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Headword: *)abasa/nistos
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
*)abasa/nistos: a)gu/mnastos h)\ a)nece/tastos, a)doki/mastos. ei)/rhtai de\ a)po\ th=s basa/nou th=s xrusoxoi+kh=s li/qou, e)n h(=| dokima/zousi to\ xrusi/on. e)xrh/sato de\ *ai)liano\s e)n tw=| peri\ pronoi/as tw=| a)basa/nistos a)nti\ tou= a)/neu o)du/nhs.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] ba/sanos can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.

Headword: *(abrai=s
Adler number: alpha,73
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] gentle, dainty.[1] Aelian [writes]: "them placing [half-beams] upon very delicate couches and mattresses adorned with some magnificent weaving."[2]
Greek Original:
*(abrai=s: a(palai=s, truferai=s. *ai)liano/s: e)pi\ kli/nais ma/la a(brai=s kai\ strwmnai=s u(/fei tini\ u(perhfa/nw| kekosmhme/nais e)piqe/ntas.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 70.
[1] The headword is dative plural of this adjective, presumably extracted from the quotation given.
[2] A truncated version of Aelian fr. 53h Domingo-Forasté (50 Hercher); more fully at delta 75, and see also upsilon 290.
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:29:17.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added keyword, set status) on 31 January 2001@13:01:14.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 1 February 2001@03:53:15.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:25:52.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 28 January 2012@18:56:48.
David Whitehead (another x-ref; cosmetics) on 17 January 2014@04:28:35.

Headword: *)agaqoklh=s
Adler number: alpha,117
Translated headword: Agathokles, Agathocles
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This man became tyrant [of Syracuse] and, as Timaeus says, in his early youth was a common prostitute, ready [to give himself] to the most debauched, a jackdaw, a buzzard,[1] presenting his backside to all who wanted it. When he died, says [Timaeus], his wife cried out to him in lamentation, "What [did] I not [carnally do to] you? And what [did] you not [reciprocate to] me?"[2] That nature had endowed Agathokles with great advantages is clear. For escaping the wheel, the smoke[of the kiln and] the clay,[3] he came to Syracuse, at about the age of eighteen, and in a short time, starting from such beginnings, he became master of the whole of Sicily, exposed the Carthaginians to extreme dangers, and finally, having grown old in the role of dynast, ended his life with the title of king.[4]
Greek Original:
*)agaqoklh=s: ou(=tos e)ge/neto tu/rannos kai\, w(/s fhsi *ti/maios, kata\ th\n prw/thn h(liki/an koino\s po/rnos, e(/toimos toi=s a)kratesta/tois, koloio\s, trio/rxhs, pa/ntwn tw=n boulome/nwn toi=s o)/pisqen e)/mprosqen gegonw/s. o(\s o(/te a)pe/qane, th\n gunai=ka fhsi\ kataklaiome/nhn au)to\n ou(/tw qrhnei=n: ti/ d' ou)k e)gw\ se/; ti/ d' ou)k e)me\ su/; o(/ti de\ e)k fu/sews a)na/gkh mega/la proterh/mata gegone/nai peri\ to\n *)agaqokle/a, tou=to dh=lon. ei)s ga\r ta\s *surakou/sas paregenh/qh feu/gwn to\n troxo\n, to\n kapno\n, to\n phlo\n, peri/ te th\n h(liki/an o)ktwkai/deka e)/th gegonw\s, kai\ meta/ tina xro/non o(rmhqei\s u(po\ toiau/ths u(poqe/sews, ku/rios me\n e)genh/qh pa/shs *sikeli/as, megi/stois de\ kindu/nois perie/sthse *karxhdoni/ous, te/los e)gghra/sas th=| dunastei/a|, kate/streye to\n bi/on basileu\s prosagoreuo/menos.
Notes:
360-289 BCE; he ruled Syracuse from 317-289. See generally OCD(4) p.36, under Agathocles(1).
The entry presents a semi-verbatim and mildly abridged extract from Polybius (12.15.2-7: web address 1 below), who is in turn citing, disapprovingly, Timaeus of Tauromenium (FGrH 566 F124b).
[1] On this passage K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality (London 1978) p.103 writes: 'The jackdaw here probably sybolises impudence and shamelessness; the buzzard, in Greek triorkhes, having three testicles, presumably symbolises insatiable lust, which is assumed to characterise the true pornos'. Cf. tau 995, where the first part of this quotation reappears.
[2] Probably Theoxene, the daughter or stepdaughter of Ptolemy I Soter and the third wife of Agathokles. See F.W. Walbank, A historical commentary on Polybius (Oxford, 1967) v.2 p.361.
[3] His father owned a large pottery. See Diodorus 19.2.7; 20.63.4. As with equivalent figures in (e.g.) late-C5 Athens, such as Kleon, we see here the conceit that those whose wealth lay in manufacture would actually participate in (and be debased by) the actual manufacturing.
[4] Agathokles assumed the title of king in 305. See Diodorus 20.54.1.
References:
Berve, H., Die Herrschaft des Agathokles (Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1953)
Agathokles(15) in RE 1.1 748-757
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; constitution; daily life; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; history; politics; trade and manufacture; women; zoology
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@10:07:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 6 June 2001@00:10:30.
Tony Natoli (Modified translation, added notes and bibliography, raised status.) on 12 August 2001@02:19:21.
David Whitehead (restorative and other cosmetics) on 17 September 2002@05:10:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@10:59:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 20 November 2005@10:37:08.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:30:36.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:16:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:23:59.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:51:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 17 February 2018@23:14:40.

Headword: *)/agalma
Adler number: alpha,131
Translated headword: decoration, delight, ornament, statue
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Anything in which someone takes delight.[1]
"And he [A] gives silver, so that he [B] might complete the statue with the utmost artisanry, adding the size and prescribing the nature of the stone."[2]
Greek Original:
*)/agalma: pa=n e)f' w(=| tis a)ga/lletai. kai\ di/dwsin a)rgu/rion, i(/na e)kponh/sh| to\ a)/galma a)/kras te/xnhs, prosqei\s to\ me/geqos kai\ proseipw\n th=s li/qou th\n fu/sin.
Notes:
See also alpha 132, alpha 133, alpha 135, alpha 136.
[1] Again under alpha 133. Also in Photius, other lexica, and various scholia (e.g. to Homer, Odyssey 8.509, and Aristophanes, Wasps 303).
[2] Aelian fr. 65b Domingo-Forasté (part of 62 Hercher), on an unscrupulous (but unnamed) sculptor.
Keywords: art history; comedy; definition; economics; epic; ethics; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 June 2000@01:06:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@09:59:18.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 18 February 2011@06:57:00.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@03:46:34.
Catharine Roth (updated reference in note 2) on 28 January 2012@19:11:34.

Headword: *)aga/lmata
Adler number: alpha,133
Translated headword: delights, ornaments, statues
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the likenesses of the gods, and anything that is decorative in some way. Homer [writes]: "but it is stored away as a delight for the king."[1] And Hesiod calls a necklace an "ornament";[2] but Pindar uses this term for the decoration on a tomb,[3] and Euripides uses it for the adornments for corpses.[4]
Also something in which someone takes delight.[5]
Also [sc. a term for] image, wooden statue, delight, beauty, ornament, source of pride, palm leaves,[6] [human] statues, [honorific?] inscriptions.
Paintings and [human] statues are also called agalmata.[7]
agalmation [is] the diminutive form.
Greek Original:
*)aga/lmata: ta\ tw=n qew=n mimh/mata, kai\ pa/nta ta\ ko/smou tino\s mete/xonta. *(/omhros: basilh=i+ de\ kei=tai a)/galma. kai\ *(hsi/odos to\n o(/rmon a)/galma kalei=: *pi/ndaros de\ th\n e)pi\ ta/fou sth/lhn ou(/tw kalei=, *eu)ripi/dhs to\n e)pi\ nekroi=s ko/smon. kai\ e)f' w(=| tis a)ga/lletai. kai\ to\ ei)/dwlon, bre/tas, xa/rma, kallonh\, ko/smos, kau/xhma, qalloi\, a)ndria/ntes, e)pigrafai/. *)aga/lmata de\ kai\ ta\s grafa\s kai\ tou\s a)ndria/ntas le/gousin. *)agalma/tion de\ u(pokoristikw=s.
Notes:
The (neuter) headword is the plural of alpha 131 (and cf. alpha 132). It is perhaps, though not necessarily, quoted from somewhere.
[1] Homer, Iliad 4.144 (web address 1), on an ivory cheek-piece for a horse.
[2] This fragment of Hesiod (142 Merkelbach-West, 233 Rzach) is not known from any other source. It may pertain to the story of Europa in the Catalogue of Women.
[3] Pindar, Nemean Odes 10.125 (67 Bowra): web address 2.
[4] Euripides, Alcestis 613: web address 3.
[5] Already at alpha 131.
[6] Used as prizes for victors in competition.
[7] Same material in Photius (Lexicon alpha92 Theodoridis) and elsewhere; cf. Kassel-Austin, PCG II p.365 (on Antiphanes fr.102).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: art history; athletics; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; poetry; religion; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 12 January 1999@12:39:04.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (cosmetics) on 29 June 2000@22:39:50.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 17 February 2003@05:54:38.
Jennifer Benedict (cleaned up links) on 26 March 2008@01:00:28.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:07:43.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7) on 16 August 2013@07:56:54.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7; another keyword) on 22 December 2014@04:58:33.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 6 November 2016@12:23:04.

Headword: *)agalmatopoioi/
Adler number: alpha,135
Translated headword: statue-makers, sculptors
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
That is, craftsmen; these [are] in the strict sense Lysippus, Polycleitus, Pheidias.[1]
Greek Original:
*)agalmatopoioi/: toute/sti xeirourgoi/: ou(=toi a)kribei=s *lu/sippos, *polu/kleitos, *feidi/as.
Notes:
The headword, a nominative plural, is presumably quoted from somewhere; perhaps Herodotus 2.46.2, but it may just be an internal cross-reference to chi 266.
[1] Or meaning these three are outstandingly precise (as, apparently, at chi 266).
See web address 1, web address 2, and web address 3 for information on these three sculptors of the C5 and (Lysippus) C4 BC.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: art history; biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: William Hutton on 9 February 2000@02:47:56.
Vetted by:
William Hutton on 26 June 2000@09:07:25.
Ross Scaife ✝ on 26 June 2000@09:42:10.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented note) on 16 July 2001@08:47:30.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 26 March 2008@01:01:13.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 27 March 2008@07:43:05.
David Whitehead (typo) on 23 December 2011@03:54:40.
William Hutton (updated links) on 18 August 2013@02:32:18.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note) on 19 August 2013@00:40:55.

Headword: *)/agis, *)/agidos
Adler number: alpha,239
Translated headword: Agis, (genitive) Agidos
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The son of Pausanias.[1] This man, during an invasion of Mantinean territory once, besieged them and, having turned the flow of the river[2] against the wall, he weakened it; for it was of unbaked brick, which is more secure against siege-engines than baked brick or stones. For those break and jump out of their fittings, whereas unbaked brick is not affected in the same way. It is, though, destroyed by water, no less than beeswax is by the sun.
Greek Original:
*)/agis, *)/agidos. o( *pausani/ou. ou(=tos e)mbalw/n pote e)s th\n *mantineikh\n, au)tou\s me\n kate/kleise, to\n de\ pararre/onta potamo\n e)s to\ tei=xos paratre/yas pare/lusen: h)=n ga\r e)c w)mh=s pli/nqou, h(/tis pro\s me\n ta\s e(lepo/leis a)sfaleste/ra e)sti\ th=s o)pth=s kai\ tw=n li/qwn. oi( me\n ga\r kata/gnuntai kai\ e)kphdw=si tw=n a(rmoni/wn: h( de\ w)mh\ pli/nqos ou)x o(moi/ws ponei=. dialu/etai de\ u(po\ u(/datos ou)x h(=sson h)\ u(po\ h(li/ou khro/s.
Notes:
[1] This patronymic, together with the episode about to be related, makes it clear that the Suda is in error: the Spartan king in question here was Agesipolis I (reigned 395-380 BCE). The source, followed very closely, is Pausanias 8.8.7-8; again at pi 1777.
[2] The R.Ophis.
Keywords: biography; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; history; military affairs; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@14:16:39.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; added notes) on 18 September 2000@10:33:32.
David Whitehead (added cross-reference and more keywords; cosmetics) on 23 October 2001@06:25:59.
David Whitehead on 4 January 2012@04:46:01.

Headword: *)agkw/n
Adler number: alpha,249
Translated headword: elbow
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"In the royal palace of Gelimer was a building full of darkness, which the Carthaginians used to call [the] Elbow; therein were thrown all toward whom the tyrant was ill-disposed. There, in the time of Belisarius, happened to be confined many traders from the east about to be destroyed by the tyrant at that time, whom the guard of the prison released."[1]
"And he placed the siege-engines in the way that seemed most timely, and he hit both the wall-angles [angkones] and the trenches from both sides."[2]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gkw=nes, a certain part of the house.[3]
Another meaning of a)gkw=nes is everything that, in a dream, fixes the well-ordered aspect of life.[4]
*)agkw=nes [are] also the prominences of rivers, the ones at the banks.
"It was not possible to sail through to the stream ahead because of the size of the descending prominences which it was necessary for those dragging the ships to bend round."[5]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gkw=nes, [in the sense of] the heights of the mountains. "Some of you seek out the [western] heights, and some the eastern, going toward the evil exit of the man."[6]
And [there is] a proverbial expression: wiping one's nose with the elbow.[7]
Bion the philosopher said: "my father was a freed slave, wiping his nose with his elbow;" it indicated clearly the saltfish-importer.[8]
See another proverbial expression, 'sweet bend' [in a river, etc.].[9]
Greek Original:
*)agkw/n: e)n th=| basilikh=| au)lh=| tou= *geli/meros oi)/khma h)=n sko/tous a)na/plewn, o(\ dh\ *)agkw=na e)ka/loun oi( *karxhdo/nioi: e)/nqa e)neba/llonto a(/pantes oi(=s a)\n xalepai/noi o( tu/rannos. e)ntau=qa e)pi\ *belisari/ou polloi\ kaqeirgme/noi e)tu/gxanon tw=n e(w/|wn e)mpo/rwn, ou(\s me/llontas kat' e)kei=no kairou= a)nairei=sqai u(po\ tou= tura/nnou o( fu/lac tou= desmwthri/ou a)pe/luse. kai\ dieti/qei ta\s mhxana\s h(=| ma/lista e)do/kei kai/rion, a)gkw=nas te kai\ ta/frous e)ba/leto e(kate/rwqen. kai\ *)agkw=nes, me/ros ti th=s oi)ki/as. a)gkw=nes de\ kai\ pa/nta ta\ prosphsso/mena kat' o)/nar to\ ko/smion tou= bi/ou shmai/nei. *)agkw=nes kai\ ai( tw=n potamw=n e)coxai\, ai( para\ tai=s o)/xqais. ou) dunato\n h)=n pro\s a)nti/on to\n r(ou=n a)naplei=n dia\ to\ me/geqos tw=n prospipto/ntwn a)gkw/nwn, ou(\s e)/dei ka/mptein pare/lkontas ta\s nau=s. kai\ *)agkw=nas, ta\s a)/kras tw=n o)rw=n. oi( de\ spei/rousin a)gkw=nas, oi( d' a)nthli/ous zhtei=t' i)o/ntes t' a)ndro\s e)/codon kakh/n. kai\ paroimi/a: tw=| a)gkw=ni a)pomusso/menos. *bi/wn fhsi\n o( filo/sofos: e)mou= o( path\r me\n h)=n a)peleu/qeros, tw=| a)gkw=ni a)pomusso/menos: diedh/lou de\ to\n tarixe/mporon. zh/tei kai\ a)/llhn paroimi/an, to\ gluku\s a)gkw/n.
Notes:
[1] An abridgement of Procopius, History of the Wars of Justinian 3.20.4-7.
[2] From an unidentifiable military narrative. (For the headword in this sense see LSJ s.v., II.)
[3] For this gloss, cf. iota 552.
[4] Artemidorus 1.74; cf. omicron 349.
[5] Quotation unidentifiable.
[6] Sophocles, Ajax 805-6 (web address 1); the first adjective is garbled here.
[7] cf. Mantissa Proverbiorum 3.31 and the quotation which follows here.
[8] Diogenes Laertius 4.46.
[9] gamma 316.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: architecture; biography; chronology; daily life; dreams; economics; ethics; food; geography; historiography; history; imagery; military affairs; philosophy; proverbs; science and technology; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@13:57:02.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (supplied headword; added notes; augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@04:02:29.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@08:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 20 November 2005@10:40:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 February 2011@08:38:56.
Catharine Roth (tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 February 2011@01:08:42.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@05:46:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 30 December 2014@00:14:19.

Headword: *)/agkuran
Adler number: alpha,258
Translated headword: anchor
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Note] that Anacharsis the Scythian philosopher invented the anchor and the potter's wheel. He lived in the time of Croesus.
Greek Original:
*)/agkuran: o(/ti *)ana/xarsis *sku/qhs filo/sofos eu(=ren a)/gkuran kai\ to\n kerameiko\n troxo/n. h)=n de\ e)pi\ *kroi/sou.
Notes:
An extract from the main entry on Anacharsis (alpha 2130). The headword, part of it, is accusative singular.
Anacharsis is an important character in Book 4 of Herodotus' History; Croesus, tyrant of Lydia, is important throughout Herodotus. Anacharsis earns his fame by attempting to introduce Greek customs into Scythia, and eventually dies for it. The story of Anacharsis' inventions, however, is not found elsewhere.
Reference:
OCD(4) s.v. (p.77).
Keywords: biography; chronology; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Roger Travis on 4 October 2000@12:08:40.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added bibliography; keywords; cosmetics) on 12 February 2001@05:04:56.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, keyword, status) on 22 August 2006@22:12:29.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 23 August 2006@03:27:29.
Catharine Roth (deleted link, added keyword) on 20 October 2013@20:18:36.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 July 2014@02:42:40.

Headword: *)/agmasi
Adler number: alpha,272
Translated headword: shards
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning in/with] fragments, changes.[1]
"They had secretly thrown shards of amphorae into the marshy parts of the places."[2]
Greek Original:
*)/agmasi: kla/smasi, tropai=s. a)/gmata a)mfore/wn e)s ta\ e(lw/dh tw=n xwri/wn la/qra e)beblh/kesan.
Notes:
[1] Likewise or similarly in other lexica; references at Photius alpha203 Theodoridis. The headword, a dative plural, must be quoted from somewhere but is not independently attested.
[2] Quotation (which contains the headword noun in the accusative plural) unidentifiable; probably from a military narrative. In any event Adler tentatively suggests transmission via the Excerpta Constantini Porphyrogeniti.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; historiography; history; military affairs; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Roger Travis on 6 October 2000@12:57:13.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, augmented note, set status) on 18 June 2001@02:07:03.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 18 June 2001@03:25:29.
David Whitehead (reworked and expanded notes; more keywords) on 20 February 2011@08:48:30.
David Whitehead on 27 February 2011@04:43:09.
David Whitehead on 5 January 2012@04:55:29.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:20:50.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 14 February 2015@10:47:23.

Headword: *)ago/mfwton
Adler number: alpha,294
Translated headword: not-bolted
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. Something] not-nailed.
Greek Original:
*)ago/mfwton: to\ a)nh/lwton.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon; and Hesychius has the plural a)go/mfwta glossed with a)na/rmosta ("not-fixed"). Otherwise, this adjective is attested only -- and in the singular, as here -- in [John Chrysostom], On Martha, Mary and Lazarus (PG 10.757e), where it is used of a boat.
For go/mfoi see gamma 376.
Keywords: Christianity; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; religion; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Catharine Roth on 1 February 2001@12:27:47.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@06:44:45.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@08:46:09.

Headword: *)aggoph/nia
Adler number: alpha,298
Translated headword: angopenia
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the honeycombs of bees.[1]
That is, woven vessels; like xruseoph/nhta ["gold-woven"].[2]
Greek Original:
*)aggoph/nia: ta\ tw=n melissw=n khri/a. toute/stin a)ggei=a u(fanta/: w(s to\ xruseoph/nhta.
Notes:
[1] The headword, a single compound word in the Greek, is attested only in the Suda and, with the same glossing phrase, Hesychius alpha397; LSJ entry at web address 1. The second element of the compound could be related to ph=nos "web" and ph/nh "woof, bobbin-thread." The first part comes from a/ggos "vessel."
[2] For this adjective (attested in e.g. Euripides, Orestes 840) see LSJ s.v.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: clothing; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; trade and manufacture; tragedy; zoology
Translated by: Catharine Roth on 2 February 2001@20:59:41.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@06:54:04.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 5 January 2012@09:10:25.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 9 April 2015@08:53:36.

Headword: *)agora/zein
Adler number: alpha,300
Translated headword: to frequent the market-place; to market
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to buy something and to spend time in [the] marketplace.[1]
Aristophanes in Wealth [sc. applies this verb] to what we customarily [say] for to buy. "And to market a dress for his sisters."[2]
Greek Original:
*)agora/zein: to\ w)nei=sqai/ ti kai\ to\ e)n a)gora=| diatri/bein. *)aristofa/nhs e)n *plou/tw| e)pi\ tou= sunh/qws h(mi=n a)nti\ tou= w)nh/sasqai. kai\ tai=s a)delfai=s a)gora/sai xitw/nion.
Notes:
[1] Same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha227 Theodoridis. Denominative verb from a)gora/: LSJ entry at web address 1; cf. alpha 304 & alpha 305; also, for substance, alpha 299.
[2] Aristophanes, Plutus/Wealth 984 (web address 2), and scholia.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: clothing; comedy; daily life; definition; economics; trade and manufacture; women
Translated by: Catharine Roth on 2 February 2001@21:37:58.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@07:08:15.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@11:03:37.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, status) on 9 October 2005@16:15:08.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@09:20:06.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 5 January 2012@22:51:38.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:57:11.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 25 July 2014@20:53:58.

Headword: *)agoranomi/as
Adler number: alpha,302
Translated headword: market-supervisorship, market-supervisorships
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] auditorship/s. The term is applied to those who oversee sales in the cities.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the related concrete noun] "market-supervisors" [agoranomoi]: the officials who manage the sales in the marketplace [sc. in Athens].[2]
Aristophanes in Acharnians [writes]: "as market-supervisors of the market I appoint the three who were chosen by lot, the thongs from Leprous."[3] That is, straps, whips. For in olden days the auditors of the marketplace used to beat people with whips. And "leprous" [leprou/s] some explain as [sc. wordplay] from the verb lepein, that is, "to beat"; others from Lepreon a small town of the Peloponnese which Callimachus also mentions in the Hymns: "citadel of Kaukones, which is called Lepreion."[4] Others still [sc. derive it] from mangy cattle, since the hides of mangy cattle are tough. Still others because the Megarians, with whom he[5] is making a treaty, have mangy bodies. But better to say that [sc. there is] a place called Leproi outside the [Athenian] town-center where the tanners' shops were. There is also a mention of this in Birds: "why then do you settle [in] Helian Lepreon."[6]
Also [sc. attested is the the verb] "I supervise markets" [a)goranomw=]; [used] with a genitive.
Greek Original:
*)agoranomi/as: logisti/as. ei)/rhtai de\ e)pi\ tw=n e)piskopou/ntwn ta\ tw=n po/lewn w)/nia. kai\ *)agorano/moi, oi( ta\ kata\ th\n a)gora\n w)/nia dioikou=ntes a)/rxontes. *)aristofa/nhs *)axarneu=sin: a)gorano/mous de\ th=s a)gora=s kaqi/stamai trei=s tou\s laxo/ntas, tou\s d' i(ma/ntas e)k leprw=n. toute/sti lw/rous, fragge/lia. to\ ga\r palaio\n fragge/lois e)/tupton oi( logistai\ th=s a)gora=s. leprw=n de\ oi( me\n a)po\ tou= le/pein, o(/ e)sti tu/ptein: oi( de\ a)po\ *lepre/ou poli/smatos th=s *peloponnh/sou, h(=s me/mnhtai kai\ *kalli/maxos e)n *(/umnois: *kaukw/nwn ptoli/eqron, o(\ *le/preion pefa/tistai. oi( de\ e)k leprw=n bow=n, dia\ to\ ta\ e)k leprw=n bow=n de/rmata i)sxura\ ei)=nai. oi( de\ o(/ti oi( *megarei=s leproi\ to\ sw=ma, pro\s ou(\s spe/ndetai. a)/meinon de\ le/gein, o(/ti to/pos e)/cw tou= a)/steos *leproi\ kalou/menos, e)/nqa ta\ bursei=a h)=n. ou(= kai\ e)n *)/ornisi me/mnhtai: ti/ d' ou)=n to\n h(/lion *le/preon oi)ki/zete. kai\ *)agoranomw=: genikh=|.
Notes:
The headword -- evidently extracted from somewhere -- and primary gloss are either genitive singulars or accusative plurals.
[1] Likewise in other lexica; references at Photius alpha228 Theodoridis.
[2] From Harpokration s.v., commenting on Demosthenes 24.112 and also citing ?Aristotle, Ath.Pol. 51.1.
[3] Aristophanes, Acharnians 723-4 (web address 1), followed here by comment from the scholia there; cf. lambda 291.
[4] Callimachus, Hymn to Zeus 39.
[5] Dikaiopolis, that is, the speaker of the quotation.
[6] What seems to be a very mangled quotation from Aristophanes, Birds 150. A more correct quotation might be translated as "Why do you two not go and settle in Lepreon in Elis?" This would seem to be a reference to the Peloponnesian Lepreon and not to a Leproi outside Athens. See web address 2 below for the text of Aristophanes (and cf. lambda 288, lambda 289).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: clothing; comedy; constitution; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; history; law; medicine; poetry; rhetoric; trade and manufacture; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 30 October 2000@00:03:30.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (cosmetics; raised status) on 30 October 2000@03:28:23.
David Whitehead (restorative cosmetics) on 22 December 2002@09:24:57.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@11:02:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 July 2011@03:58:52.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 6 January 2012@01:19:18.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 18 August 2013@09:01:32.
Catharine Roth (removed a link, added cross-references) on 19 April 2020@20:16:13.

Headword: *)agora/sai
Adler number: alpha,304
Translated headword: to buy at market
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Hyperides [sc. uses this] to mean to purchase.[1]
They say a)gora/sw, a)gorw= being sub-literate;[2] there are plenty of examples everywhere, but take for instance [one] of Aristophanes, from Aiolosikon: "but hurry, there was no need to wait, since I will buy everything that you ask for all at once, madam".[3] Also [sc. attested are] agorasmata, the things that have been bought.[4]
Greek Original:
*)agora/sai: *(uperi/dhs to\ w)nh/sasqai. *)agora/sw le/gousi, to\ d' a)gorw= ba/rbaron: paradeigma/twn de\ mesta\ pa/nta, ei)lh/fqw d' o(/mws *)aristofa/nous e)c *ai)olosi/kwnos: a)ll' a)/nuson: ou) me/llein e)xrh=n, w(s a)gora/sw a(paca/panq' o(/sa keleu/eis, w)= gu/nai. kai\ *)agora/smata au)ta\ ta\ h)gorasme/na.
Notes:
[1] From Harpokration s.v., citing Hyperides fr. 70 Jensen for this aorist infinitive of a)gora/zw (cf. alpha 300); See also a)gora/zei in For Lykophron 2.
[2] At issue here are two forms of the 1st person singular, future indicative active. The former (for which cf. alpha 305) is proper Attic form, the latter koine.
[3] Aristophanes fr. 2 Kock and K.-A.
[4] Attested in comedy and oratory.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; rhetoric; trade and manufacture
Translated by: William Hutton on 30 October 2000@00:36:57.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and note; added note; cosmetics) on 30 October 2000@03:37:57.
David Whitehead (restorative and other cosmetics) on 17 February 2003@06:00:38.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@11:05:29.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks) on 20 July 2011@04:12:46.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 22 December 2014@06:07:53.

Headword: *)agora/sw
Adler number: alpha,305
Translated headword: I will go to market
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Meaning I will spend time in [the] marketplace. Aristophanes [writes]: "and I will go to market in arms alongside Aristogeiton."[1] Meaning I will spend time in the market with Aristogeiton, near Aristogeiton.[2] That is,[3] "in a myrtle branch we will carry our sword, just like Harmodios and Aristogeiton". For they, having drawn their swords from myrtle branches, struck down the tyrant.
Greek Original:
*)agora/sw: a)nti\ tou= e)n a)gora=| diatri/yw. *)aristofa/nhs: a)gora/sw t' e)n toi=s o(/plois e(ch=s *)aristogei/toni. a)nti\ tou= e)n th=| a)gora=| diatri/yw meta\ *)aristogei/tonos, e)ggu\s *)aristogei/tonos. toute/stin e)n mursi/nw| kla/dw| to\ ci/fos fore/somen, w(/sper *(armo/dios kai\ *)aristogei/twn. ou(=toi ga\r a)po\ tw=n mursi/nwn kla/dwn ta\ ci/fh a)naspa/santes to\n tu/rannon kate/balon.
Notes:
See also epsilon 1384, phi 592.
[1] Aristophanes, Lysistrata 633 (web address 1 below), with comment from the scholia there.
[2] On the statues of the tyrannicides (see further, next note) Aristogeiton and Harmodios in the Athenian Agora, see in brief J.M. Camp, The Athenian Agora (London 1986) 38; cf. OCD(4) s.v. Aristogiton (pp.156-7); and at length M.W. Taylor, The Tyrant Slayers (New York 1981) 51-77.
[3] What follows this less-than-apposite opening is a line from one of the skolia (drinking songs) -- best preserved in Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 15.695A-B [15.50 Kaibel] -- which commemorated the assassination of Hipparchos in 514 BCE. See generally M. Ostwald, Nomos and the Beginnings of the Athenian Democracy (Oxford 1969) 121-136.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; botany; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; history; military affairs; meter and music; politics; trade and manufacture
Translated by: William Hutton on 30 October 2000@00:44:39.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; cosmetics) on 30 October 2000@04:35:33.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@11:05:58.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; x-refs; more keywords) on 28 February 2006@03:08:29.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@09:28:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 July 2014@02:58:03.
David Whitehead (typo; other tweaking) on 9 April 2015@09:02:53.

Headword: *)agora=s w(/ran
Adler number: alpha,306
Translated headword: market's hour, market's time
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning the hour/time] not for selling things, but for the other transactions that go on in the marketplace at dawn, or indeed before the marketplace gets full.[1] Pherekrates [writes]: "always to drink and get drunk before the marketplace gets full".[2]
Greek Original:
*)agora=s w(/ran: ou) tw=n pwloume/nwn, a)lla\ tw=n a)/llwn pra/cewn tw=n kat' a)gora\n e(/wqen, h)\ kai\ pri\n a)gora\n peplhqe/nai. *ferekra/ths: pi/nein a)ei\ kai\ mequ/ein pri\n a)gora\n peplhqe/nai.
Notes:
Same entry, but slightly fuller, in Photius (Lexicon alpha238 Theodoridis) and elsewhere; see further, next note.
[1] Theodoridis (above) prints Croenert's h(=ke for h)\ kai/ and thereby sees in this entry two fragments of Pherekrates (cf. next note) -- this first one being "he came at dawn before the marketplace gets full".
[2] Pherekrates fr. 29 Kock, now 34 K.-A. -- an extract which, as can readily be seen, connects with the glossing material rather than with the (proverbial?) phrase glossed. See also fr. 178 K.-A.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; food; trade and manufacture
Translated by: William Hutton on 30 October 2000@00:49:20.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 30 October 2000@04:42:52.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@11:06:53.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@09:42:55.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@09:05:47.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@10:35:41.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 26 December 2014@04:36:00.

Headword: *)agorai=oi
Adler number: alpha,309
Translated headword: marketplace [men]
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Has circumflex accent on the penultimate syllable; [meaning] men involved in a marketplace.[1]
Damascius [writes]: "[...] but he stood by and begged those who were defrauding, even including (?)skilled judges."[2]
But with the acute accent on the second syllable a)go/raios [is] the day on which the market is held.[3]
Greek Original:
*)agorai=oi: properispwme/nws: oi( e)n a)gora=| a)nastrefo/menoi a)/nqrwpoi. *dama/skios: o( de\ pari/stato kai\ e)ch/|tei toi=s a)posterou=si me/xri kai\ dikastw=n a)gorai/wn. proparocuto/nws de\ *)ago/raios, h( h(me/ra e)n h(=| h( a)gora\ telei=tai.
Notes:
[1] See LSJ s.v. and cf. generally alpha 308. The present nominative plural headword and substantive gloss ('men involved in a marketplace') also occur in other lexica (references at Photius alpha232 Theodoridis); Latte on Hesychius claims the headword as stemming from Acts 17.5 (genitive plural).
[2] Damascius, Life of Isidore fr. 53 Zintzen (24 Asmus). A fuller version of the fragment is given at pi 658, where Adler notes several attempts, by her predecessors, to improve its wording. With or without them, the nature and identity of these dikastai agoraioi is unclear.
[3] LSJ s.v., III 1, where the distinction of meaning between a)go/raios "vulgar" and a)gorai=os "public speaker" is said to be fictitious. Note that section 2b is deleted by the LSJ Supplement. The shift of properispomenon to proparoxytone is a regular phenomenon of the Attic dialect, known as Vendryes' Law: see Kuehner-Blass #80 (web address 1); it is still possible, however, that the properispomenon form could have been restored in the productive category, where it is more closely asssociated with a)gora/.
Reference:
J. Kuryłowicz, L'accentuation des langues indo-européennes (Wroclaw 1958) 159-161
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; Christianity; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; law; religion; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Catharine Roth on 9 March 2001@12:25:41.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword; cosmetics) on 10 March 2001@08:43:44.
Catharine Roth (Revised grammatical note.) on 10 March 2001@11:36:25.
Catharine Roth (augmented grammatical note, added bibliography) on 4 April 2001@10:44:08.
David Whitehead (augmented Damascius ref; cosmetics) on 14 April 2004@07:40:52.
David Whitehead (tweaked translation) on 20 April 2005@08:14:54.
David Whitehead (augmented n.1; added a keyword) on 20 April 2005@09:59:36.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@11:08:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 9 October 2005@16:17:44.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 18 September 2010@01:21:55.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 18 September 2010@07:04:16.
Catharine Roth (tweaked links) on 5 January 2012@22:58:39.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 6 January 2012@03:24:49.
David Whitehead on 19 August 2013@03:57:45.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 19 August 2013@10:26:33.

Headword: *)/agousan
Adler number: alpha,316

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