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Headword: *)abasa/nistos
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
*)abasa/nistos: a)gu/mnastos h)\ a)nece/tastos, a)doki/mastos. ei)/rhtai de\ a)po\ th=s basa/nou th=s xrusoxoi+kh=s li/qou, e)n h(=| dokima/zousi to\ xrusi/on. e)xrh/sato de\ *ai)liano\s e)n tw=| peri\ pronoi/as tw=| a)basa/nistos a)nti\ tou= a)/neu o)du/nhs.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] ba/sanos can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.

Headword: *)aga/lmata
Adler number: alpha,133
Translated headword: delights, ornaments, statues
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the likenesses of the gods, and anything that is decorative in some way. Homer [writes]: "but it is stored away as a delight for the king."[1] And Hesiod calls a necklace an "ornament";[2] but Pindar uses this term for the decoration on a tomb,[3] and Euripides uses it for the adornments for corpses.[4]
Also something in which someone takes delight.[5]
Also [sc. a term for] image, wooden statue, delight, beauty, ornament, source of pride, palm leaves,[6] [human] statues, [honorific?] inscriptions.
Paintings and [human] statues are also called agalmata.[7]
agalmation [is] the diminutive form.
Greek Original:
*)aga/lmata: ta\ tw=n qew=n mimh/mata, kai\ pa/nta ta\ ko/smou tino\s mete/xonta. *(/omhros: basilh=i+ de\ kei=tai a)/galma. kai\ *(hsi/odos to\n o(/rmon a)/galma kalei=: *pi/ndaros de\ th\n e)pi\ ta/fou sth/lhn ou(/tw kalei=, *eu)ripi/dhs to\n e)pi\ nekroi=s ko/smon. kai\ e)f' w(=| tis a)ga/lletai. kai\ to\ ei)/dwlon, bre/tas, xa/rma, kallonh\, ko/smos, kau/xhma, qalloi\, a)ndria/ntes, e)pigrafai/. *)aga/lmata de\ kai\ ta\s grafa\s kai\ tou\s a)ndria/ntas le/gousin. *)agalma/tion de\ u(pokoristikw=s.
Notes:
The (neuter) headword is the plural of alpha 131 (and cf. alpha 132). It is perhaps, though not necessarily, quoted from somewhere.
[1] Homer, Iliad 4.144 (web address 1), on an ivory cheek-piece for a horse.
[2] This fragment of Hesiod (142 Merkelbach-West, 233 Rzach) is not known from any other source. It may pertain to the story of Europa in the Catalogue of Women.
[3] Pindar, Nemean Odes 10.125 (67 Bowra): web address 2.
[4] Euripides, Alcestis 613: web address 3.
[5] Already at alpha 131.
[6] Used as prizes for victors in competition.
[7] Same material in Photius (Lexicon alpha92 Theodoridis) and elsewhere; cf. Kassel-Austin, PCG II p.365 (on Antiphanes fr.102).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: art history; athletics; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; poetry; religion; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 12 January 1999@12:39:04.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (cosmetics) on 29 June 2000@22:39:50.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 17 February 2003@05:54:38.
Jennifer Benedict (cleaned up links) on 26 March 2008@01:00:28.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:07:43.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7) on 16 August 2013@07:56:54.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7; another keyword) on 22 December 2014@04:58:33.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 6 November 2016@12:23:04.

Headword: *(agistei/as
Adler number: alpha,242
Translated headword: rituals
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning those] of holiness, of cleansing, of service.
Greek Original:
*(agistei/as: a(giwsu/nhs, kaqaro/thtos, latrei/as.
Notes:
LSJ entry at web address 1; and cf. generally alpha 234.
Same material in other lexica (references at Photius alpha176 Theodoridis), and also in the scholia to Plato, Axiochus 371D, where the headword -- accusative plural, not genitive singular -- occurs.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; philosophy; religion
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@14:18:45.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added headword translation, note, keywords, and link.) on 18 February 2001@20:06:16.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note and keyword) on 9 June 2003@09:51:41.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 4 January 2012@04:55:36.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@07:55:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 November 2020@00:51:21.

Headword: *)agku/risma
Adler number: alpha,261
Translated headword: anchor-hold
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] a kind of wrestling-move. Also [sc. attested is the related participle] a)gkuri/sas, meaning [someone] wrestling down or taking down by the knee. An 'anchor-hold' is also a hunter's container of figs.[1] Aristophanes [writes]: "striking, anchoring, then turning his shoulder, you swallowed him up."[2] That is, you smote [him].
Greek Original:
*)agku/risma: ei)=dos palai/smatos. kai\ *)agkuri/sas, a)nti\ tou= katapalai/sas h)\ th=| a)gku/lh| katabalw/n. e)/sti de\ a)gku/risma kai\ skeu=os a)greutiko\n su/kwn. *)aristofa/nhs: diabalw\n, a)gkuri/sas, ei)=t' a)postre/yas to\n w)=mon, au)to\n e)kola/bhsas. toute/sti prose/krousas.
Notes:
[1] This meaning is not attested in LSJ (web address 1 below). Perhaps it stems from a misunderstanding of the Aristophanes passage about to be quoted, where in addition to applying the anchor-hold, Kleon is charged with squeezing treasury officials like ripe figs.
[2] Aristophanes, Knights 262-3 (web address 2), with comment from the scholia there.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: athletics; botany; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food; history; imagery
Translated by: Roger Travis on 4 October 2000@12:34:39.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, added note and link to LSJ, added keywords, set status) on 18 June 2001@01:28:37.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added keyword; restorative and other cosmetics) on 4 May 2003@07:28:30.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@09:01:44.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@07:58:17.

Headword: *)/agos
Adler number: alpha,314
Translated headword: pollution, leader
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Pollution, or elbow.[1] What is honourable and worthy of reverence is also called agos; hence priesthoods [are called] all-holy [panageis], and a number of other things.[2]
Thucydides [writes]: "the Spartans sent envoys to Athens demanding the expulsion of the goddess's curse [agos]. It was that against Cylon, the ancient Athenian Olympic victor. [...] And they banished the accursed [enageis]."[3]
But agos when oxytone [means] leader.[4]
Greek Original:
*)/agos: mi/asma, h)\ a)gkw/n. le/getai de\ a)/gos kai\ to\ ti/mion kai\ a)/cion seba/smatos, e)c ou(= kai\ ai( i(e/reiai panagei=s, kai\ a)/lla tina/. *qoukudi/dhs: pe/myantes oi( *lakedaimo/nioi pre/sbeis e)ke/leuon tou\s *)aqhnai/ous to\ a)/gos e)lau/nein th=s qeou=. h)=n de\ to\ kata\ *ku/lwna to\n *)olumpioni/khn to\n *)aqhnai=on to\n pa/lai. kai\ h)/lasan tou\s e)nagei=s. *)ago\s de\ o)cuto/nws o( h(gemw/n.
Notes:
The opening material here is also in Photius and other lexica.
[1] The second gloss here is a mistake (perhaps by confusion with the following entry, where the same word, a)gkw/n, is translated 'embrace').
[2] An a)/gos is "any matter of religious awe": LSJ s.v.; see also pi 150.
[3] Thucydides 1.126.2-12 (web address 1), here so drastically abridged as to be misleading. (This banishment was part of the events of 632 BCE, now relevant two centuries later in the build-up to the Peloponnesian War. The original 'accursed' had returned -- and nobody was banished in 432.)
[4] From Philoponus, Differences. (For this epic/poetic noun see LSJ s.v.)
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: athletics; biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; politics; religion
Translated by: Malcolm Heath on 7 July 1999@10:54:13.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered headword, cosmetics, raised status) on 21 October 2000@16:02:46.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2003@08:40:55.
Catharine Roth (tweaked notes, added cross-reference and link) on 23 April 2008@15:19:18.
David Whitehead (expanded notes; more keywords; cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@04:34:35.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 6 January 2012@12:22:26.

Headword: *)agw/n
Adler number: alpha,327
Translated headword: contest, training, arena
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Training with a view to competitions.[1] [sc. Also attested is the accusative case] a)gw=na; and Homer [sc. uses this term for] the actual place where the competition takes place.[2] Thucydides in [book] 5 [writes]: "he came into the arena and garlanded the charioteer."[3]
Greek Original:
*)agw/n: h( pro\s tou\s a)gw=nas a)/skhsis. *)agw=na: kai\ *(/omhros to\n to/pon au)to\n e)n w(=| a)gwni/zontai. *qoukudi/dhs pe/mpth|: proelqw\n e)s to\n a)gw=na a)ne/dhse to\n h(ni/oxon.
Notes:
Apart from the initial glossing (on which see next note), this material also occurs in Photius, Lexicon alpha316 Theodoridis.
[1] The word used for 'competitions' here is the (accusative) plural of the headword itself. The Suda seems therefore to be saying, indirectly, that the word denotes both competition and the training for it.
[2] i.e. the arena. Adler cites Homer, Iliad 23.273 for this; Theodoridis chooses Odyssey 8.260. For instances in other authors (including the one about to be quoted here) see LSJ s.v. a)gw/n I.2.
[3] Thucydides 5.50.4, on Lichas the Spartan.
Keywords: athletics; biography; botany; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; historiography; history
Translated by: Malcolm Heath on 7 July 1999@11:00:05.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered headword, augmented notes.) on 24 October 2000@11:56:35.
William Hutton (Corrected my own error, raised status.) on 24 October 2000@11:57:26.
William Hutton on 24 October 2000@21:20:16.
David Whitehead (cosmetics in footnote 1) on 25 October 2000@03:07:38.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords) on 9 February 2003@09:01:04.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@06:26:01.
David Whitehead on 19 August 2013@04:21:37.

Headword: *)agwna/rxai
Adler number: alpha,328
Translated headword: contest-judges
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Sophocles [writes]: "and lest any contest-judges or he who is my destroyer should give my arms to the Achaeans."[1]
Also [sc. attested is] a proverb: "a contest does not accept excuses."[2] It is applied to those who have not profited at all if they made excuses.
Also [sc. attested is] "a contest does not wait for a pretext."[3] The proverb [is used] in reference to those who are by nature lazy and neglectful; alternatively to those who do not believe the words of those making pretexts.
Greek Original:
*)agwna/rxai: *sofoklh=s: kai\ ta)ma\ teu/xh mh/t' a)gwna/rxai tine\s qh/sous' *)axaioi=s mh/q' o( lumew\n e)mo/s. kai\ paroimi/a: *)agw\n ou) de/xetai skh/yeis. ta/ttetai e)pi\ tw=n mhde\n o)niname/nwn ei) skh/yainto. kai\ *)agw\n pro/fasin ou)k a)name/nei. h( paroimi/a e)pi\ tw=n fu/sei r(a|qu/mwn kai\ a)melw=n: h)\ e)pi\ tw=n mh\ prosieme/nwn tou\s lo/gous tw=n profasizome/nwn.
Notes:
[1] Sophocles, Ajax 572-3 (web address 1 below); again at lambda 839.
[2] (Also in the paroemiographers, e.g. Apostolius 1.25.) Possibly Contest, the divine personification of the agon (cf. Pausanias 5.26.3), though the apparently personifying language does not guarantee this. See further, next note.
[3] Used in Plato, Cratylus 421D (where a scholiast cited Aristophanes fr. 321 Kock as an earlier attestation of it) and Laws 751D. Also in the paroemiographers, e.g. Gregorius 1.11.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: athletics; comedy; daily life; ethics; philosophy; proverbs; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 18 March 2001@14:50:17.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented and modified notes; added keywords) on 19 March 2001@04:07:49.
Jennifer Benedict (Updated link to Perseus) on 11 March 2008@23:49:24.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 12 March 2008@04:23:38.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@06:29:38.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 January 2012@12:38:35.
David Whitehead (typo) on 16 June 2013@10:53:36.

Headword: *)agwniou/menoi
Adler number: alpha,333
Translated headword: about to be contenders
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning they who are] about to enter contests.
"About to be contenders, they might not avert their enemies without a fight."[1]
Greek Original:
*)agwniou/menoi: ei)s a)gw=nas e)mbalou=ntes. tou\s polemi/ous a)gwniou/menoi a)potra/pointo a)maxei/.
Notes:
The headword is future participle, masculine nominative plural, of the verb a)gwni/zomai. It is perhaps extracted from the quotation given, though not demonstrably so, and there are plenty of alternatives (beginning with Thucydides, Xenophon and Plato).
[1] Quotation unidentifiable, but evidently from (or connected with) a war narrative. This brings out the point that the verb in question has military as well as athletic overtones.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; imagery; military affairs; philosophy
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 16 March 2001@10:31:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 17 March 2001@05:08:28.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 20 February 2011@09:20:32.
David Whitehead on 6 January 2012@06:46:52.
David Whitehead (augmented primary note; cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@09:20:03.

Headword: *)agw/nisma
Adler number: alpha,336
Translated headword: achievement, prize
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] effort, diligence.[1]
"An achievement is there for him to take".[2]
Aristophanes [writes]: "personally, I would like to meet some ("wild beast" is left out) and take an achievement worthy of the journey."[3]
A prize.
Greek Original:
*)agw/nisma: spoudh/n, e)pime/leian. a)gw/nisma ti/qetai sullabei=n au)to/n. *)aristofa/nhs: e)gw\ d' eu)cai/mhn a)\n e)ntuxei=n tini [lei/pei qhri/w|] labei=n t' a)gw/nism' a)/cio/n ti th=s o(dou=. e)/paqlon.
Notes:
[1] This glossing shows that the headword, a neuter noun, is in the accusative case, and thus extracted from somewhere other than the quotation about to be given (where it is nominative).
[2] Quotation (also in the Lexicon Vindobonense) unidentifiable.
[3] Aristophanes, Frogs 283-4 (web address 1 below). For the sense of a)gw/nisma here (both a struggle and its reward) Dover ad loc. compares Thucydides 7.59.2 (web address 2 below).
Reference:
Aristophanes, Frogs, edited with introduction and commentary by K.J. Dover (Oxford 1993)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: athletics; biography; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; imagery; zoology
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 20 March 2001@15:31:38.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword; completed translation; modified and augmented notes) on 21 March 2001@03:27:33.
Jennifer Benedict (Added links) on 11 March 2008@23:57:53.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@06:57:04.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 March 2015@00:44:32.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 9 April 2015@09:33:56.

Headword: *)agwnoqe/ths
Adler number: alpha,338
Translated headword: agonothete
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The man [engaged] in [organising] the theatrical [competitions]; but athlothete [is] the man [engaged] in [organising] the athletic [competitions].
Greek Original:
*)agwnoqe/ths: o( e)n toi=s skhnikoi=s, *)aqloqe/ths de\ o( e)n toi=s gumnikoi=s.
Note:
An interesting distinction, but uncorroborated outside lexicography.
Keywords: athletics; comedy; daily life; definition; stagecraft; tragedy
Translated by: Malcolm Heath on 7 July 1999@13:32:15.
Vetted by:
Elizabeth Vandiver on 14 December 1999@16:13:16.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note and keywords) on 11 July 2003@10:10:27.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added keyword) on 28 September 2005@18:05:21.
David Whitehead on 6 January 2012@07:02:41.

Headword: *)aqh/naios
Adler number: alpha,731
Translated headword: Athenaios, Athenaeus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Of Naucratis.[1] Grammarian. Lived in the time of Marcus. He wrote a book with the title Deipnosophists, in which he records how many of the ancients had a reputation for munificence in giving banquets.[2]
Alexander the Great, after that naval victory over the Spartans and after he had fortified the Peiraeus, sacrificed a hecatomb and feasted all the Athenians.[3] And after his Olympic victory Alcibiades gave a feast for the whole festival.[4] Leophron did the same at the Olympic games.[5] And Empedocles of Acragas, being a Pythagorean and an abstainer from animal food, when he won an Olympic victory made an ox out of incense, myrrh and expensive perfumes and divided it among those who came to the festival. And Ion of Chios, when he won a victory in the tragic competition at Athens, gave every Athenian a jar of Chian [sc. wine].[6] And Tellias of Acragas, a hospitable man, when 500 horsemen were billeted with him during the winter, gave each of them a cloak and tunic.[7] [It is on record] that Charmus of Syracuse used to utter little verses and proverbs for every one of the dishes served at his banquets. Clearchus of Soli calls the poem Deipnology, others Opsology, Chrysippus Gastronomy, others The Life of Luxury [Hedupatheia].[8] [It is on record] that in Plato's symposium there were 28 diners.
Greek Original:
*)aqh/naios, *naukrati/ths, grammatiko\s, gegonw\s e)pi\ tw=n xro/nwn *ma/rkou. e)/graye bibli/on o)/noma *deipnosofistai/: e)n w(=| mnhmoneu/ei, o(/soi tw=n palaiw=n megaloyu/xws e)/docan e(stia=n. o( me/gas *)ale/candros ka)kei/nhn nikh/sas naumaxi/an *lakedaimoni/ous kai\ teixi/sas to\n *peiraia= kai\ e(kato/mbhn qu/sas pa/ntas ei(sti/asen *)aqhnai/ous. kai\ *)alkibia/dhs *)olu/mpia nikh/sas th\n panh/gurin a(/pasan ei(sti/ase. to\ au)to\ kai\ *leo/frwn *)olumpia/si. kai\ *)empedoklh=s o( *)akraganti=nos, *puqagoriko\s w)\n kai\ e)myu/xwn a)pexo/menos, *)olu/mpia nikh/sas, e)k libanwtou= kai\ smu/rnhs kai\ tw=n polutelw=n a)rwma/twn bou=n a)napla/sas die/neime toi=s ei)s th\n panh/gurin a)panth/sasi. kai\ o( *xi=os *)/iwn tragw|di/an nikh/sas *)aqh/nhsin e(ka/stw| tw=n *)aqhnai/wn e)/dwke *xi=on kera/mion. kai\ o( *)akraganti=nos *telli/as filo/cenos w)\n katalu/sasi/ pote f# i(ppeu=sin w(/ra| xeimw=nos, e)/dwken e(ka/stw| xitw=na kai\ i(ma/tion. o(/ti *xa/rmos o( *surakou/sios ei)s e(/kaston tw=n e)n toi=s dei/pnois paratiqeme/nwn stixi/dia kai\ paroimi/as e)/lege. *kle/arxos de\ o( *soleu\s deipnologi/an kalei= to\ poi/hma, a)/lloi o)yologi/an, *xru/sippos gastronomi/an, a)/lloi h(dupa/qeian. o(/ti e)n tw=| sumposi/w| *pla/twnos kh# h)=san daitumo/nes.
Notes:
Fl. c. AD 200. See generally RE Athenaios(22); NP Athenaios(3); OCD4 Athenaeus(1); Olson (2006), vii.
[1] In Egypt (see nu 58).
[2] cf. delta 359, sigma 1397. What follows is excerpted from Athenaeus 1.3D-4A [1.5 Kaibel], 4E (epit.).
[3] Two of Athenaeus' examples (3D) have been run together here (and again at alpha 1123): the 'naval victory over the Spartans' refers to Conon's victory at Cnidus (394 BC).
[4] cf. alpha 1280 (end).
[5] Athenaeus says (3E) that Simonides wrote a victory ode commemorating this (PMG 515, and Olson, 2006, 15 n.34).
[6] cf. iota 487 (end) and chi 314. On "Chian" and other wines with specific (though not necessarily simple) city-connections see A. Dalby, "Topikos Oinos", in D. Harvey and J. Wilkins (eds.), The Rivals of Aristophanes (London 2000) 397-405.
[7] cf. tau 272.
[8] cf. chi 132. The poem in question was in fact by Archestratus of Gela; see discussion of the title (most probably Hedypatheia in S. D. Olson and A. Sens (eds.), Archestratos of Gela: Greek Culture and Cuisine in the Fourth Century BCE(Oxford 2000) xxii-xxiv.
References:
D. Braund and J. Wilkins, eds. Athenaeus and his World. Exeter, 2000
S.D. Olson, Athenaeus: The Learned Banqueters (Loeb Classical Library: 2006-)
Keywords: architecture; athletics; biography; chronology; clothing; economics; food; geography; historiography; history; military affairs; philosophy; proverbs; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Malcolm Heath on 7 July 1999@14:13:15.
Vetted by:
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added transliteration to headword) on 14 August 2000@14:39:21.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 15 June 2001@06:09:35.
David Whitehead (augmented note 6) on 3 August 2001@10:02:27.
David Whitehead (augmented initial note; added bibliography; cosmetics) on 11 October 2002@03:28:29.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added italics; cosmetics) on 12 February 2005@22:01:08.
Aikaterini Oikonomopoulou (Augmented and corrected notes; added bibliography) on 21 February 2008@14:05:08.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 22 February 2008@04:03:13.
David Whitehead (tweaked bibliographical item) on 20 January 2012@04:12:30.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 19 January 2014@07:25:01.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 July 2014@08:24:54.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 22 November 2014@22:08:06.
David Whitehead (expanded a ref) on 14 January 2015@03:48:39.

Headword: *)aqlhta/s
Adler number: alpha,740
Translated headword: athletes
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] competitors, men in training.[1]
Aelian [uses the word].[2] "Consequently he not only prepared them to have these things, but he also created athletes in other [kinds of] injustice and filthiness. For what shameful or terrible thing was not present? And what good and wholesome thing was not absent?"[3]
Greek Original:
*)aqlhta/s: a)gwnista\s, a)skhta/s. *ai)liano/s: toigarou=n ou) mo/non tau=t' e)/xein au)tou\s pareskeu/azen, a)lla\ kai\ th=s a)/llhs a)diki/as kai\ bdeluri/as a)qlhta\s pareskeu/azen. ti/ ga\r tw=n ai)sxrw=n kai\ deinw=n au)toi=s ou) prosh=n; h)\ ti/ tw=n kalw=n kai\ spoudai/wn ou)k a)ph=n;
Notes:
[1] cf. generally alpha 741, alpha 4170. The present headword (+ gloss) is accusative plural, presumably extracted from the quotation given -- on which see next two notes.
[2] Perhaps in De natura animalium 4.1. Not, at any rate, in the quotation which now follows: see next note.
[3] Polybius 8.9.8-9, himself quoting Theopompus (FGrH 115 F225; cf. Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 6.260E = 6.77 Kaibel), on the hetairoi of Philip II of Macedon.
Reference:
C. de Boor, "Suidas und die Konstantinsche Exzerptsammlung I." Byzantinische Zeitschrift 21 (1912) 418
Keywords: athletics; biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; imagery
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 18 December 1999@09:41:39.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 January 2001@06:33:54.
David Whitehead on 25 January 2001@06:35:18.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 14 February 2001@04:22:30.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 12 May 2006@08:34:11.
Catharine Roth (tweaks, bibliography, keyword) on 27 December 2009@01:01:08.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2; tweaks) on 20 January 2012@04:52:36.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 21 January 2012@12:21:06.
David Whitehead (punctuation) on 22 January 2012@04:29:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 November 2014@21:56:45.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 30 November 2014@03:46:30.
David Whitehead (expanded a ref) on 14 January 2015@03:30:25.
David Whitehead (typo) on 14 January 2015@03:31:10.

Headword: *)aqlhth/s
Adler number: alpha,741
Translated headword: athlete, champion
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The man trained thoroughly in [sc. winning] prizes.
"The Romans dispatched a man [who was] a champion of wars like[1] Hannibal".[2]
Greek Original:
*)aqlhth/s: o( tou\s a)/qlous e)chskhkw/s. oi( de\ *(rwmai=oi a)/ndra pole/mwn a)qlhth\n w(s to\n *)anni/ban e)kpe/mpousin.
Notes:
See also alpha 740 (and alpha 742).
[1] Or: against.
[2] Quotation unidentifiable. (Polybius and Diodorus have both been suggested.) For Hannibal, see generally alpha 2452.
Keywords: athletics; biography; definition; historiography; history; imagery; military affairs
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 20 December 1999@17:03:49.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; added notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 January 2001@06:54:36.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 12 May 2006@08:31:15.
David Whitehead (x-ref; more keywords; raised status) on 7 February 2011@10:25:37.
David Whitehead (more x-refs) on 20 January 2012@04:55:27.

Headword: *)=aqlon
Adler number: alpha,742
Translated headword: prize
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] an object of competition, the honour, the recompense, the winning of the contest. Also [sc. attested is] a)=qlos, masculine, [meaning] both the deed and the object of competition and the reward. This differs from the neuter [in] that while the neuter properly indicates the prize, this [masculine indicates] the contest.
Greek Original:
*)=aqlon: a)gw/nisma, h( timh\, o( misqo\s, to\ tou= a)gw=nos brabei=on. kai\ *)=aqlos a)rsenikw=s, to\ e)/rgon kai\ to\ a)gw/nisma kai\ to\ e)/paqlon. diafe/rei de\ tou=to tou= ou)dete/rou, o(/ti to\ me\n ou)de/teron dhloi= kuri/ws to\ e)/paqlon, tou=to de\ to\n a)gw=na.
Note:
Same material in other lexica (references at Photius alpha476 and alpha477 Theodoridis), and cf. also the scholia to Thucydides 1.6.5 (where the neuter plural occurs: web address 1).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 15 February 2000@22:01:30.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; added keywords; cosmetics) on 25 January 2001@07:04:53.
David Whitehead (added note and another keyword; cosmetics) on 12 May 2006@08:28:59.
Catharine Roth (link, typo, status) on 20 August 2007@11:30:38.
David Whitehead (tweaked note; another keyword) on 20 January 2012@04:56:57.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 21 January 2012@12:23:51.
David Whitehead on 19 August 2013@06:49:45.
David Whitehead on 1 May 2015@10:56:15.

Headword: *)akadhmi/a
Adler number: alpha,774
Translated headword: Academy
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A place of exercise in Athens, a wooded suburb in which Plato used to spend his time; named after Hekademos, a hero. It was formerly called the Hecademy, [spelled] with epsilon.[1]
Aristophanes in Clouds [writes]: "but going down into the Academy, you will run crowned with pale reeds under the sacred olives with a sound-minded age-mate, smelling of bindweed and quietude and the bright falling leaves, delighting in the season of spring, when the plane tree whispers to the elm."[2]
Greek Original:
*)akadhmi/a: gumna/sion e)n *)aqh/nais, proa/steion a)lsw=des e)n w(=| die/tribe *pla/twn, a)po\ *(ekadh/mou tino\s h(/rwos o)nomasqe/n. pro/teron de\ dia\ tou= e *(ekadhmi/a e)kalei=to. *)aristofa/nhs *nefe/lais: a)ll' ei)s *(ekadhmi/an katiw\n, u(po\ tai=s mori/ais a)poqre/ceis stefanwsa/menos kala/mw| leukw=| meta\ sw/fronos h(likiw/tou, mi/lakos o)/zwn kai\ a)pragmosu/nhs kai\ leu/khs fullobolou/shs, h)=ros e)n w(/ra| xai/rwn, o(po/t' a)\n pla/tanos ptele/a| yiquri/zh|.
Notes:
See also alpha 775, and generally OCD(4) pp.2 ('Academy') and 638 ('gymnasium').
[1] From Diogenes Laertius 3.7-8 (= schol. Demosth. 24.114); cf. epsilon 338. See also (e.g.) Pausanias 1.29.2, 1.30.1-3.
[2] Aristophanes, Clouds 1005-1008; cf. alpha 3682, mu 1058, mu 1248.
References:
Baltes, Matthias. "Plato's School, the Academy," Hermathena 155 (1993) 3-26
Dancy, R.M. Two Studies in the Early Academy (SUNY Press, New York: 1991)
Dorandi, T. "Four Testimonia on the Academy," Classical Quarterly 38 (1988) 576-578
Keywords: aetiology; athletics; biography; botany; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; imagery; philosophy; religion
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 13 January 2000@00:44:18.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation, augmented notes and bibliography) on 19 September 2000@05:09:45.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 May 2002@05:48:43.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added italics) on 28 September 2005@18:15:54.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr) on 22 July 2009@03:35:24.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 22 January 2012@08:00:19.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 July 2014@03:40:46.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation) on 27 November 2016@22:39:55.

Headword: *)akampi/as
Adler number: alpha,795
Translated headword: bendless, unbending
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] straight-coursed.
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] a)ka/mpios dro/mos ["bendless course"],[1] a long and straight walk.
Greek Original:
*)akampi/as: o( eu)qu/dromos. kai\ *)aka/mpios dro/mos, o( makro\s kai\ di' eu)qei/as peri/patos.
Notes:
Similar material in other lexica; references at Photius alpha709 and alpha710 Theodoridis. From the vocabulary of racing, whether equestrian or on foot. See LSJ s.v.
[1] cf. kappa 292 for the opposite.
Keywords: athletics; daily life; definition; proverbs
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 16 February 2000@11:26:40.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 24 May 2002@06:57:35.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetic) on 13 July 2006@06:13:53.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 January 2012@05:12:01.
David Whitehead on 23 January 2012@05:12:17.
David Whitehead on 19 August 2013@07:25:54.

Headword: *)akoniti/
Adler number: alpha,923

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