewhere.
[1] Menander fr. 453 Kock, 387 K.-Th., 338 K.-A.
[2] Or "to an evil end"?
Keywords: comedy; definition; ethics; women
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2000@09:15:11.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added reference; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@08:57:22.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords; cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@06:16:09.
David Whitehead (updated refs) on 16 August 2013@08:17:02.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@04:47:58.

Headword: Ἄγγαροι
Adler number: alpha,165
Translated headword: messengers
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those who carry letters in relays.[1] They are also [called] 'couriers' [ἀστάνδαι ].[2] The words [are] Persian. Aeschylus in Agamemnon [writes]: "beacon sent beacon hither with relaying fire."[3] The word is also used for conveyors of freight and more generally of inanimate objects and slaves. Also [sc. attested is] the [verb] ἀγγαροφορεῖν in reference to carrying burdens. And [the verb] ἀγγαρεύεσθαι means what we now speak of as being impressed to carry burdens and labor of that sort. Menander offers this example in the Sikyonios: "someone arriving by sea puts in? He is labelled an enemy. And if he has anything nice it's pressed into service [ἀγγαρεύεται ]."[4]
Greek Original:
Ἄγγαροι: οἱ ἐκ διαδοχῆς γραμματοφόροι. οἱ δὲ αὐτοὶ καὶ ἀστάνδαι. τὰ δὲ ὀνόματα Περσικά. Αἰσχύλος Ἀγαμέμνονι: φρυκτὸς δὲ φρυκτὸν δεῦρο ἀπ' ἀγγάρου πυρὸς ἔπεμπε. τίθεται τὸ ὄνομα καὶ ἐπὶ τῶν φορτηγῶν καὶ ὅλως τῶν ἀναισθήτων καὶ ἀνδραποδωδῶν. καὶ τὸ Ἀγγαροφορεῖν ἐπὶ τοῦ φορτία φέρειν. καὶ Ἀγγαρεύεσθαι καλοῦσιν ὥσπερ ἡμεῖς νῦν τὸ εἰς φορτηγίαν καὶ τοιαύτην τινὰ ὑπηρεσίαν ἄγεσθαι. Μένανδρος καὶ τοῦτο ἐν τῷ Σικυωνίῳ παρίστησιν: ὁ πλέων κατήχθη; κρίνεθ' οὗτος πολέμιος. ἐὰν ἔχῃ τὶ μαλακὸν, ἀγγαρεύεται.
Notes:
Same entry in Photius, similar ones elsewhere.
LSJ entry at web address 1. See also alpha 162, alpha 163, alpha 164.
[1] cf. Herodotus 3.126 (web address 2) and esp. 8.98 (web address 3).
[2] cf. alpha 4420. The word appears also at Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 3.122A (3.94 Kaibel); Eustathius Commentaries on Homer's Odyssey vol. 2 p. 189.6; Hesychius alpha7814; Plutarch, Alexander 18 (bis); De Alex. fort. virt. 326E; 340C.
[3] Aeschylus, Agamemnon 282f. (web address 4), where the mss have ἀγγέλου , an obvious gloss.
[4] Menander, Sikyonios fr.4 Sandbach [= fr 440 Kock].
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3,
Web address 4
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; military affairs; science and technology; tragedy; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:13:42.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified translation, added cross-references, keywords, links, set status) on 5 July 2001@12:26:03.
William Hutton (Fixed faulty linksz) on 5 July 2001@12:31:12.
Catharine Roth (added keyword and link; cosmetic) on 5 July 2001@13:14:47.
Anne Mahoney (make the Greek beta-code) on 6 July 2001@11:37:41.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:14:56.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, reordered links, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@01:38:57.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:32:31.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@08:14:35.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 12 August 2013@22:38:38.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 12 August 2013@23:22:50.
David Whitehead (tweaked a ref) on 14 January 2015@03:18:54.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:40:43.

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