Suda On Line menu Search

Home
Search results for daily life in Keyword:
Greek display:    

Headword: *)/abra
Adler number: alpha,68
Translated headword: favorite
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Not simply a maidservant nor even the pretty maidservant is called [favorite], but a daughter of one of the house slaves and an honored one, whether born in the house or not. Menander in False Heracles [writes]: "the mother of these two sisters is dead. A concubine of their father's, who used to be their mother's favorite slave, is bringing them up."[1] In Sikyonian: "he bought a beloved slave instead and did not hand the slave over to his wife, but kept her apart, as is appropriate for a free woman."[2] In Faithless One: "I thought if the old man got the gold, he'd get himself a favorite slave right away."[3]
Iamblichus [writes]: "since this was difficult and something of a rarity, with the [woman] housekeeper on guard and another favorite slave-woman also present, he persuades the daughter to run away without her parents' knowledge."[4]
Greek Original:
*)/abra: ou)/te a(plw=s qera/paina ou)/te h( eu)/morfos qera/paina le/getai, a)ll' oi)ko/triy gunaiko\s ko/rh kai\ e)/ntimos, ei)/te oi)kogenh\s ei)/te mh/. *me/nandros *yeudhraklei=: mh/thr te/qnhke tai=n a)delfai=n tai=n duei=n tau/tain. tre/fei de\ pallakh/ tis tou= patro\s au)ta\s, a)/bra th=s mhtro\s au)tw=n genome/nh. *sikuwni/w|: kai\ a)/bran ga\r a)ntwnou/menos e)rwme/nhn, tau/th| me\n ou) pare/dwk' e)/xein, tre/fein de\ xwri\s, w(s e)leuqe/ra| pre/pei. *)api/stw|: w)/mhn ei) to\ xrusi/on la/boi o( ge/rwn, qera/painan eu)qu\s h)gorasme/nhn a)/bran e)/sesqai. *)ia/mblixos: e)pei\ de\ tou=to xalepo\n h)=n kai\ spa/nio/n ti to\ th=s oi)kourou= fulattou/shs kai\ a)/bras tino\s a)/llhs sumparou/shs, a)napei/qei th\n ko/rhn laqou=san tou\s gonei=s a)podra=nai.
Notes:
The main part of this entry is also in Photius, Lexicon alpha50 Theodoridis (where the headword is plural); similar material in other lexica.
LSJ uses the rough breathing (a(/bra) for the word it defines specifically as 'favorite slave'. See web address 1 below.
[1] Menander fr. 520 Kock, 453 K.-Th., 411 K.-A.
[2] Menander fr. 438 Kock (1 Sandbach).
[3] Menander fr. 64 Kock, 58 K.-Th., 63 K.-A.
[4] Iamblichus, Babyloniaca fr. 56 Habrich.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; gender and sexuality; philosophy; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:13:15.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:59:03.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added link) on 30 January 2001@23:04:27.
David Whitehead (added keyword) on 31 January 2001@04:33:38.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 24 April 2002@03:20:49.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 15 August 2007@10:03:18.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:26:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:03:54.
David Whitehead (updated refs) on 16 August 2013@07:04:59.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@03:49:04.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@06:54:57.

Headword: *(abrai=s
Adler number: alpha,73
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] gentle, dainty.[1] Aelian [writes]: "them placing [half-beams] upon very delicate couches and mattresses adorned with some magnificent weaving."[2]
Greek Original:
*(abrai=s: a(palai=s, truferai=s. *ai)liano/s: e)pi\ kli/nais ma/la a(brai=s kai\ strwmnai=s u(/fei tini\ u(perhfa/nw| kekosmhme/nais e)piqe/ntas.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 70.
[1] The headword is dative plural of this adjective, presumably extracted from the quotation given.
[2] A truncated version of Aelian fr. 53h Domingo-Forasté (50 Hercher); more fully at delta 75, and see also upsilon 290.
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:29:17.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added keyword, set status) on 31 January 2001@13:01:14.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 1 February 2001@03:53:15.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:25:52.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 28 January 2012@18:56:48.
David Whitehead (another x-ref; cosmetics) on 17 January 2014@04:28:35.

Headword: *)abri/cai
Adler number: alpha,79
Translated headword: to drop off, to nod off
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to be drowsy after eating[1] or to fall asleep.
Greek Original:
*)abri/cai: to\ a)po\ bora=s nusta/cai h)\ koimhqh=nai.
Notes:
Likewise in ps.-Zonaras. The headword, presumably quoted from somewhere, is an aorist active infinitive. LSJ proffers no suitable verb for it under alpha, but see the entry on bri/zw, 'to be sleepy, nod'. (Adler notes that after beta 542 ms F has the entry Bri/zw: to\ nusta/zw.)
[1] This much also occurs, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon.
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:33:30.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set keywords and status) on 31 January 2001@13:22:44.
David Whitehead (modified headword; added note) on 27 February 2003@08:52:09.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@09:53:30.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note) on 2 April 2015@10:50:15.

Headword: *(abro/n
Adler number: alpha,86
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In Herodotus [sc. this means something] beautiful, stubborn, awe-inspiring, dainty.
Greek Original:
*(abro/n: para\ *(hrodo/tw| kalo\n, au)/qades, semno\n, trufero/n.
Note:
The headword adjective is neuter nominative (and accusative) singular of alpha 87 (and cf. alpha 88), extracted here from Herodotus 1.71.4 (web address 1), and accompanied by ancient glosses on that passage. In fact, 'luxurious' or 'soft-living' would be more appropriate; cf. a(bro/tatoi in 4.104 (web address 2), and Powell s.v.
Reference:
J.E. Powell, A Lexicon to Herodotus. Hildesheim: George Olms 1977
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:38:32.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, augmented note, added bibliography and keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@09:51:15.
William Hutton (Modified my own note, added links) on 1 February 2001@14:00:33.
David Whitehead (modified note; cosmetics) on 5 February 2003@09:50:33.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 December 2011@09:37:09.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 21 December 2011@01:53:17.

Headword: *(abro/s
Adler number: alpha,87
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] bright, delicate, tender.[1]
In the Epigrams: "a cicada sat above a cithara delicately murmuring."[2]
"All the same that fellow is dainty and delicate and weakened by the softness of his body and depraved and with his hair done up like the most licentious little courtesans. And when he goes in to see the king his face and his curly hair are always delicately dripping [with perfume], and he takes as much money from the communal difficulties as would satisfy even the legendary Midas."[3]
Greek Original:
*(abro/s: lampro\s, trufero\s, a(palo/s. e)n *)epigra/mmasin: a(bro\n e)pitru/zwn kiqa/ras u(/per e(/zeto te/ttic. o(/mws de\ o( trufero\s e)kei=nos kai\ a(bro\s kai\ u(po\ malaki/as tou= sw/matos kateagw\s kai\ lelugisme/nos kai\ ta/s te ko/mas a)nadou/menos, w(/sper ai( tw=n e(tairi/dwn a)selge/sterai, kai\ a(brostage\s e)/xwn a)ei\ to\ me/twpon kai\ tou\s bostru/xous, labw\n xrusi/on e)k tw=n koinw=n sumforw=n, o(/son i(kano\n h)=n e)mplh=sai kai\ to\n e)k tou= mu/qou *mi/dan, ei)se/rrei pro\s to\n basile/a.
Notes:
For this adjective see already alpha alpha 73 and alpha 86, and again alpha 88.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha55 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.54.7 (Paulus Silentarius).
[3] Attributed by Hemsterhuys to Eunapius; again (in part) at alpha 1860.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; imagery; mythology; poetry; women; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:39:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@12:21:50.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:35:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 January 2006@10:26:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@04:35:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 December 2011@19:16:16.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:18:56.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:31:02.

Headword: *(abrosu/nh
Adler number: alpha,89
Translated headword: splendor
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] brightness.
Greek Original:
*(abrosu/nh: faidro/ths.
Notes:
The rare headword noun (also in other lexica, with the same gloss) is a poetic variant of a(bro/ths; see LSJ s.v. Though it is attested in Sappho and elsewhere, its inclusion here seems to have been prompted by its occurrence in Euripides, Orestes 349 (so Latte on Hesychius s.v.); cf. the scholia there.
cf. generally alpha 86, alpha 87, alpha 88. For the glossing noun see also the gloss at pi 138.
Keywords: daily life; definition; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:40:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, cosmetics, set keywords & status) on 1 February 2001@21:30:02.
David Whitehead (x-refs) on 3 January 2005@10:39:54.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords) on 21 December 2011@04:44:38.
David Whitehead (tweaked note) on 1 February 2012@05:40:54.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 4 April 2015@08:08:49.

Headword: *)/abrwn
Adler number: alpha,97
Translated headword: Abron, Habron
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Phrygian or Rhodian, grammarian, student of Tryphon,[1] sophist at Rome, the offspring of slaves, according to Hermippus.[2]
Greek Original:
*)/abrwn: *fru\c h)\ *(ro/dios, grammatiko\s, maqhth\s *tru/fwnos, sofisteu/sas e)n *(rw/mh|, gegonw\s de\ e)k dou/lwn, w(/s fhsin *(/ermippos.
Notes:
Presumably Habron (the aspirated version of the name is the more authentic), RE 8.2155 #4 (and OCD(4) s.v.), author of a treatise On the Pronoun in the C1 CE.
[1] Tryphon: tau 1115.
[2] For Hermippus see epsilon 3045. This is his fr. 73 FHG (3.52).
Reference:
R. Berndt, 'Die Fragmente des Grammatikers Habron', Berliner philologioscher Wochenschrift 35 (1915) 1452-1455, 1483
Keywords: biography; daily life; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; philosophy; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:46:35.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@22:49:38.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and bibliography) on 2 February 2001@03:41:19.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, cross-reference) on 9 December 2009@17:25:23.
David Whitehead (added bibligraphy and another keyword) on 21 December 2011@06:41:35.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 17 January 2014@04:59:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:16:02.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:50:39.

Headword: *)/abudos
Adler number: alpha,101
Translated headword: Abudos, Abydos, Abydus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A city.[1]
The word is applied to an informant [sukofa/nths] because of the common belief that the people of Abudos were informers.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] an adverb, *)abudo/qi, [meaning] in Abudos.[3]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] *a)/budon fluari/an ["Abudos nonsense"], [meaning] great [nonsense].[4]
And [sc. attested is] *)abudhno\s, [meaning] he [who comes] from Abudos.[5]
Greek Original:
*)/abudos: po/lis. e)pi\ sukofa/ntou ta/ttetai h( le/cis, dia\ to\ dokei=n sukofa/ntas ei)=nai tou\s *)abudhnou/s. kai\ e)pi/rrhma, *)abudo/qi, e)n *)abu/dw|. kai\ *)/abudon fluari/an, th\n pollh/n. kai\ *)abudhno\s, o( a)po\ *)abu/dou.
Notes:
[1] = Lexicon Ambrosianum 82, according to Adler. In fact two cities of this name are known: one on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid G4; present-day Maltepe) and Abydos/Ebot in Upper Egypt (Barrington Atlas map 77 grid F4); without much doubt, the former is meant here. (In Hesychius alpha23 the gloss is fuller -- 'a Trojan city of the Hellespont'. Latte regards the entry as prompted by Homer, Iliad 2.836, accusative case, although similar wording appears in a late scholion to Iliad 17.584, where the adverbial derivative a)budo/qi appears -- see n. 3 below). See also alpha 100, sigma 465, and generally OCD(4) s.v.
[2] = the first sentence of Pausanias the Atticist alpha3 and Photius alpha63 Theodoridis; cf. also Zenobius 1.1, s.v. *)abudhno\n e)pifo/rhma (alpha 100), and Kassel-Austin, PCG III.2 p.376 on Aristophanes fr. 755. See generally sigma 1330, sigma 1331, sigma 1332.
[3] Probably from commentary to Homer, Iliad 17.584, the only literary attestation of this adverb prior to Musaeus Grammaticus (5/6 CE); cf. Apollonius Dyscolus On Adverbs 2.1.1.164.
[4] = Synagoge Codex B alpha44, but in the better mss of Photius (Lexicon alpha64 Theodoridis) the adjective (in a nominative-case entry) is a)/buqos ('bottomless'), surely correctly; cf. alpha 104. The ultimate source may be Plato, Parmenides 130D, though there too the text is uncertain: perhaps ei)/s tin' a)/buqon fluari/an (web address 1), though the alternatives include ei)/s tina bu=qon fluari/as. On the adjective a)/buqos, a synonym for a)/bussos, see the LSJ entry at web address 2.
[5] There are many literary attestations of this form of the ethnic adjective (nominative singular masculine), beginning with Herodotus 4.138. For an instance in the Suda see pi 71.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; geography; law; philosophy; proverbs
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@13:59:06.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@21:07:09.
Ross Scaife ✝ (fixed keywords) on 2 March 2000@17:48:48.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; replaced existing note; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:05:35.
Jennifer Benedict (added links, betacode fix, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:03:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 18 April 2011@14:40:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 25 April 2011@04:09:51.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@09:19:59.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1) on 1 February 2012@05:52:37.
David Whitehead (expansions to notes) on 16 August 2013@07:33:01.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 4 July 2014@08:19:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:21:46.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:35:15.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 22 December 2014@09:26:49.

Headword: *)agaqa/
Adler number: alpha,108
Translated headword: goods, goodies
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Xenophon used the word of foodstuffs and drinks which bring enjoyment and good cheer.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Good Things Kilikon" - with "has" omitted. Kilikon [is] a proper name. He was wealthy.[2]
Greek Original:
*)agaqa/: e)pi\ tw=n pro\s a)po/lausin kai\ eu)wxi/an siti/wn kai\ potw=n e)xrh/sato *cenofw=n th=| le/cei. kai\ *)agaqa\ *kili/kwn, lei/pei to\ e)/xei. *kili/kwn de\ o)/noma ku/rion. eu)/poros de\ h)=n.
Notes:
[1] Xenophon, Anabasis 4.4.9 (web address 1 below).
[2] This is only one possible explanation of the proverbial phrase. For another, probably better one - with another version of the name (Killikon: apparently authentic, as it derives from Aristophanes, Peace 363 [web address 2 below]) - see kappa 1610; but note also kappa 223 and pi 2040 on "Kallikon".
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: aetiology; biography; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; food; historiography; proverbs
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:14:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added links, set status) on 8 June 2001@01:15:16.
David Whitehead (added keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:00:27.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:19:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:18:17.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 22 December 2011@03:59:55.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 23 December 2011@18:41:14.

Headword: *)agaqo/n
Adler number: alpha,118
Translated headword: good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In general [it is] something beneficial, but in particular what is either identical with or not different from benefit; hence, both virtue itself and what participates in it are called "good" in three ways: as the good (i) from which [being benefited] results, [and (ii) according to which being benefited results,] as [virtuous] action and virtue,[1] and (iii) by whom [being benefited results], as the virtuous person who participates in virtue. Or [they define it [2]] in this fashion: the good is the perfection in accordance with nature of a rational being qua rational. And virtue is a thing of this sort, so that virtuous action as well as virtuous people participate [in the good]. Joy, cheerfulness and the like are byproducts [of virtue]. Furthermore, of goods, some are in the soul, others external, and others neither in the soul nor external. The ones in the soul are virtues and actions in accordance with them. The external ones are a virtuous fatherland, a virtuous friend, and their happiness. Those which are neither external nor in the soul are someone's being for himself virtuous and happy. Furthermore, of goods, some are final, others instrumental, and others both final and instrumental. Thus a friend and the benefits added by him are instrumental goods. But confidence, prudence, freedom, enjoyment, cheerfulness, freedom from distress, and every action in accordance with virtue are final. [Virtues] are instrumental and final: they are instrumental goods insofar as they produce happiness, and final [goods] insofar as they complete it in such a way as to become parts of it; for example a friend and freedom and enjoyment.[3] Furthermore, of the goods in the soul, some are conditions, others dispositions, and others neither conditions nor dispositions. Virtues are dispositions, pursuits conditions, and activities neither conditions nor dispositions. In general good children and a good old age are minor goods,[4] but knowledge is a simple good. And virtues are always present, but joy and taking a stroll for example not always. Every good is profitable, advantageous, binding, useful, serviceable, fine, beneficial, just, and choiceworthy.
That which is aimed at by all things is good.[5]
Thus that to which all things are referred but which is referred to nothing is good.[6]
Greek Original:
*)agaqo/n: koinw=s me\n to/ ti o)/felos, i)di/ws de\ h)/toi tau)to\n h)\ ou)x e(/teron w)felei/as: o(/qen au)th/n te th\n a)reth\n kai\ to\ mete/xon au)th=s a)gaqo\n trixw=s le/gesqai. oi(=on to\ a)gaqo\n, a)f' ou(= sumbai/nei, w(s th\n pra=cin kai\ th\n a)reth/n. u(f' ou(= de\, w(s to\n spoudai=on to\n mete/xonta th=s a)reth=s. h)\ ou(/tws: to\ a)gaqo\n, to\ te/leion kata\ fu/sin logikou=, h)\ w(s logikou=. toiou=to d' ei)=nai th\n a)reth\n w(s mete/xonta ta/s te pra/ceis ta\s kat' a)reth\n, kai\ to\ spoudai/ous ei)=nai. e)pigennh/mata de\ th/n te xara\n kai\ th\n eu)frosu/nhn kai\ ta\ paraplh/sia. e)/ti tw=n a)gaqw=n ta\ me\n ei)=nai peri\ yuxh/n, ta\ de\ e)kto/s, ta\ de\ ou)/te peri\ yuxh\n ou)/te e)kto/s. ta\ me\n peri\ yuxh\n a)reta\s kai\ ta\s kata\ tau/tas pra/ceis: ta\ de\ e)kto\s to/ te spoudai/an e)/xein patri/da kai\ spoudai=on fi/lon kai\ th\n tou/twn eu)daimoni/an. ta\ de\ ou)k e)kto\s ou)/te peri\ yuxh\n to\ au)to\n e(autw=| ei)=nai spoudai=on kai\ eu)dai/mona. e)/ti tw=n a)gaqw=n ta\ me\n ei)=nai telika/, ta\ de\ poihtika/, ta\ de\ telika\ kai\ poihtika/. to\n me\n ou)=n fi/lon kai\ ta\s u(p' au)tou= prosginome/nas w)felei/as poihtika\ ei)=nai a)gaqa/: qa/rsos de\ kai\ fro/nhma kai\ e)leuqeri/an kai\ te/ryin kai\ eu)frosu/nhn kai\ a)lupi/an kai\ pa=san th\n kat' a)reth\n pra=cin telika/. poihtika\ de\ kai\ telika\, kaqo\ me\n poiou=si th\n eu)daimoni/an, poihtika/ e)stin a)gaqa/: kaqo\ de\ sumplhrou=sin au)th\n, w(/ste me/rh au)th=s gene/sqai, telika/: oi(=on fi/los kai\ e)leuqeri/a kai\ te/ryis. e)/ti tw=n peri\ yuxh\n a)gaqw=n ta\ me/n ei)sin e(/ceis, ta\ de\ diaqe/seis, ta\ de\ ou)/te e(/ceis ou)/te diaqe/seis. diaqe/seis me\n ai( a)retai/, e(/ceis de\ ta\ e)pithdeu/mata, ou)/te de\ e(/ceis ou)/te diaqe/seis ai( e)ne/rgeiai. koinw=s tw=n a)gaqw=n mikra\ me/n e)stin eu)tekni/a kai\ eu)ghri/a. a(plou=n de/ e)stin a)gaqo\n e)pisth/mh. kai\ a)ei\ me\n paro/nta ai( a)retai/, ou)k a)ei\ de\ oi(=on xara\, peripa/thsis. pa=n de\ a)gaqo\n lusitele\s ei)=nai kai\ sumfe/ron kai\ de/on kai\ xrh/simon kai\ eu)/xrhston kai\ kalo\n kai\ w)fe/limon kai\ di/kaion kai\ ai(reto/n. a)gaqo\n de/ e)sti to\ pa=sin e)feto/n. a)gaqo\n ou)=n e)stin, ei)s o(\ pa/nta a)nh/rthtai, au)to\ de\ ei)s mhde/n.
Notes:
See also alpha 119, likewise a neuter singular.
This entry mostly reproduces Diogenes Laertius 7.94-98 (who supposedly is quoting an extract of Stoic ethics). The Suda text contains important omissions as well as different readings (the D.L. readings are, for the most part, much better).
[1] D.L. gives th\n pra=cin th\n kat' a)reth/n, "the action according to virtue" or simply "the virtuous action", as a gloss on a second sense in which virtue and what participates in it are called "good": that according to which being benefited results.
[2] D.L. has o(ri/zontai, "they define", which makes clear that a new definition is being given here.
[3] This puzzling list of examples does not occur in D.L.
[4] The text given by Suda is misleading; D.L. gives a)gaqw=n mikta/, "mixed goods", instead of a)gaqw=n mikra/, "little goods".
[5] cf. Aristotle, Topica 1094a2-3, with Alexander of Aphrodisias's commentary 93.8.
[6] Plotinus, Enneads 1.7.1, 21-22 (identified by Henry [below] 157 n.2, as noted in Adler's addenda).
References:
J. Annas, The Morality of Happiness (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 1993
Henry, P. "Suidas, Le Larousse et le Littré de l'antiquité grecque." Les Etudes classiques (1937): 155-62
Keywords: children; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; philosophy
Translated by: Marcelo Boeri on 26 May 2000@18:40:04.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified translation, added keyword, sets status) on 6 June 2001@00:38:37.
William Hutton (Added betacoding) on 6 June 2001@00:44:50.
David Whitehead (added notes; cosmetics) on 16 January 2003@05:49:31.
David Hitchcock (Modified translation, added notes) on 24 December 2004@06:46:10.
David Hitchcock on 24 December 2004@06:51:54.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@08:00:23.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 16 November 2005@07:50:17.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:37:50.
Catharine Roth (added note 6; cosmetics) on 22 May 2008@15:01:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@06:23:36.
David Whitehead (expanded n.6) on 17 January 2014@05:26:23.

Headword: *)agaqw=n a)gaqi/des
Adler number: alpha,123
Translated headword: skeins of good things
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The proverb is used in the comic poets in reference to a lot of good things.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] 'sea of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] 'anthills of good things', in reference to an abundance of good fortune.[3]
Also [sc. attested is] 'heap of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things and a lot of good fortune.[4]
Greek Original:
*)agaqw=n a)gaqi/des: ta/ttetai h( paroimi/a para\ toi=s kwmikoi=s e)pi\ tw=n pollw=n a)gaqw=n. kai\ *)agaqw=n qa/lassa, e)pi\ plh/qous a)gaqw=n. kai\ *)agaqw=n murmhki/ai, e)pi\ plh/qous eu)daimoni/as. kai\ *)agaqw=n swro\s, e)pi\ plh/qous a)gaqw=n kai\ pollh=s eu)daimoni/as.
Notes:
The wordplay of the headword phrase a)gaqw=n a)gaqi/des is hard to render in English. 'Bundles of bounties' might do.
[1] (Same material in Photius.) Again at alpha 2601; and see also nu 77 and tau 147.
[2] Again at pi 2049.
[3] Comica adespota fr. 827 Kock, now 796 K.-A.
[4] cf. Apostolius 1.5, etc.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; ethics; imagery; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:28:16.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; minor cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@03:44:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:09:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:28:42.
David Whitehead (corrected a ref) on 16 March 2012@07:56:43.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 December 2014@04:31:45.
David Whitehead (coding) on 12 July 2015@03:58:05.

Headword: *)agaqw/nios
Adler number: alpha,125
Translated headword: Agathonios, Agathonius
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name.[1]
[The man] who was king of Tartessos.[2]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Agathon's pipe-playing": the soft and relaxed [kind]; alternatively that which is neither loose nor harsh, but temperate and very sweet.[3]
Greek Original:
*)agaqw/nios: o)/noma ku/rion. o(\s e)basi/leuse th=s *tarthssou=. kai\ *)agaqw/nios au)/lhsis: h( malakh\ kai\ e)klelume/nh: h)\ h( mh/te xalara\, mh/te pikra\, a)ll' eu)/kratos kai\ h(di/sth.
Notes:
[1] Herodotus 1.163 gives it as Arganthonios (text at web address 1). See also tau 137.
[2] In southern Spain; probably the Biblical Tarshish. See generally tau 137 and OCD(4) s.v. (p.1433).
[3] Zenobius 1.2. On Agathon (an Athenian poet of the late C5 BC) and his reputation for softness see alpha 124; and on his aulos music, M.L. West, Ancient Greek Music (Oxford 1992) 354-5.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; ethics; geography; historiography; history; imagery; meter and music; proverbs; tragedy
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:33:27.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 25 April 2002@11:17:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:14:00.
Catharine Roth (cross-reference, italics, keyword) on 18 September 2006@18:09:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:42:50.
David Whitehead on 22 December 2011@07:43:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:34:58.

Headword: *)agaqoi\ d' a)rida/krues a)/ndres
Adler number: alpha,126
Translated headword: tearful men are good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In reference to those who are strongly inclined toward pity.
Greek Original:
*)agaqoi\ d' a)rida/krues a)/ndres: e)pi\ tw=n sfo/dra pro\s e)/leon r(epo/ntwn.
Note:
Same entry in Photius, and the same or very similar ones in the paroemiographers. This version of the proverb is the second half of a line of hexameter verse (complete with the particle d'); there are slight variants in (e.g.) the scholia to Homer, Iliad 1.349.
Keywords: daily life; epic; ethics; poetry; proverbs
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:57:53.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 2 April 2001@04:49:39.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@08:02:14.
David Whitehead (augmented note; another keyword) on 22 December 2011@07:50:50.

Headword: *)agapw=
Adler number: alpha,161
Translated headword: I love, I am satisfied with
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The 'I am satisfied with' [sense] takes a dative: "Being satisfied with the good things that he already had." [1] But [sc. also used] with an accusative: "thou shalt love God with all thy soul."[2]
Greek Original:
*)agapw=: to\ a)rkou=mai dotikh=|: a)gapw=n toi=s u(pa/rxousin au)tw=| a)gaqoi=s: ai)tiatikh=| de/: a)gaph/seis to\n qeo\n e)c o(/lhs yuxh=s.
Notes:
(A marginal addition, Adler reports, in ms A.)
See also alpha 150, alpha 159, alpha 160.
[1] a)gapw=n toi=s u(parxousin a)gaqoi=s: Lysias 2.21 (web address 1) here omitting the crucial 'not' at the beginning of the phrase and adding an interpolated au)tw=|.
[2] a)gaph/seis to\n qeo/n Deuteronomy 6:5 LXX.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; religion; rhetoric
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@12:58:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation and notes, added link, keywords, set status) on 26 June 2001@13:05:31.
David Whitehead (added keyword) on 3 February 2003@07:20:41.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 26 March 2008@01:29:26.
David Whitehead (another note; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@06:41:03.
Catharine Roth (corrected betacode) on 31 March 2015@01:17:24.
David Whitehead (x-refs) on 5 April 2015@10:08:02.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:37:29.

Headword: *)aggarei/a
Adler number: alpha,162
Translated headword: compulsory labour, corvee
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Surely "of pack mules".[1]
Also [sc. attested is] a)/ggaros: [meaning] labourer, servant, porter; whence we speak of a)ggarei/a [to describe] involuntary compulsion and service brought about by force.[2]
Greek Original:
*)aggarei/a: li/an a)gga/rwn h(mio/nwn. kai\ *)/aggaros: e)rga/ths, u(phre/ths, a)xqofo/ros: o(/qen a)ggarei/an a)na/gkhn a)kou/sion le/gomen kai\ e)k bi/as ginome/nhn u(phresi/an.
Notes:
For the (unglossed) headword, again under alpha 163, see generally LSJ s.v.; and cf. alpha 164, alpha 165 alpha 166.
[1] The force of li/an is not self-evident here, but see generally LSJ s.v. (The remainder of the phrase might be a quotation, from Libanius, Oration 18.143.)
[2] Same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha94 Theodoridis.
Keywords: daily life; definition; ethics; rhetoric; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:06:05.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:26:56.
William Hutton (Cosmetics) on 28 June 2001@13:52:43.
William Hutton (Added notes) on 28 June 2001@14:04:48.
Anne Mahoney (make the Greek beta-code) on 6 July 2001@11:39:53.
David Whitehead (modified translation; cosmetics) on 11 July 2003@07:40:21.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@07:54:02.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2; tweaking) on 16 August 2013@08:28:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 31 March 2015@01:18:34.
Catharine Roth (betacode cosmeticule) on 5 April 2015@19:19:42.

Headword: *)age/neia
Adler number: alpha,197
Translated headword: low birth
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Bad birth.
Greek Original:
*)age/neia: h( dusge/neia.
Notes:
The headword literally means lack of birth. It is first attested in the Politics of Aristotle 6.1317b40 (web address 1 below) where a)ge/neia, peni/a and banausi/a are the defining characteristics, from a hostile standpoint, of democracy.
Similar entry in Hesychius, but in the accusative case and with the two nouns reversed.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: constitution; daily life; definition; ethics; philosophy; politics
Translated by: William Hutton on 17 October 2000@02:31:44.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 25 April 2002@10:02:20.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, betacode) on 26 March 2008@02:11:08.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:46:46.
David Whitehead (another note) on 29 December 2011@07:40:46.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 31 December 2011@18:20:24.

Headword: *)agenh/s
Adler number: alpha,199
Translated headword: family-less
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Isaeus [sc. uses this word] to mean a)/pais["childless"].
Greek Original:
*)agenh/s: *)isai=os a)nti\ tou= a)/pais.
Note:
Isaeus 2.1 (web address 1), cited from Harpokration s.v. In fact the transmitted texts of Isaeus have a)/pais; it is therefore likely that a)ge/nhs is an ancient variant which dropped out of the textual tradition.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: children; daily life; definition; rhetoric
Translated by: David Whitehead on 29 September 2000@06:43:03.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added link and keywords, raised status.) on 30 October 2000@20:23:54.
Catharine Roth (Cosmetic.) on 25 January 2001@18:04:11.
David Whitehead (augmented note) on 17 September 2002@05:16:40.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode) on 26 March 2008@02:12:25.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:48:14.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 20 July 2011@03:23:09.

Headword: *)/agetai
Adler number: alpha,204
Translated headword: is marrying
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[He] is courting, is taking in marriage.
Aelian [writes]: "Iobas the Maurousian is marrying his sister".[1]
Greek Original:
*)/agetai: mnhsteu/etai, e)pi\ ga/mon lamba/nei. *ai)liano/s: th\n de\ a)delfh\n au)tw=| *)io/bas o( *maurou/sios a)/getai.
Notes:
The headword, presumably extracted from the quotation given, is third person singular, present middle indicative, of a)/gw (in the sense noted by LSJ s.v., B.2).
[1] Aelian fr.60c Domingo-Forasté (57 Hercher). "Iobas the Maurousian" is more familiar to us as Juba, king of Mauretania in the second half of the C1 BCE, on whom see iota 399.
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; geography; historiography; history; women
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@12:23:24.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note; cosmetics) on 23 October 2000@06:10:38.
David Whitehead (x-ref; cosmetics) on 2 May 2004@05:47:33.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 30 December 2011@07:34:02.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 28 January 2012@19:26:37.

Headword: *)aggei/dion
Adler number: alpha,208
Translated headword: potlet
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A little pot.
Greek Original:
*)aggei/dion: to\ mikro\n a)ggei=on.
Notes:
Adler cites a comparable ('cf.') entry in the Ambrosian Lexicon.
Not a common diminutive, but see e.g. Theophrastus, Enquiry into Plants 9.6.4.
LSJ also notes an instance of this word meaning gall-bladder.
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; medicine
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@13:18:21.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead on 26 April 2002@05:08:25.
David Whitehead (added notes and more keywords) on 27 March 2006@04:48:54.
David Whitehead (another note) on 1 January 2012@06:53:15.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 25 November 2014@23:08:47.

Headword: *)agei/ras
Adler number: alpha,210
Translated headword: cripple, beggar
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A lame man.
Greek Original:
*)agei/ras: o( xwlo/s.
Note:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon -- and generated (as she notes) by Josephus, Jewish War 5.474, where this headword appears (spelled with i, not ei: agiras) and is given precisely this gloss. (Perhaps a nomen agentis from a)gei/rw in the sense of "collect alms, beg"?)
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@13:34:58.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented and modified note; added keyword) on 26 April 2002@05:21:15.
David Whitehead (expanded note; more keywords; cosmetics) on 2 January 2012@09:39:21.

Headword: *)agkw/n
Adler number: alpha,249
Translated headword: elbow
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"In the royal palace of Gelimer was a building full of darkness, which the Carthaginians used to call [the] Elbow; therein were thrown all toward whom the tyrant was ill-disposed. There, in the time of Belisarius, happened to be confined many traders from the east about to be destroyed by the tyrant at that time, whom the guard of the prison released."[1]
"And he placed the siege-engines in the way that seemed most timely, and he hit both the wall-angles [angkones] and the trenches from both sides."[2]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gkw=nes, a certain part of the house.[3]
Another meaning of a)gkw=nes is everything that, in a dream, fixes the well-ordered aspect of life.[4]
*)agkw=nes [are] also the prominences of rivers, the ones at the banks.
"It was not possible to sail through to the stream ahead because of the size of the descending prominences which it was necessary for those dragging the ships to bend round."[5]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gkw=nes, [in the sense of] the heights of the mountains. "Some of you seek out the [western] heights, and some the eastern, going toward the evil exit of the man."[6]
And [there is] a proverbial expression: wiping one's nose with the elbow.[7]
Bion the philosopher said: "my father was a freed slave, wiping his nose with his elbow;" it indicated clearly the saltfish-importer.[8]
See another proverbial expression, 'sweet bend' [in a river, etc.].[9]
Greek Original:
*)agkw/n: e)n th=| basilikh=| au)lh=| tou= *geli/meros oi)/khma h)=n sko/tous a)na/plewn, o(\ dh\ *)agkw=na e)ka/loun oi( *karxhdo/nioi: e)/nqa e)neba/llonto a(/pantes oi(=s a)\n xalepai/noi o( tu/rannos. e)ntau=qa e)pi\ *belisari/ou polloi\ kaqeirgme/noi e)tu/gxanon tw=n e(w/|wn e)mpo/rwn, ou(\s me/llontas kat' e)kei=no kairou= a)nairei=sqai u(po\ tou= tura/nnou o( fu/lac tou= desmwthri/ou a)pe/luse. kai\ dieti/qei ta\s mhxana\s h(=| ma/lista e)do/kei kai/rion, a)gkw=nas te kai\ ta/frous e)ba/leto e(kate/rwqen. kai\ *)agkw=nes, me/ros ti th=s oi)ki/as. a)gkw=nes de\ kai\ pa/nta ta\ prosphsso/mena kat' o)/nar to\ ko/smion tou= bi/ou shmai/nei. *)agkw=nes kai\ ai( tw=n potamw=n e)coxai\, ai( para\ tai=s o)/xqais. ou) dunato\n h)=n pro\s a)nti/on to\n r(ou=n a)naplei=n dia\ to\ me/geqos tw=n prospipto/ntwn a)gkw/nwn, ou(\s e)/dei ka/mptein pare/lkontas ta\s nau=s. kai\ *)agkw=nas, ta\s a)/kras tw=n o)rw=n. oi( de\ spei/rousin a)gkw=nas, oi( d' a)nthli/ous zhtei=t' i)o/ntes t' a)ndro\s e)/codon kakh/n. kai\ paroimi/a: tw=| a)gkw=ni a)pomusso/menos. *bi/wn fhsi\n o( filo/sofos: e)mou= o( path\r me\n h)=n a)peleu/qeros, tw=| a)gkw=ni a)pomusso/menos: diedh/lou de\ to\n tarixe/mporon. zh/tei kai\ a)/llhn paroimi/an, to\ gluku\s a)gkw/n.
Notes:
[1] An abridgement of Procopius, History of the Wars of Justinian 3.20.4-7.
[2] From an unidentifiable military narrative. (For the headword in this sense see LSJ s.v., II.)
[3] For this gloss, cf. iota 552.
[4] Artemidorus 1.74; cf. omicron 349.
[5] Quotation unidentifiable.
[6] Sophocles, Ajax 805-6 (web address 1); the first adjective is garbled here.
[7] cf. Mantissa Proverbiorum 3.31 and the quotation which follows here.
[8] Diogenes Laertius 4.46.
[9] gamma 316.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: architecture; biography; chronology; daily life; dreams; economics; ethics; food; geography; historiography; history; imagery; military affairs; philosophy; proverbs; science and technology; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg on 24 November 1998@13:57:02.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (supplied headword; added notes; augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@04:02:29.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@08:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 20 November 2005@10:40:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 February 2011@08:38:56.
Catharine Roth (tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 February 2011@01:08:42.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@05:46:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 30 December 2014@00:14:19.

Headword: *)agnapto/tatos ba/tos au)=os
Adler number: alpha,273
Translated headword: stiffest dried skate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. A proverbial phrase] in reference to one who is harsh and obstinate by temperament.
Greek Original:
*)agnapto/tatos ba/tos au)=os: e)pi\ tou= sklhrou= kai\ au)qa/dous to\n tro/pon.
Note:
For discussion see alpha 340, where the entry is repeated (in correct alphabetical context).
Keywords: daily life; ethics; food; imagery; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: Roger Travis on 6 October 2000@12:59:16.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set status) on 18 June 2001@02:18:24.
David Whitehead (modified headword, translation, note) on 18 June 2001@04:40:42.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 5 January 2012@04:57:59.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@08:33:55.

Headword: *)agnoei= d' a)ra/xnh pai=das w(s paideu/etai
Adler number: alpha,277
Translated headword: a spider knows not how she educates her children.
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[A spider knows not how she educates her children.] For having nurtured them she has died at the hands of her dearest ones. [Sc. A proverbial saying] in reference to those who look after something against their own interest.
Greek Original:
*)agnoei= d' a)ra/xnh pai=das w(s paideu/etai. qre/yasa ga\r te/qnhke pro\s tw=n filta/twn: e)pi\ tw=n kaq' e(autw=n ti pragmateuome/nwn.
Note:
cf. Diogenianus 1.70 and other paroemiographers
Keywords: children; daily life; ethics; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: Roger Travis on 6 October 2000@13:05:58.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@05:56:55.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 16 November 2005@07:50:46.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 5 January 2012@05:07:34.

Headword: *(agno/teros phdali/ou
Adler number: alpha,281
Translated headword: purer than a steering-oar
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. A proverbial phrase] in reference to those who have lived pure lives; to the extent that the steering-oar is always in the sea.
Greek Original:
*(agno/teros phdali/ou: e)pi\ tw=n a(gnw=s bebiwko/twn: par' o(/son e)n qala/tth| dia\ panto/s e)sti to\ phda/lion.
Notes:
Diogenianus 1.11 and other paroemiographers.
Presumably this proverb's effect turns on the purificatory properties of salt.
On the steering oars -- always in pairs -- of ancient ships, see pi 1493 and pi 1494, and generally Lionel Casson, Ships and Seamanship in the Ancient World (Baltimore & London 1971) 224-8.
Keywords: daily life; ethics; proverbs; science and technology
Translated by: Roger Travis on 23 October 2000@13:17:56.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keywords; cosmetics) on 12 February 2001@07:10:49.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@07:24:45.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@08:40:55.

Headword: *)agnu/qes
Adler number: alpha,289
Translated headword: loom-weights
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the stones of the loom.
Greek Original:
*)agnu/qes: oi( li/qoi tou= i(stou=.
Notes:
Same or similar entry in some other lexica and grammars, though with the accentuation a)gnu=qes . The word does not seem to have an Indo-European etymology, and Chantraine s.v. suggests that it may be borrowed.
LSJ entry at web address 1.
References:
OCD(4) pp.1446-7 (s.v. "textile production", by J.P. Wild)
P. Chantraine, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque, ed. 2, Paris 2009
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: clothing; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; science and technology
Translated by: Catharine Roth on 26 February 2001@00:45:26.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added bibliography and keyword) on 26 February 2001@03:10:55.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@08:09:41.
Catharine Roth (expanded note) on 5 January 2012@19:23:13.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:41:33.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 July 2014@02:53:24.
Catharine Roth (added bibliography) on 4 August 2014@22:42:42.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 4 August 2014@22:44:38.

Find      

Test Database Real Database

(Try these tips for more productive searches.)

You might also want to look for daily life in other resources.
No. of records found: 4116    Page 1