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Headword: *)/abel
Adler number: alpha,30
Translated headword: Abel
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Son of Adam.[1] This man was chaste and just from the beginning and a shepherd of flocks; out of these he offered a sacrifice to God and was accepted, but was then killed because he was envied by his brother Cain.[2] Cain happened to be a farmer and after the judgement he lived worse, with groaning and trembling. For Abel, by dedicating the firstborn [of the flock] to God, recommended himself as more God-loving than self-loving,[3] and because this was a good choice, he was accepted. But Cain impiously kept his first-fruits for himself and gave the seconds to God, and for this reason was rightly rejected. For it says: "and after some days it happened that Cain offered from the fruits of the earth."[4] Cain was disgraced by the fact that the produce he offered was not the first-fruits but that which was some days old and second-best.
Greek Original:
*)/abel: ui(o\s *)ada/m. ou(=tos parqe/nos kai\ di/kaios u(ph=rxe kai\ poimh\n proba/twn: e)c w(=n kai\ qusi/an tw=| qew=| prosagagw\n kai\ dexqei\s a)nairei=tai, fqonhqei\s u(po\ tou= a)delfou= au)tou= *ka/i+n. o( *ka/i+n de\ gewrgo\s tugxa/nwn kai\ meta\ th\n di/khn xeiro/nws biw/sas ste/nwn kai\ tre/mwn h)=n. o( ga\r *)/abel ta\ prwto/toka tw=| qew=| kaqierw=n filo/qeon ma=llon h)\ fi/lauton e(auto\n suni/sth, o(/qen kai\ dia\ th=s a)gaqh=s au)tou= proaire/sews a)pede/xqh. o( de\ *ka/i+n dussebw=s e(autw=| a)pone/mwn ta\ prwtogennh/mata, qew=| de\ ta\ deu/tera, ei)ko/tws kai\ a)peblh/qh. fhsi\ ga/r: kai\ e)ge/neto meq' h(me/ras, prosh/negke *ka/i+n a)po\ tw=n karpw=n th=s gh=s. w(/ste dia\ tou=to *ka/i+n e)le/gxetai, o(/ti mh\ ta\ a)kroqi/nia gennh/mata prosh/negke tw=| qew=|, a)lla\ ta\ meq' h(me/ras kai\ deu/tera.
Notes:
George the Monk, Chronicon 6.10-7.16.
[1] alpha 425.
[2] kappa 27.
[3] Again at sigma 1580.
[4] Genesis 4:3.
Keywords: agriculture; biography; botany; Christianity; daily life; ethics; food; historiography; religion; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:57:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, keywords, set status) on 27 January 2001@12:23:00.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 27 February 2003@08:28:31.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 8 September 2003@06:15:32.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 October 2005@10:57:50.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics; raised status) on 22 June 2011@07:14:12.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 29 August 2012@10:24:09.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@01:03:34.

Headword: *)abelteroko/kkuc
Adler number: alpha,31
Translated headword: silly cuckoo
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The vacuous and silly man.[1]
Greek Original:
*)abelteroko/kkuc: o( keno\s kai\ a)be/lteros.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 32, alpha 33.
[1] Plato Comicus fr. 64 Kock = 65 K.-A. (Phrynichus 48.11). For "cuckoo" alone, in this sense, see e.g. Aristophanes, Acharnians 598 (web address 1 below), and Hesychius s.v. ko/kkuges.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; ethics; imagery; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:28:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, keywords, raised status) on 24 January 2001@22:19:23.
David Whitehead (modified translation and note) on 25 January 2001@03:48:12.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 8 October 2007@00:27:35.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 23 March 2008@01:09:06.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@01:04:18.
David Whitehead (x-refs; more keywords;) on 19 December 2011@06:48:41.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:23:30.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:55.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 1 January 2015@08:53:56.

Headword: *)abolh/twr
Adler number: alpha,59
Translated headword: meeter
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Or[1] a)/bolos ["un-shedder"], a donkey that has not yet shed its teeth, from which the animal's age is known. Similarly, a young animal that does not yet have its indicators.[2] An 'indicator' is what they call a tooth that falls out, by which they verify the age. These teeth are also called 'finished,' by a metaphor from the animals themselves. The a)pognw/mones are those who have grown old and lost their indicators. Also [sc. attested is the phrase] 'unshed foals',[3] those who have not yet lost teeth.
Greek Original:
*)abolh/twr kai\ *)/abolis. h)\ *)/abolos, o)/nos o( mhde/pw beblhkw\s o)do/ntas, e)c ou(= gnwri/zetai h( h(liki/a tou= zw/|ou. e)k de\ tou/tou o( ne/os ou)de/pw gnw/mona e)/xwn. gnw/mona de\ e)/legon to\n ballo/menon o)do/nta, di' ou(= ta\s h(liki/as e)ch/tazon: to\n de\ au)to\n kai\ kathrtuko/ta e)/legon, e)k metafora=s tw=n tetrapo/dwn. kai\ a)pognw/monas tou\s a)pogeghrako/tas, oi(=s e)leloi/pei to\ gnw/risma. kai\ *)abo/lous pw/lous, tou\s mhde/pw beblhko/tas o)do/ntas.
Notes:
[1] The entry has begun with two unglossed headwords, a)bolh/twr ('one who meets': LSJ -- web address 1 below) and a)/bolis (attested only here; not in LSJ).
[2] gnw/mwn; cf. gamma 347, kappa 1061.
[3] Accusative plural, evidently quoted from somewhere.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; medicine; science and technology; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:11:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, augmented notes, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:25:55.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:15:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 18 October 2005@05:37:54.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics, betacode) on 25 March 2008@11:23:51.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@11:38:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 24 August 2010@16:57:08.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:26:52.

Headword: *(abro/s
Adler number: alpha,87
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] bright, delicate, tender.[1]
In the Epigrams: "a cicada sat above a cithara delicately murmuring."[2]
"All the same that fellow is dainty and delicate and weakened by the softness of his body and depraved and with his hair done up like the most licentious little courtesans. And when he goes in to see the king his face and his curly hair are always delicately dripping [with perfume], and he takes as much money from the communal difficulties as would satisfy even the legendary Midas."[3]
Greek Original:
*(abro/s: lampro\s, trufero\s, a(palo/s. e)n *)epigra/mmasin: a(bro\n e)pitru/zwn kiqa/ras u(/per e(/zeto te/ttic. o(/mws de\ o( trufero\s e)kei=nos kai\ a(bro\s kai\ u(po\ malaki/as tou= sw/matos kateagw\s kai\ lelugisme/nos kai\ ta/s te ko/mas a)nadou/menos, w(/sper ai( tw=n e(tairi/dwn a)selge/sterai, kai\ a(brostage\s e)/xwn a)ei\ to\ me/twpon kai\ tou\s bostru/xous, labw\n xrusi/on e)k tw=n koinw=n sumforw=n, o(/son i(kano\n h)=n e)mplh=sai kai\ to\n e)k tou= mu/qou *mi/dan, ei)se/rrei pro\s to\n basile/a.
Notes:
For this adjective see already alpha alpha 73 and alpha 86, and again alpha 88.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha55 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.54.7 (Paulus Silentarius).
[3] Attributed by Hemsterhuys to Eunapius; again (in part) at alpha 1860.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; imagery; mythology; poetry; women; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:39:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@12:21:50.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:35:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 January 2006@10:26:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@04:35:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 December 2011@19:16:16.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:18:56.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:31:02.

Headword: *)agaqh\ kai\ ma/za met' a)/rton
Adler number: alpha,110
Translated headword: after bread a barley cake is good too
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In reference to those who give or take second-best.[1]
*ma/za [barley cake] has an acute [accent]; for a circumflex does not occur before the position of a long vowel.[2] Aristophanes, though, gives ma/za a circumflex: "bring, bring a barley cake for the dung-beetle as quick as you can."[3]
Greek Original:
*)agaqh\ kai\ ma/za met' a)/rton: e)pi\ tw=n ta\ deuterei=a dido/ntwn h)\ ai(roume/nwn. ma/za o)cei=an e)/xei: e)pa/nw ga\r qe/sei makra=s perispwme/nh ou) ti/qetai: o( de\ *)aristofa/nhs perispa= th\n ma/zan: ai)=r' ai)=re ma/zan w(s ta/xista kanqa/rw|.
Notes:
All except the first sentence of this entry is reported by Adler as a marginal gloss in manuscripts A (= Parisinus 2625) and M (= Marcianus 448).
[1] cf. Zenobius 1.12.
[2] Yet in classical Attic, the final syllable is short, so the first syllable can have a circumflex: ma=za. See LSJ (web address 1).
[3] Aristophanes, Peace 1 (web address 2); again at alphaiota 280 and alphaiota 299. In the Aristophanes passage the word is not actually used for cakes of barley but for cakes of dung.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 30 March 2001@14:33:31.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; minor cosmetics) on 31 March 2001@03:05:31.
William Hutton (Augmented note) on 31 March 2001@08:40:31.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:25:33.
David Whitehead (modified end of translation; augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:28:04.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, status) on 4 July 2011@19:14:38.

Headword: *)agaqoklh=s
Adler number: alpha,117
Translated headword: Agathokles, Agathocles
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This man became tyrant [of Syracuse] and, as Timaeus says, in his early youth was a common prostitute, ready [to give himself] to the most debauched, a jackdaw, a buzzard,[1] presenting his backside to all who wanted it. When he died, says [Timaeus], his wife cried out to him in lamentation, "What [did] I not [carnally do to] you? And what [did] you not [reciprocate to] me?"[2] That nature had endowed Agathokles with great advantages is clear. For escaping the wheel, the smoke[of the kiln and] the clay,[3] he came to Syracuse, at about the age of eighteen, and in a short time, starting from such beginnings, he became master of the whole of Sicily, exposed the Carthaginians to extreme dangers, and finally, having grown old in the role of dynast, ended his life with the title of king.[4]
Greek Original:
*)agaqoklh=s: ou(=tos e)ge/neto tu/rannos kai\, w(/s fhsi *ti/maios, kata\ th\n prw/thn h(liki/an koino\s po/rnos, e(/toimos toi=s a)kratesta/tois, koloio\s, trio/rxhs, pa/ntwn tw=n boulome/nwn toi=s o)/pisqen e)/mprosqen gegonw/s. o(\s o(/te a)pe/qane, th\n gunai=ka fhsi\ kataklaiome/nhn au)to\n ou(/tw qrhnei=n: ti/ d' ou)k e)gw\ se/; ti/ d' ou)k e)me\ su/; o(/ti de\ e)k fu/sews a)na/gkh mega/la proterh/mata gegone/nai peri\ to\n *)agaqokle/a, tou=to dh=lon. ei)s ga\r ta\s *surakou/sas paregenh/qh feu/gwn to\n troxo\n, to\n kapno\n, to\n phlo\n, peri/ te th\n h(liki/an o)ktwkai/deka e)/th gegonw\s, kai\ meta/ tina xro/non o(rmhqei\s u(po\ toiau/ths u(poqe/sews, ku/rios me\n e)genh/qh pa/shs *sikeli/as, megi/stois de\ kindu/nois perie/sthse *karxhdoni/ous, te/los e)gghra/sas th=| dunastei/a|, kate/streye to\n bi/on basileu\s prosagoreuo/menos.
Notes:
360-289 BCE; he ruled Syracuse from 317-289. See generally OCD(4) p.36, under Agathocles(1).
The entry presents a semi-verbatim and mildly abridged extract from Polybius (12.15.2-7: web address 1 below), who is in turn citing, disapprovingly, Timaeus of Tauromenium (FGrH 566 F124b).
[1] On this passage K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality (London 1978) p.103 writes: 'The jackdaw here probably sybolises impudence and shamelessness; the buzzard, in Greek triorkhes, having three testicles, presumably symbolises insatiable lust, which is assumed to characterise the true pornos'. Cf. tau 995, where the first part of this quotation reappears.
[2] Probably Theoxene, the daughter or stepdaughter of Ptolemy I Soter and the third wife of Agathokles. See F.W. Walbank, A historical commentary on Polybius (Oxford, 1967) v.2 p.361.
[3] His father owned a large pottery. See Diodorus 19.2.7; 20.63.4. As with equivalent figures in (e.g.) late-C5 Athens, such as Kleon, we see here the conceit that those whose wealth lay in manufacture would actually participate in (and be debased by) the actual manufacturing.
[4] Agathokles assumed the title of king in 305. See Diodorus 20.54.1.
References:
Berve, H., Die Herrschaft des Agathokles (Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1953)
Agathokles(15) in RE 1.1 748-757
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; constitution; daily life; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; history; politics; trade and manufacture; women; zoology
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@10:07:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 6 June 2001@00:10:30.
Tony Natoli (Modified translation, added notes and bibliography, raised status.) on 12 August 2001@02:19:21.
David Whitehead (restorative and other cosmetics) on 17 September 2002@05:10:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@10:59:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 20 November 2005@10:37:08.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:30:36.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:16:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:23:59.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:51:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 17 February 2018@23:14:40.

Headword: *)agaqw=n a)gaqi/des
Adler number: alpha,123
Translated headword: skeins of good things
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The proverb is used in the comic poets in reference to a lot of good things.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] 'sea of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] 'anthills of good things', in reference to an abundance of good fortune.[3]
Also [sc. attested is] 'heap of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things and a lot of good fortune.[4]
Greek Original:
*)agaqw=n a)gaqi/des: ta/ttetai h( paroimi/a para\ toi=s kwmikoi=s e)pi\ tw=n pollw=n a)gaqw=n. kai\ *)agaqw=n qa/lassa, e)pi\ plh/qous a)gaqw=n. kai\ *)agaqw=n murmhki/ai, e)pi\ plh/qous eu)daimoni/as. kai\ *)agaqw=n swro\s, e)pi\ plh/qous a)gaqw=n kai\ pollh=s eu)daimoni/as.
Notes:
The wordplay of the headword phrase a)gaqw=n a)gaqi/des is hard to render in English. 'Bundles of bounties' might do.
[1] (Same material in Photius.) Again at alpha 2601; and see also nu 77 and tau 147.
[2] Again at pi 2049.
[3] Comica adespota fr. 827 Kock, now 796 K.-A.
[4] cf. Apostolius 1.5, etc.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; ethics; imagery; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:28:16.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; minor cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@03:44:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:09:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:28:42.
David Whitehead (corrected a ref) on 16 March 2012@07:56:43.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 December 2014@04:31:45.
David Whitehead (coding) on 12 July 2015@03:58:05.

Headword: *)aga/menos
Adler number: alpha,141
Translated headword: admiring, wondering at, marveling at
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] being amazed at.[1]
"Admiring this man for his high spirits they let him ride on the horse."[2]
Greek Original:
*)aga/menos: qauma/zwn. a)ga/menoi tou=ton th=s eu)yuxi/as e)poxou=si tw=| i(/ppw|.
Notes:
The headword is present participle, masculine nominative singular, of a)/gamai. Same or similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha99 Theodoridis). The headword is evidently quoted from somewhere (other than the quotation given here, which has the corresponding plural); extant possibilities begin with Xenophon and Plato.
[1] cf. alpha 138.
[2] Theophylact Simocatta, Histories 2.6.4.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; philosophy; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@00:49:02.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:43:58.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 25 April 2002@04:22:39.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@05:19:02.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:04:58.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; added a keyword) on 4 April 2015@11:40:30.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 4 April 2015@23:28:28.

Headword: *)aggarei/a
Adler number: alpha,162
Translated headword: compulsory labour, corvee
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Surely "of pack mules".[1]
Also [sc. attested is] a)/ggaros: [meaning] labourer, servant, porter; whence we speak of a)ggarei/a [to describe] involuntary compulsion and service brought about by force.[2]
Greek Original:
*)aggarei/a: li/an a)gga/rwn h(mio/nwn. kai\ *)/aggaros: e)rga/ths, u(phre/ths, a)xqofo/ros: o(/qen a)ggarei/an a)na/gkhn a)kou/sion le/gomen kai\ e)k bi/as ginome/nhn u(phresi/an.
Notes:
For the (unglossed) headword, again under alpha 163, see generally LSJ s.v.; and cf. alpha 164, alpha 165 alpha 166.
[1] The force of li/an is not self-evident here, but see generally LSJ s.v. (The remainder of the phrase might be a quotation, from Libanius, Oration 18.143.)
[2] Same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha94 Theodoridis.
Keywords: daily life; definition; ethics; rhetoric; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:06:05.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:26:56.
William Hutton (Cosmetics) on 28 June 2001@13:52:43.
William Hutton (Added notes) on 28 June 2001@14:04:48.
Anne Mahoney (make the Greek beta-code) on 6 July 2001@11:39:53.
David Whitehead (modified translation; cosmetics) on 11 July 2003@07:40:21.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@07:54:02.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2; tweaking) on 16 August 2013@08:28:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 31 March 2015@01:18:34.
Catharine Roth (betacode cosmeticule) on 5 April 2015@19:19:42.

Headword: *)/aggaroi
Adler number: alpha,165
Translated headword: messengers
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those who carry letters in relays.[1] They are also [called] 'couriers' [a)sta/ndai].[2] The words [are] Persian. Aeschylus in Agamemnon [writes]: "beacon sent beacon hither with relaying fire."[3] The word is also used for conveyors of freight and more generally of inanimate objects and slaves. Also [sc. attested is] the [verb] a)ggaroforei=n in reference to carrying burdens. And [the verb] a)ggareu/esqai means what we now speak of as being impressed to carry burdens and labor of that sort. Menander offers this example in the Sikyonios: "someone arriving by sea puts in? He is labelled an enemy. And if he has anything nice it's pressed into service [a)ggareu/etai]."[4]
Greek Original:
*)/aggaroi: oi( e)k diadoxh=s grammatofo/roi. oi( de\ au)toi\ kai\ a)sta/ndai. ta\ de\ o)no/mata *persika/. *ai)sxu/los *)agame/mnoni: frukto\s de\ frukto\n deu=ro a)p' a)gga/rou puro\s e)/pempe. ti/qetai to\ o)/noma kai\ e)pi\ tw=n forthgw=n kai\ o(/lws tw=n a)naisqh/twn kai\ a)ndrapodwdw=n. kai\ to\ *)aggaroforei=n e)pi\ tou= forti/a fe/rein. kai\ *)aggareu/esqai kalou=sin w(/sper h(mei=s nu=n to\ ei)s forthgi/an kai\ toiau/thn tina\ u(phresi/an a)/gesqai. *me/nandros kai\ tou=to e)n tw=| *sikuwni/w| pari/sthsin: o( ple/wn kath/xqh; kri/neq' ou(=tos pole/mios. e)a\n e)/xh| ti\ malako\n, a)ggareu/etai.
Notes:
Same entry in Photius, similar ones elsewhere.
LSJ entry at web address 1. See also alpha 162, alpha 163, alpha 164.
[1] cf. Herodotus 3.126 (web address 2) and esp. 8.98 (web address 3).
[2] cf. alpha 4420. The word appears also at Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 3.122A (3.94 Kaibel); Eustathius Commentaries on Homer's Odyssey vol. 2 p. 189.6; Hesychius alpha7814; Plutarch, Alexander 18 (bis); De Alex. fort. virt. 326E; 340C.
[3] Aeschylus, Agamemnon 282f. (web address 4), where the mss have a)gge/lou, an obvious gloss.
[4] Menander, Sikyonios fr.4 Sandbach [= fr 440 Kock].
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3,
Web address 4
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; military affairs; science and technology; tragedy; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:13:42.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified translation, added cross-references, keywords, links, set status) on 5 July 2001@12:26:03.
William Hutton (Fixed faulty linksz) on 5 July 2001@12:31:12.
Catharine Roth (added keyword and link; cosmetic) on 5 July 2001@13:14:47.
Anne Mahoney (make the Greek beta-code) on 6 July 2001@11:37:41.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:14:56.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, reordered links, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@01:38:57.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:32:31.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@08:14:35.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 12 August 2013@22:38:38.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 12 August 2013@23:22:50.
David Whitehead (tweaked a ref) on 14 January 2015@03:18:54.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:40:43.

Headword: *)/agauros
Adler number: alpha,176

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