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Headword: *)abi/wton
Adler number: alpha,49
Translated headword: unlivable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] bad [and] annoying, painful.[1]
"He found it an unlivable situation if he could not control the city".[2]
Also [sc. attested is the masculine] a)bi/wtos, he who is not alive.[3]
Greek Original:
*)abi/wton: kako\n a)hde\s, o)dunhro/n. o( de\ a)biw/tws ei)=xen, ei) mh\ krath/soi th=s po/lews. kai\ *)abi/wtos, o( mh\ zw=n.
Notes:
[1] Same material in other lexica; references at Photius alpha39 Theodoridis. The headword -- shown by the glossing to be neuter nominative/accusative singular rather than masculine accusative singular -- is evidently quoted from somewhere. The possibilities are numerous. (Latte on Hesychius s.v. confidently asserts Euripides, Alcestis 242.)
[2] Quotation unidentifiable -- but perhaps from Plutarch, who has several instances of the idiom a)biw/tws e)/xein.
[3] For this word see also alpha 50.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; history; politics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:01:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation, raised status) on 29 January 2001@17:14:44.
William Hutton (Added note) on 29 January 2001@17:18:16.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics; raised status) on 30 January 2001@03:39:11.
David Whitehead on 30 January 2001@03:40:51.
David Whitehead (restorative cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:57:16.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@07:44:30.
David Whitehead on 19 December 2011@07:45:11.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@05:18:15.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:43:40.

Headword: *(abroko/mas
Adler number: alpha,83
Translated headword: Abrokomas, Habrokomas, Abrocomas
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This man was satrap[1] under Artaxerxes, king of the Persians.[2]
Greek Original:
*(abroko/mas: ou(=tos satra/phs h)=n *)artace/rcou tou= *persw=n basile/ws.
Notes:
From Harpokration (and Photius) s.v. The name has a smooth breathing (Abrokomas) there, as in Xenophon before them (below); in the Suda it is rough (Habrokomas).
[1] Provincial governor; see sigma 153 (and generally OCD(4) p.1321).
[2] There were several Persian kings of this name (see generally OCD(4) p.175), but probably Artaxerxes II (405/4-359/8) is meant; he had a general called Abrokomas, mentioned by Xenophon in the Anabasis.
Keywords: biography; chronology; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; historiography; history; military affairs; politics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:36:18.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headword, notes, keyword; cosmetics) on 29 September 2000@05:33:34.
William Hutton (Cosmetics) on 1 February 2001@00:51:03.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 July 2011@09:44:36.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 21 December 2011@01:44:30.
David Whitehead (updated 2 refs) on 29 July 2014@12:13:20.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 2 April 2015@11:02:29.

Headword: *)agaqoklh=s
Adler number: alpha,117
Translated headword: Agathokles, Agathocles
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This man became tyrant [of Syracuse] and, as Timaeus says, in his early youth was a common prostitute, ready [to give himself] to the most debauched, a jackdaw, a buzzard,[1] presenting his backside to all who wanted it. When he died, says [Timaeus], his wife cried out to him in lamentation, "What [did] I not [carnally do to] you? And what [did] you not [reciprocate to] me?"[2] That nature had endowed Agathokles with great advantages is clear. For escaping the wheel, the smoke[of the kiln and] the clay,[3] he came to Syracuse, at about the age of eighteen, and in a short time, starting from such beginnings, he became master of the whole of Sicily, exposed the Carthaginians to extreme dangers, and finally, having grown old in the role of dynast, ended his life with the title of king.[4]
Greek Original:
*)agaqoklh=s: ou(=tos e)ge/neto tu/rannos kai\, w(/s fhsi *ti/maios, kata\ th\n prw/thn h(liki/an koino\s po/rnos, e(/toimos toi=s a)kratesta/tois, koloio\s, trio/rxhs, pa/ntwn tw=n boulome/nwn toi=s o)/pisqen e)/mprosqen gegonw/s. o(\s o(/te a)pe/qane, th\n gunai=ka fhsi\ kataklaiome/nhn au)to\n ou(/tw qrhnei=n: ti/ d' ou)k e)gw\ se/; ti/ d' ou)k e)me\ su/; o(/ti de\ e)k fu/sews a)na/gkh mega/la proterh/mata gegone/nai peri\ to\n *)agaqokle/a, tou=to dh=lon. ei)s ga\r ta\s *surakou/sas paregenh/qh feu/gwn to\n troxo\n, to\n kapno\n, to\n phlo\n, peri/ te th\n h(liki/an o)ktwkai/deka e)/th gegonw\s, kai\ meta/ tina xro/non o(rmhqei\s u(po\ toiau/ths u(poqe/sews, ku/rios me\n e)genh/qh pa/shs *sikeli/as, megi/stois de\ kindu/nois perie/sthse *karxhdoni/ous, te/los e)gghra/sas th=| dunastei/a|, kate/streye to\n bi/on basileu\s prosagoreuo/menos.
Notes:
360-289 BCE; he ruled Syracuse from 317-289. See generally OCD(4) p.36, under Agathocles(1).
The entry presents a semi-verbatim and mildly abridged extract from Polybius (12.15.2-7: web address 1 below), who is in turn citing, disapprovingly, Timaeus of Tauromenium (FGrH 566 F124b).
[1] On this passage K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality (London 1978) p.103 writes: 'The jackdaw here probably sybolises impudence and shamelessness; the buzzard, in Greek triorkhes, having three testicles, presumably symbolises insatiable lust, which is assumed to characterise the true pornos'. Cf. tau 995, where the first part of this quotation reappears.
[2] Probably Theoxene, the daughter or stepdaughter of Ptolemy I Soter and the third wife of Agathokles. See F.W. Walbank, A historical commentary on Polybius (Oxford, 1967) v.2 p.361.
[3] His father owned a large pottery. See Diodorus 19.2.7; 20.63.4. As with equivalent figures in (e.g.) late-C5 Athens, such as Kleon, we see here the conceit that those whose wealth lay in manufacture would actually participate in (and be debased by) the actual manufacturing.
[4] Agathokles assumed the title of king in 305. See Diodorus 20.54.1.
References:
Berve, H., Die Herrschaft des Agathokles (Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1953)
Agathokles(15) in RE 1.1 748-757
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; constitution; daily life; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; history; politics; trade and manufacture; women; zoology
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@10:07:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 6 June 2001@00:10:30.
Tony Natoli (Modified translation, added notes and bibliography, raised status.) on 12 August 2001@02:19:21.
David Whitehead (restorative and other cosmetics) on 17 September 2002@05:10:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@10:59:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 20 November 2005@10:37:08.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:30:36.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:16:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:23:59.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:51:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 17 February 2018@23:14:40.

Headword: *)agasiklh=s
Adler number: alpha,169
Translated headword: Agasikles, Agasicles
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name. He is said to have bribed[1] the Halimousians, and for that reason, although he was a foreigner, to have been accorded [sc. Athenian] citizenship.[2]
Greek Original:
*)agasiklh=s: o)/noma ku/rion. o(\s le/getai *(alimousi/nois sundika/sai kai\ dia\ tou=to ce/nos w)\n e)ggrafh=nai th=| politei/a|.
Notes:
After the initial generic gloss, this entry is abridged from Harpokration s.v.
[1] Reading sundeka/sai for the transmitted sundika/sai ("to share in judging"). See LSJ s.v. sundeka/zw at web address 1; see also n. 1 to alpha 1231.
[2] This is RE Agasikles 2; his claim to Athenian citizenship was contested in a speech by Dinarchus.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; constitution; definition; economics; ethics; history; law; politics; rhetoric
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 7 June 1999@11:24:47.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation, with explanatory note.) on 15 September 2000@06:18:36.
David Whitehead on 15 September 2000@06:20:34.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@11:01:00.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode, added link, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@01:51:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 27 March 2008@08:39:44.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 19 July 2011@09:57:12.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 5 April 2015@21:47:43.

Headword: *)age/neia
Adler number: alpha,197
Translated headword: low birth
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Bad birth.
Greek Original:
*)age/neia: h( dusge/neia.
Notes:
The headword literally means lack of birth. It is first attested in the Politics of Aristotle 6.1317b40 (web address 1 below) where a)ge/neia, peni/a and banausi/a are the defining characteristics, from a hostile standpoint, of democracy.
Similar entry in Hesychius, but in the accusative case and with the two nouns reversed.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: constitution; daily life; definition; ethics; philosophy; politics
Translated by: William Hutton on 17 October 2000@02:31:44.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 25 April 2002@10:02:20.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, betacode) on 26 March 2008@02:11:08.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:46:46.
David Whitehead (another note) on 29 December 2011@07:40:46.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 31 December 2011@18:20:24.

Headword: *)agkuloxei/lhs kai\ *)agkulo/xeilos
Adler number: alpha,255

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