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Headword: Ἄβατον
Adler number: alpha,23
Translated headword: inaccessible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] sacred, unapproachable, desolate;[1] also an 'inaccessible' road, [meaning] impassable.
Greek Original:
Ἄβατον: ἱερὸν, ἀπρόσιτον, ἔρημον: καὶ ὁδὸς ἄβατος, ἡ ἀπόρευτος.
Notes:
The headword is the neuter singular form of this adjective, which, as a substantive, can be used for the adyton of a temple or shrine.
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge alpha5, and Photius, Lexicon alpha31 Theodoridis; cf. Hesychius alpha91 (where Latte confidently asserts that the headword is quoted from Euripides, Bacchae 10).
Keywords: architecture; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:21:29.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keywords and status) on 20 January 2001@11:38:48.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added a keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:31:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keyword, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:18:41.
Catharine Roth (deleted keyword) on 3 October 2007@19:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:05.
William Hutton (Modifed and updated notes.) on 11 November 2007@07:16:09.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@06:14:37.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@03:58:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@00:52:27.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:33:19.
William Hutton (typo) on 21 August 2013@10:06:07.

Headword: Ἀβδέλυκτα
Adler number: alpha,25
Translated headword: unhateful [things]
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those which do not cause pollution, at which one would not feel disgust or hatred. The word [is] somewhat tragic.[1] Aeschylus in Myrmidons [writes]: "indeed, for I love them, they are unhateful to me."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβδέλυκτα: τὰ μὴ μιαίνοντα, ἃ οὐκ ἄν τις βδελυχθείη καὶ δυσχεράνειε. τραγικωτέρα δὲ ἡ λέξις. Αἰσχύλος Μυρμιδόσι: καὶ μὴν, φιλῶ γὰρ, ἀβδέλυκτ' ἐμοὶ τάδε.
Notes:
The headword, presumably extracted from the quotation given, is neuter plural of this adjective.
cf. generally (by way of opposites) beta 197, beta 198, beta 199, beta 200, beta 201, etc.
= Photius, Lexicon alpha33 Theodoridis (Phrynichus, Praeparatio Sophistica fr. 40), and very similar to Synagoge (Codex B) alpha12; cf. Hesychius alpha94.
[1] cf. tau 659.
[2] Aeschylus fr. 137 Nauck.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:23:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:42:07.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmnented notes; cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:40:31.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:28:36.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:38.
William Hutton (Augmented and modified notes) on 11 November 2007@07:20:53.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks) on 19 December 2011@06:28:05.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:35:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:31:12.

Headword: Ἀβίωτον
Adler number: alpha,49
Translated headword: unlivable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] bad [and] annoying, painful.[1]
"He found it an unlivable situation if he could not control the city".[2]
Also [sc. attested is the masculine] ἀβίωτος , he who is not alive.[3]
Greek Original:
Ἀβίωτον: κακὸν ἀηδὲς, ὀδυνηρόν. ὁ δὲ ἀβιώτως εἶχεν, εἰ μὴ κρατήσοι τῆς πόλεως. καὶ Ἀβίωτος, ὁ μὴ ζῶν.
Notes:
[1] Same material in other lexica; references at Photius alpha39 Theodoridis. The headword -- shown by the glossing to be neuter nominative/accusative singular rather than masculine accusative singular -- is evidently quoted from somewhere. The possibilities are numerous. (Latte on Hesychius s.v. confidently asserts Euripides, Alcestis 242.)
[2] Quotation unidentifiable -- but perhaps from Plutarch, who has several instances of the idiom ἀβιώτως ἔχειν .
[3] For this word see also alpha 50.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; history; politics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:01:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation, raised status) on 29 January 2001@17:14:44.
William Hutton (Added note) on 29 January 2001@17:18:16.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics; raised status) on 30 January 2001@03:39:11.
David Whitehead on 30 January 2001@03:40:51.
David Whitehead (restorative cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:57:16.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@07:44:30.
David Whitehead on 19 December 2011@07:45:11.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@05:18:15.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:43:40.

Headword: Ἀβουλία
Adler number: alpha,63
Translated headword: ill-advisedness
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] unrefinedness, foolishness.[1]
Also stupidity.[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβουλία: ἀπαιδευσία, ἄνοια. καὶ μωρία.
Notes:
[1] Same glossing in the Synagoge and Photius (Lexicon alpha47 Theodoridis); they add προπέτεια .
[2] Same glossing in Hesychius alpha171, where Latte claims the headword as quoted from Euripides, Medea 882 (accusative case there).
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:23:23.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and keyword, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:42:17.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 27 February 2003@08:47:42.
David Whitehead (note; another keyword) on 15 August 2007@09:47:02.
David Whitehead (expanded notes) on 19 December 2011@08:50:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 16 August 2013@06:59:03.
David Whitehead on 5 December 2013@04:21:48.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:33:30.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 13 January 2015@23:24:47.

Headword: Ἀβούλως
Adler number: alpha,64
Translated headword: ill-advisedly
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] unthinkingly, ignorantly.[1]
A line [of verse]: "badly, ill-advisedly, unthinkingly, without reason."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβούλως: ἀφρόνως, ἀμαθῶς. στίχος: κακῶς, ἀβούλως, ἀφρόνως, ἄνευ λόγου.
Notes:
[1] Same glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha48 Theodoridis); and cf. generally alpha 60, alpha 63.
[2] An unidentifiable iambic trimeter, perhaps from tragedy.
Keywords: definition; ethics; meter and music; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:24:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, translation, augmented note and keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:45:54.
David Whitehead (added note) on 23 April 2002@09:19:48.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 15 August 2007@09:49:22.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@08:56:38.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:01:26.

Headword: Ἁβρὰ βαίνων
Adler number: alpha,70
Translated headword: walking delicately
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] being conceited, being indolent.[1]
"Walking truly delicately, that fellow seemed to be holding his eyebrows up in the air."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἁβρὰ βαίνων: θρυπτόμενος, βλακευόμενος. ἐκεῖνος ὄντως ἁβρὰ βαίνων ἐδόκει ἔχων τὰς ὀφρῦς ὑπερηρμένας ἄνω.
Notes:
See generally LSJ s.v. ἁβρός (web address 1).
[1] The headword phrase has the same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha49 Theodoridis. It could be extracted from the quotation given, but is more likely to be quoted from Euripides, Trojan Women 820. (So Latte on Hesychius s.v. and more tentatively Theodoridis on Photius s.v.)
[2] Quotation (transmitted, in Adler's view, via the Excerpta Constantini Porphyrogeniti) unidentifiable.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:27:05.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set status) on 30 January 2001@23:11:22.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added note; cosmetics) on 31 January 2001@04:28:51.
Jennifer Benedict (added links) on 25 March 2008@11:53:43.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@03:49:27.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@09:07:56.
David Whitehead (modified notes) on 1 February 2012@05:31:39.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 12 August 2013@22:35:19.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:07:06.
Catharine Roth (typo, coding) on 14 February 2015@10:46:33.
David Whitehead (expanded a note) on 2 April 2015@10:36:52.

Headword: Ἁβροσύνη
Adler number: alpha,89
Translated headword: splendor
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] brightness.
Greek Original:
Ἁβροσύνη: φαιδρότης.
Notes:
The rare headword noun (also in other lexica, with the same gloss) is a poetic variant of ἁβρότης ; see LSJ s.v. Though it is attested in Sappho and elsewhere, its inclusion here seems to have been prompted by its occurrence in Euripides, Orestes 349 (so Latte on Hesychius s.v.); cf. the scholia there.
cf. generally alpha 86, alpha 87, alpha 88. For the glossing noun see also the gloss at pi 138.
Keywords: daily life; definition; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:40:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, cosmetics, set keywords & status) on 1 February 2001@21:30:02.
David Whitehead (x-refs) on 3 January 2005@10:39:54.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords) on 21 December 2011@04:44:38.
David Whitehead (tweaked note) on 1 February 2012@05:40:54.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 4 April 2015@08:08:49.

Headword: Ἀβρότη
Adler number: alpha,92
Translated headword: divine, holy
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. a term applied to] night.
Because it is deprived [a-] of people [brotoi].[1]
Greek Original:
Ἀβρότη: ἡ νύξ. παρὰ τὸ ἐστερῆσθαι βροτῶν.
Notes:
The headword occurs as an adjective describing night in Homer, Iliad 14.78 (web address 1). It recurs at Sophocles fr.269c 20 (of the darkness of death); and it is also a textual variant at (?)Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound 2 (applied to 'wilderness').
With the exception of this last instance (and contrary to the present entry), the word is best understood as a doublet for ἄμβροτος , 'immortal' (alpha 1540). See LSJ s.v. at web address 2.
[1] Addendum lacking, Adler reports, in mss AS.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:42:56.
Vetted by:
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@10:41:02.
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@10:52:34.
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@11:14:00.
Elizabeth Vandiver on 16 November 1999@14:44:14.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 1 February 2001@22:28:35.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 5 February 2003@09:56:18.
David Whitehead (tweaked hw; augmented notes; another keyword) on 21 December 2011@06:19:18.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 22 December 2011@19:26:00.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 4 October 2015@10:37:09.

Headword: Ἁβροχίτων
Adler number: alpha,96
Translated headword: delicate-tunic'd
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] wearing delicate things.
Greek Original:
Ἁβροχίτων: τρυφερὰ φορῶν.
Note:
Same entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha60 Theodoridis. The headword adjective bears this meaning in e.g. Greek Anthology 9.538; however, the word is first attested in Aeschylus, Persians 543, of beds (accusative plural: web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: clothing; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:45:35.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, set keywords and status) on 1 February 2001@22:44:01.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 27 February 2003@09:00:26.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, title tags) on 25 March 2008@12:02:09.
David Whitehead (expanded note; tweaks) on 21 December 2011@06:35:49.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:27:25.

Headword: Ἁβρύνεται
Adler number: alpha,99
Translated headword: puts on airs
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] adorns oneself, is conceited, is boastful.
Greek Original:
Ἁβρύνεται: κοσμεῖται, θρύπτεται, καυχᾶται.
Note:
Same or similar entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha61 Theodoridis. This is comment, presumably, on one of the famous appearances of the headword in Attic tragedy: Aeschylus, Agamemnon 1205 (web address 1); Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus 1339 (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:48:03.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keyword and status) on 1 February 2001@23:04:11.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 27 February 2003@09:04:25.
Jennifer Benedict (added links and title tags) on 25 March 2008@12:05:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 26 March 2008@04:00:14.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 21 December 2011@06:47:48.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:29:27.
Catharine Roth (tweaked links) on 15 February 2017@01:28:24.

Headword: Ἀγάθαρχος
Adler number: alpha,109
Translated headword: Agatharkhos, Agatharchos, Agatharchus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name. He was an outstanding painter from nature, the son of Eudemos, of Samian stock.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάθαρχος: ὄνομα κύριον. ἦν δὲ ζωγράφος ἐπιφανὴς, Εὐδήμου υἱὸς, τὸ δὲ γένος Σάμιος.
Notes:
After the initial gloss, this entry derives from Harpokration s.v., commenting on Demosthenes 21.147 (web address 1).
The other primary sources on A. (translated in Pollitt, below) are Plutarch, Life of Pericles 13.2 (web address 2); Plutarch, Life of Alcibiades 16.4 (web address 3); Vitruvius, On Architecture 7, praef. 1l (web address 4).
According to tradition, A. was the first painter to make a theatrical skene (for Aeschylus).
References:
OCD(4) s.v. (p.35)
J.J. Pollitt, The Art of Ancient Greece (Cambridge 1990) 145-6 (with 188)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3,
Web address 4
Keywords: art history; biography; definition; geography; rhetoric; science and technology; stagecraft; tragedy
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 1 October 1999@23:24:55.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headwords and note; augmented bibliography) on 9 February 2001@09:13:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2003@08:05:39.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added keyword) on 28 September 2005@20:10:00.
Jennifer Benedict (added links) on 26 March 2008@00:23:53.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 19 July 2011@09:47:47.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links, other cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@18:47:22.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:18:59.

Headword: Ἀγάθων
Adler number: alpha,124
Translated headword: Agathon
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name. He was a tragic poet; but he was slandered for effeminacy. Aristophanes [writes]:[1] "Where is Agathon?" -- "He's gone and left me." -- "Where on earth is the wretch?" -- "At a banquet of the blessed." This Agathon was good by nature, "missed by his friends" and brilliant at the dinner table. They say also that the Symposium of Plato was set at a dinner party of his, with many philosophers introduced all together. A comic poet [sic] of the school of Socrates. He was lampooned in comedy for womanliness.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάθων: ὄνομα κύριον. τραγικὸς δὲ ἦν: διεβέβλητο δὲ ἐπὶ μαλακίᾳ. Ἀριστοφάνης: Ἀγάθων δὲ ποῦ 'στιν; ἀπολιπών μ' οἴχεται. ποῖ γῆς ὁ τλήμων; ἐς μακάρων εὐωχίαν. οὗτος ὁ Ἀγάθων ἀγαθὸς ἦν τὸν τρόπον, ποθεινὸς τοῖς φίλοις καὶ τὴν τράπεζαν λαμπρός. φασὶ δὲ ὅτι καὶ Πλάτωνος Συμπόσιον ἐν ἑστιάσει αὐτοῦ γέγραπται, πολλῶν ἅμα φιλοσόφων παραχθέντων. κωμῳδιοποιὸς Σωκράτους διδασκαλείου. ἐκωμῳδεῖτο δὲ εἰς θηλύτητα.
Notes:
C5 BCE; OCD(4) s.v. (pp.37-7); TrGF 39. See also under alpha 125.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 83-85 (web address 1), with scholion; dialogue between Herakles and Dionysos. The phrase "missed by his friends", which the lexicographer uses below, is from the same source.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; ethics; food; gender and sexuality; philosophy; poetry; tragedy; women
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:48:08.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note, bibliography, keyword; cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@04:32:53.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:15:58.
Jennifer Benedict (added reference to link) on 26 March 2008@00:44:35.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:40:05.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:26:35.

Headword: Ἀγαθώνιος
Adler number: alpha,125
Translated headword: Agathonios, Agathonius
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name.[1]
[The man] who was king of Tartessos.[2]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Agathon's pipe-playing": the soft and relaxed [kind]; alternatively that which is neither loose nor harsh, but temperate and very sweet.[3]
Greek Original:
Ἀγαθώνιος: ὄνομα κύριον. ὃς ἐβασίλευσε τῆς Ταρτησσοῦ. καὶ Ἀγαθώνιος αὔλησις: ἡ μαλακὴ καὶ ἐκλελυμένη: ἢ ἡ μήτε χαλαρὰ, μήτε πικρὰ, ἀλλ' εὔκρατος καὶ ἡδίστη.
Notes:
[1] Herodotus 1.163 gives it as Arganthonios (text at web address 1). See also tau 137.
[2] In southern Spain; probably the Biblical Tarshish. See generally tau 137 and OCD(4) s.v. (p.1433).
[3] Zenobius 1.2. On Agathon (an Athenian poet of the late C5 BC) and his reputation for softness see alpha 124; and on his aulos music, M.L. West, Ancient Greek Music (Oxford 1992) 354-5.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; ethics; geography; historiography; history; imagery; meter and music; proverbs; tragedy
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:33:27.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 25 April 2002@11:17:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:14:00.
Catharine Roth (cross-reference, italics, keyword) on 18 September 2006@18:09:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:42:50.
David Whitehead on 22 December 2011@07:43:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:34:58.

Headword: Ἀγακλειτός
Adler number: alpha,127
Translated headword: celebrated, very famous
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
He who has an exceedingly fine reputation.[1] And [sc. attested is the feminine] αγακλειτη .[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀγακλειτός: ὁ ἄγαν ἔνδοξος. καὶ Ἀγακλειτή.
Notes:
Epic & tragic adjective: LSJ entry at web address 1.
[1] Same glossing, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (130); see also Hesychius s.v. ἀγάκλειτοι , and the scholia to Homer, Iliad 3.59.
[2] Homer, Iliad 18.45 (of the Nereid Galateia).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@01:00:32.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 2 April 2001@10:25:50.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@04:01:01.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@00:49:03.
David Whitehead (another note; another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:33:11.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword) on 22 December 2011@08:26:00.

Headword: Ἀγάλλει
Adler number: alpha,130
Translated headword: glorifies, honours
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning he/she/it] makes, prepares, adorns.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάλλει: ποιεῖ, σκευάζει, κοσμεῖ.
Notes:
= Eudemus 2a.22 and Synagoge (Codex B) alpha66; a longer one in Photius, Lexicon alpha86 Theodoridis, with two further glosses (τιμᾳ̂ , προσεύχεται ).
The headword itself is third person singular, present indicative active, of ἀγάλλω (cf. under alpha 131), evidently quoted from somewhere. The possibilities include Pindar, Nemeans 5.43, and Euripides, Hercules 379.
The verb is used especially of what one does to a deity: see LSJ (web address 1).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:03:42.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@09:55:11.
Catharine Roth (added link) on 2 April 2001@10:15:38.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:21:54.
David Whitehead (expanded note; more keywords) on 22 December 2011@08:53:00.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:50:21.
William Hutton (updated references in notes) on 19 June 2016@09:56:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 19 June 2016@23:20:54.

Headword: Ἀγάλματα
Adler number: alpha,133
Translated headword: delights, ornaments, statues
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the likenesses of the gods, and anything that is decorative in some way. Homer [writes]: "but it is stored away as a delight for the king."[1] And Hesiod calls a necklace an "ornament";[2] but Pindar uses this term for the decoration on a tomb,[3] and Euripides uses it for the adornments for corpses.[4]
Also something in which someone takes delight.[5]
Also [sc. a term for] image, wooden statue, delight, beauty, ornament, source of pride, palm leaves,[6] [human] statues, [honorific?] inscriptions.
Paintings and [human] statues are also called agalmata.[7]
agalmation [is] the diminutive form.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάλματα: τὰ τῶν θεῶν μιμήματα, καὶ πάντα τὰ κόσμου τινὸς μετέχοντα. Ὅμηρος: βασιλῆϊ δὲ κεῖται ἄγαλμα. καὶ Ἡσίοδος τὸν ὅρμον ἄγαλμα καλεῖ: Πίνδαρος δὲ τὴν ἐπὶ τάφου στήλην οὕτω καλεῖ, Εὐριπίδης τὸν ἐπὶ νεκροῖς κόσμον. καὶ ἐφ' ᾧ τις ἀγάλλεται. καὶ τὸ εἴδωλον, βρέτας, χάρμα, καλλονὴ, κόσμος, καύχημα, θαλλοὶ, ἀνδριάντες, ἐπιγραφαί. Ἀγάλματα δὲ καὶ τὰς γραφὰς καὶ τοὺς ἀνδριάντας λέγουσιν. Ἀγαλμάτιον δὲ ὑποκοριστικῶς.
Notes:
The (neuter) headword is the plural of alpha 131 (and cf. alpha 132). It is perhaps, though not necessarily, quoted from somewhere.
[1] Homer, Iliad 4.144 (web address 1), on an ivory cheek-piece for a horse.
[2] This fragment of Hesiod (142 Merkelbach-West, 233 Rzach) is not known from any other source. It may pertain to the story of Europa in the Catalogue of Women.
[3] Pindar, Nemean Odes 10.125 (67 Bowra): web address 2.
[4] Euripides, Alcestis 613: web address 3.
[5] Already at alpha 131.
[6] Used as prizes for victors in competition.
[7] Same material in Photius (Lexicon alpha92 Theodoridis) and elsewhere; cf. Kassel-Austin, PCG II p.365 (on Antiphanes fr.102).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: art history; athletics; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; poetry; religion; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 12 January 1999@12:39:04.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (cosmetics) on 29 June 2000@22:39:50.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 17 February 2003@05:54:38.
Jennifer Benedict (cleaned up links) on 26 March 2008@01:00:28.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:07:43.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7) on 16 August 2013@07:56:54.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7; another keyword) on 22 December 2014@04:58:33.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 6 November 2016@12:23:04.

Headword: Ἄγανον
Adler number: alpha,145
Translated headword: firewood, broken; good, gentle
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
With proparoxytone accent[1] [this means] wood that has been cut up.
Or brushwood and [wood that is] ready to be cut up.[2]
But some [sc. define it as wood] which is not chopped.
But with the oxytone[3] it means fine. Or good or kindly, though some [say] immortal. Whence also [comes the term] ἀγανοφροσύνη ["kindly-mindedness"].
Also [sc. attested is the verb] ἀγανοῦμεν ["we will make nice"],[4] meaning we will beautify.
And elsewhere: "however gentle you might pass into the Athenian book of death, you would always have your tresses well-garlanded."[5]
Greek Original:
Ἄγανον: προπαροξυτόνως τὸ κατεαγὸς ξύλον. ἢ τὸ φρυγανῶδες καὶ ἕτοιμον πρὸς τὸ κατεαγῆναι. οἱ δὲ τὸ ἀπελέκητον. Ἀγανὸν δὲ ὀξυτόνως καλόν. ἢ ἀγαθὸν ἢ ἱλαρὸν, οἱ δὲ ἀθάνατον. ἔνθεν καὶ ἀγανοφροσύνη. καὶ Ἀγανοῦμεν, ἀντὶ τοῦ κοσμήσομεν. καὶ αὖθις: ὡς ἄν τοι ῥείῃ μὲν ἀγανὸς Ἀτθίδι δέλτῳ κηρὸς, ὑπὸ στεφάνοις δ' αἰὲν ἔχοις πλοκάμους.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 146, alpha 147, alpha 148, alpha 149.
[1] i.e. ἄγανος (here neuter).
[2] Addendum lacking in mss ASM.
[3] i.e. ἀγανός (again, here neuter).
[4] Attested only here, but cf. the scholia to Aristophanes, Peace 398 (where ἀγαλοῦμεν occurs).
[5] Greek Anthology 7.36.5 (Erucius), on the tomb of Sophocles; cf. Gow and Page (252-253), alpha 1421, beta 453, and sigma 569.
Reference:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: botany; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@23:57:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@11:07:52.
Jennifer Benedict (tags) on 26 March 2008@01:08:32.
David Whitehead (augmented n.4; more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:01:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@05:41:50.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.5, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keyword) on 25 October 2018@15:42:25.

Headword: Ἄγγαροι
Adler number: alpha,165
Translated headword: messengers
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those who carry letters in relays.[1] They are also [called] 'couriers' [ἀστάνδαι ].[2] The words [are] Persian. Aeschylus in Agamemnon [writes]: "beacon sent beacon hither with relaying fire."[3] The word is also used for conveyors of freight and more generally of inanimate objects and slaves. Also [sc. attested is] the [verb] ἀγγαροφορεῖν in reference to carrying burdens. And [the verb] ἀγγαρεύεσθαι means what we now speak of as being impressed to carry burdens and labor of that sort. Menander offers this example in the Sikyonios: "someone arriving by sea puts in? He is labelled an enemy. And if he has anything nice it's pressed into service [ἀγγαρεύεται ]."[4]
Greek Original:
Ἄγγαροι: οἱ ἐκ διαδοχῆς γραμματοφόροι. οἱ δὲ αὐτοὶ καὶ ἀστάνδαι. τὰ δὲ ὀνόματα Περσικά. Αἰσχύλος Ἀγαμέμνονι: φρυκτὸς δὲ φρυκτὸν δεῦρο ἀπ' ἀγγάρου πυρὸς ἔπεμπε. τίθεται τὸ ὄνομα καὶ ἐπὶ τῶν φορτηγῶν καὶ ὅλως τῶν ἀναισθήτων καὶ ἀνδραποδωδῶν. καὶ τὸ Ἀγγαροφορεῖν ἐπὶ τοῦ φορτία φέρειν. καὶ Ἀγγαρεύεσθαι καλοῦσιν ὥσπερ ἡμεῖς νῦν τὸ εἰς φορτηγίαν καὶ τοιαύτην τινὰ ὑπηρεσίαν ἄγεσθαι. Μένανδρος καὶ τοῦτο ἐν τῷ Σικυωνίῳ παρίστησιν: ὁ πλέων κατήχθη; κρίνεθ' οὗτος πολέμιος. ἐὰν ἔχῃ τὶ μαλακὸν, ἀγγαρεύεται.
Notes:
Same entry in Photius, similar ones elsewhere.
LSJ entry at web address 1. See also alpha 162, alpha 163, alpha 164.
[1] cf. Herodotus 3.126 (web address 2) and esp. 8.98 (web address 3).
[2] cf. alpha 4420. The word appears also at Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 3.122A (3.94 Kaibel); Eustathius Commentaries on Homer's Odyssey vol. 2 p. 189.6; Hesychius alpha7814; Plutarch, Alexander 18 (bis); De Alex. fort. virt. 326E; 340C.
[3] Aeschylus, Agamemnon 282f. (web address 4), where the mss have ἀγγέλου , an obvious gloss.
[4] Menander, Sikyonios fr.4 Sandbach [= fr 440 Kock].
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3,
Web address 4
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; military affairs; science and technology; tragedy; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:13:42.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified translation, added cross-references, keywords, links, set status) on 5 July 2001@12:26:03.
William Hutton (Fixed faulty linksz) on 5 July 2001@12:31:12.
Catharine Roth (added keyword and link; cosmetic) on 5 July 2001@13:14:47.
Anne Mahoney (make the Greek beta-code) on 6 July 2001@11:37:41.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:14:56.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, reordered links, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@01:38:57.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:32:31.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@08:14:35.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 12 August 2013@22:38:38.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 12 August 2013@23:22:50.
David Whitehead (tweaked a ref) on 14 January 2015@03:18:54.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:40:43.

Headword: Ἀγάσματα
Adler number: alpha,170
Translated headword: objects of wonder
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] objects of awe, things at which one would wonder [ἀγάσαιτο ]. Sophocles uses [the word].
Greek Original:
Ἀγάσματα: σεβάσματα, ἃ ἄν τις ἀγάσαιτο. Σοφοκλῆς κέχρηται.
Note:
The headword, a neuter plural, is printed as Sophocles fr. 971 Radt (885 Nauck edn.2), on the authority of this entry and Photius p.13, 28 Reitzenstein [now alpha131 Theodoridis] = Synagoge alpha95. Similar definitions in Hesychius alpha340 and at Eustathius Commentaries on Homer's Iliad 3.589.17. It is otherwise unattested.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@14:19:45.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered headword, added keywords, set status) on 31 October 2001@10:02:19.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 14 April 2004@05:25:52.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 23 December 2011@08:44:45.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@05:54:36.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 December 2014@00:00:14.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 29 December 2014@01:06:02.
Catharine Roth (expanded abbreviation) on 5 April 2015@21:51:21.
Catharine Roth (tweaked Eustathius reference) on 5 April 2015@21:57:17.

Headword: Ἀγάστονος
Adler number: alpha,171
Translated headword: much-groaning
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] copiously moaning.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάστονος: πολυστένακτος.
Notes:
Same or similar entries in other lexica; references at Photius alpha128 Theodoridis.
The headword adjective is used of Poseidon's wife Amphitrite (personifying the sea) in Homer, Odyssey 12.97 (web address 1), and in the Homeric Hymn (3) to Apollo 94 (web address 2); it is also attested in a general sense at Aeschylus, Seven against Thebes 99 (web address 3).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: definition; epic; imagery; mythology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@14:50:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and keyword, added links) on 31 October 2001@10:12:18.
David Whitehead (expanded note; added a keyword; cosmetics) on 14 April 2004@05:35:23.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 26 March 2008@01:52:49.
David Whitehead (augmented note; another keyword) on 23 December 2011@08:49:34.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@05:55:48.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note and links) on 3 October 2013@00:53:22.

Headword: Ἀγαστός
Adler number: alpha,173
Translated headword: admirable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] wondrous.
Greek Original:
Ἀγαστός: θαυμαστός.
Notes:
Likewise or similarly in other lexica; references at Photius alpha129 Theodoridis. (Latte on Hesychius s.v. claims the headword as quoted from Euripides, Hecuba 169, but there are alternatives in Plato and elsewhere.)
See further under alpha 174.
Keywords: definition; ethics; philosophy; tragedy
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@14:48:46.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (changed headword, to differentiate it from gloss) on 11 February 2001@09:36:58.
David Whitehead (added note) on 26 June 2001@06:42:44.
David Whitehead (expanded note; another keyword; cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@09:02:42.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 1 February 2012@05:58:50.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:00:42.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@21:59:48.

Headword: Ἀγηλατεῖν
Adler number: alpha,214
Translated headword: to drive out, to drive out a curse
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to pursue, to drive into exile,[1] to set upon.
Herodotus [sc. uses it in the sense of] to do violence.[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀγηλατεῖν: διώκειν, φυγαδεύειν, ἐπιτάττειν. Ἡρόδοτος, ὑβρίζειν.
Notes:
[1] The first two of these glossing infinitives are paralleled in Photius, Lexicon alpha162 Theodoridis, where the participle ἀγηλατῶν (said to be extracted from the tragic poet Nicomachus) is glossed with διώκων and φυγαδεύων .
[2] A very loose interpretation of the single use of this verb by Herodotus (5.72.1: see web address 1 below for Greek text), from the ancient glosses on that passage; "drive out" would be better there, as elsewhere. See further under the next entry, alpha 215.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; religion; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@22:04:55.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keywords; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@11:41:09.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks) on 3 January 2012@08:22:00.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:56:29.

Headword: Ἀγηλατεῖν
Adler number: alpha,215
Translated headword: to banish as accursed
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to drive out as a curse and accursed people.[1]
If [the breathing is] rough, [it means] to drive out curses; but if smooth, it means to drive away. "You seem to me to be in sad shape, you and the one who arranged to drive out these things".[2]
And Herodotus [writes]: "he arrived with a large force and drove out seven hundred Athenian families as accursed."[3]
Greek Original:
Ἀγηλατεῖν: ὡς ἄγος καὶ ἐναγεῖς τινας ἐλαύνειν. ἐὰν μὲν δασέως, τὸ τὰ ἄγη ἀπελαύνειν: ἐὰν δὲ ψιλῶς, ἀντὶ τοῦ ἀπελάσειν. κλαίων δοκεῖς μοι καὶ σὺ χ'ὡ συνθεὶς τάδε ἀγηλατήσειν. καὶ Ἡρόδοτος: ὁ δὲ σὺν μεγάλῃ χειρὶ ἀπικόμενος ἀγηλατέει ἑπτακόσια ἐπίστια Ἀθηναίων.
Notes:
On this verb see already alpha 214.
[1] Same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha161 Theodoridis.
[2] Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus 401-2, with scholion.
[3] Herodotus 5.72.1 (web address 1 below) on king Cleomenes of Sparta in 510 BCE.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; geography; historiography; history; religion; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@22:19:26.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 October 2000@07:09:53.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 27 March 2006@04:52:11.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 3 January 2012@08:29:18.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:57:54.

Headword: Ἀγηλατοί
Adler number: alpha,216
Translated headword: curse-expelling
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[A term applicable to] thunderbolts.[1]
But ἀγηλατοῖ [is] a verb,[2] [meaning he/she/it] leads, thunderbolts[3] or pursues.
Greek Original:
Ἀγηλατοί: οἱ κεραυνοί. Ἀγηλατοῖ δὲ ῥῆμα, ἄγει, κεραυνοὶ ἢ διώκει.
Notes:
[1] The headword is masculine/feminine nominative plural of this adjective, presumably quoted from somewhere. For the sense, LSJ s.v. cite the phrase ἀγηλάτῳ μάστιγι (i.e. a purifying lightning-strike) in Lycophron, Alexandra 436.
[2] And differently accented, as if from a contracted verb ἀγηλατοῦν ; but LSJ has only ἀγηλατεῖν .
[3] Textual corruption here: a (plural) noun amidst (singular) verbs. Perhaps it has been carelessly repeated from the first part of the entry.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; religion; science and technology; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@22:22:14.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; added notes and keyword) on 26 April 2002@05:38:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; cosmetics) on 3 January 2012@08:41:31.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@07:01:02.

Headword: Ἀγῆλαι
Adler number: alpha,217
Translated headword: to celebrate, to glorify
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to honor a god with celebrations. Thus Eupolis in Demes [writes]: "now we too should dedicate to these the twin woolly wreaths[1] and approach in celebration. Hail everyone, we welcome [you]!"[2] Aristophanes in Peace [writes]: "and with holy sacrifices and grand processions we all, on our own, glorify you, mistress, always".[3] Hermippus in Breadsellers [writes]: "come now, glorify the same gods I do and burn the incense, now that your son has been saved".[4]
Greek Original:
Ἀγῆλαι: τιμῆσαι θεὸν ἀγλαί̈αις. οὕτως Εὔπολις Δήμοις: ἀναθῶμεν νῦν χἡμεῖς τούτοις τὰς διττὰς εἰρεσιώνας καὶ προσαγήλωμεν ἐπελθόντες. χαίρετε πάντες, δεχόμεσθα. Ἀριστοφάνης Εἰρήνῃ: καί σε θυσίαισιν ἱεραῖσι προσόδοις τε μεγάλαις ἰδίᾳ πάντες, ὦ πότνι', ἀγαλοῦμεν ἡμεῖς ἀεί. Ἕρμιππος Ἀρτοπώλισι: φέρε νῦν ἀγήλω τοὺς θεοὺς οἵους ἐγὼ καὶ θυμιάσω τοῦ τέκνου σεσωσμένου.
Notes:
Same or similar material in other lexica; references at Photius alpha163 Theodoridis (and see also alpha164). The headword is the aorist infinitive of the verb ἀγάλλω , probably quoted from Euripides, Medea 1027; cf. the scholia there.
See also alpha 218.
[1] On the role of woolly wreathes in ancient ritual see LSJ (web address 1) and epsiloniota 184, pi 1304, delta 589. A Homeric "epigram" is also called εἰρεσιώνη and designed to accompany the procession (omicron 251 [note 35]).
[2] Eupolis fr. 119 Kock, now 131 K.-A. (using, in fact, a compound of the headword verb).
[3] An approximation of Aristophanes, Peace 396-398.
[4] Hermippus fr. 8 Kock (and K.-A.).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; religion; tragedy; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@22:35:49.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; cosmetics) on 18 January 2001@05:57:23.
Robert Dyer (Added new note 1 and Web address. Minor spelling chnge.) on 23 January 2002@15:54:18.
Tony Natoli (Corrected link to LSJ) on 4 November 2006@20:28:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 5 November 2006@04:19:34.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 3 January 2012@08:47:48.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@07:06:18.
David Whitehead (updated 2 refs) on 23 December 2014@08:30:14.

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