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Headword: Abel
Adler number: alpha,30
Translated headword: Abel
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Son of Adam.[1] This man was chaste and just from the beginning and a shepherd of flocks; out of these he offered a sacrifice to God and was accepted, but was then killed because he was envied by his brother Cain.[2] Cain happened to be a farmer and after the judgement he lived worse, with groaning and trembling. For Abel, by dedicating the firstborn [of the flock] to God, recommended himself as more God-loving than self-loving,[3] and because this was a good choice, he was accepted. But Cain impiously kept his first-fruits for himself and gave the seconds to God, and for this reason was rightly rejected. For it says: "and after some days it happened that Cain offered from the fruits of the earth."[4] Cain was disgraced by the fact that the produce he offered was not the first-fruits but that which was some days old and second-best.
Greek Original:
Abel: huios Adam. houtos parthenos kai dikaios hupêrche kai poimên probatôn: ex hôn kai thusian tôi theôi prosagagôn kai dechtheis anaireitai, phthonêtheis hupo tou adelphou autou Kaïn. ho Kaïn de geôrgos tunchanôn kai meta tên dikên cheironôs biôsas stenôn kai tremôn ên. ho gar Abel ta prôtotoka tôi theôi kathierôn philotheon mallon ê philauton heauton sunistê, hothen kai dia tês agathês autou proaireseôs apedechthê. ho de Kaïn dussebôs heautôi aponemôn ta prôtogennêmata, theôi de ta deutera, eikotôs kai apeblêthê. phêsi gar: kai egeneto meth' hêmeras, prosênenke Kaïn apo tôn karpôn tês gês. hôste dia touto Kaïn elenchetai, hoti mê ta akrothinia gennêmata prosênenke tôi theôi, alla ta meth' hêmeras kai deutera.
Notes:
George the Monk, Chronicon 6.10-7.16.
[1] alpha 425.
[2] kappa 27.
[3] Again at sigma 1580.
[4] Genesis 4:3.
Keywords: agriculture; biography; botany; Christianity; daily life; ethics; food; historiography; religion; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:57:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, keywords, set status) on 27 January 2001@12:23:00.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 27 February 2003@08:28:31.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 8 September 2003@06:15:32.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 October 2005@10:57:50.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics; raised status) on 22 June 2011@07:14:12.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 29 August 2012@10:24:09.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@01:03:34.

Headword: Ablêchrên
Adler number: alpha,58
Translated headword: feeble
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] weak. For what is strong [is] blhxro/n.[1]
Aelian [writes]: "so she brought her life to an end gently and with a calm and feeble death, such as even Homer seems to me to praise."[2]
Greek Original:
Ablêchrên: asthenê. blêchron gar to ischuron. Ailianos: katestrepsen oun ton bion praôs te kai sun galênêi kai ablêchrôi thanatôi, honper oun epainein kai Homêros dokei moi.
Notes:
The headword adjective is feminine accusative singular. It is extracted from Homer, Iliad 5.337, where it refers to Aphrodite's hand; cf. the scholia there.
[1] Same or similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha42 Theodoridis); and cf. beta 340. This seems to be an error, however: blhxro/s is well attested as meaning "weak" by itself: see web address 1 for the LSJ entry. The lexica mistake the copulative alpha in the headword for an alpha privative.
[2] Aelian fr. 182d Domingo-Forasté (179 Hercher): cf. Homer, Odyssey 11.135 (web address 2 below). The preceding fragment, quoted at tau 596, shows that the subject is a woman.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; poetry; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:09:47.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation and notes, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@08:53:17.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 4 September 2001@23:32:57.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 June 2003@08:00:49.
David Whitehead (typo) on 17 July 2003@03:43:18.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@17:16:29.
David Whitehead (added primary note and more keywords; tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:20:09.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link and reference) on 28 January 2012@18:52:16.
Catharine Roth (tweaks, cross-reference, keyword) on 14 October 2012@01:44:40.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:49:04.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:03:02.

Headword: Abra
Adler number: alpha,68
Translated headword: favorite
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Not simply a maidservant nor even the pretty maidservant is called [favorite], but a daughter of one of the house slaves and an honored one, whether born in the house or not. Menander in False Heracles [writes]: "the mother of these two sisters is dead. A concubine of their father's, who used to be their mother's favorite slave, is bringing them up."[1] In Sikyonian: "he bought a beloved slave instead and did not hand the slave over to his wife, but kept her apart, as is appropriate for a free woman."[2] In Faithless One: "I thought if the old man got the gold, he'd get himself a favorite slave right away."[3]
Iamblichus [writes]: "since this was difficult and something of a rarity, with the [woman] housekeeper on guard and another favorite slave-woman also present, he persuades the daughter to run away without her parents' knowledge."[4]
Greek Original:
Abra: oute haplôs therapaina oute hê eumorphos therapaina legetai, all' oikotrips gunaikos korê kai entimos, eite oikogenês eite mê. Menandros Pseudêraklei: mêtêr tethnêke tain adelphain tain duein tautain. trephei de pallakê tis tou patros autas, abra tês mêtros autôn genomenê. Sikuôniôi: kai abran gar antônoumenos erômenên, tautêi men ou paredôk' echein, trephein de chôris, hôs eleutherai prepei. Apistôi: ômên ei to chrusion laboi ho gerôn, therapainan euthus êgorasmenên abran esesthai. Iamblichos: epei de touto chalepon ên kai spanion ti to tês oikourou phulattousês kai abras tinos allês sumparousês, anapeithei tên korên lathousan tous goneis apodranai.
Notes:
The main part of this entry is also in Photius, Lexicon alpha50 Theodoridis (where the headword is plural); similar material in other lexica.
LSJ uses the rough breathing (a(/bra) for the word it defines specifically as 'favorite slave'. See web address 1 below.
[1] Menander fr. 520 Kock, 453 K.-Th., 411 K.-A.
[2] Menander fr. 438 Kock (1 Sandbach).
[3] Menander fr. 64 Kock, 58 K.-Th., 63 K.-A.
[4] Iamblichus, Babyloniaca fr. 56 Habrich.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; gender and sexuality; philosophy; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:13:15.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:59:03.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added link) on 30 January 2001@23:04:27.
David Whitehead (added keyword) on 31 January 2001@04:33:38.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 24 April 2002@03:20:49.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 15 August 2007@10:03:18.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:26:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:03:54.
David Whitehead (updated refs) on 16 August 2013@07:04:59.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@03:49:04.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@06:54:57.

Headword: Habrais
Adler number: alpha,73
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] gentle, dainty.[1] Aelian [writes]: "them placing [half-beams] upon very delicate couches and mattresses adorned with some magnificent weaving."[2]
Greek Original:
Habrais: hapalais, trupherais. Ailianos: epi klinais mala habrais kai strômnais huphei tini huperêphanôi kekosmêmenais epithentas.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 70.
[1] The headword is dative plural of this adjective, presumably extracted from the quotation given.
[2] A truncated version of Aelian fr. 53h Domingo-Forasté (50 Hercher); more fully at delta 75, and see also upsilon 290.
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:29:17.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added keyword, set status) on 31 January 2001@13:01:14.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 1 February 2001@03:53:15.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:25:52.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 28 January 2012@18:56:48.
David Whitehead (another x-ref; cosmetics) on 17 January 2014@04:28:35.

Headword: Abrixai
Adler number: alpha,79
Translated headword: to drop off, to nod off
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to be drowsy after eating[1] or to fall asleep.
Greek Original:
Abrixai: to apo boras nustaxai ê koimêthênai.
Notes:
Likewise in ps.-Zonaras. The headword, presumably quoted from somewhere, is an aorist active infinitive. LSJ proffers no suitable verb for it under alpha, but see the entry on bri/zw, 'to be sleepy, nod'. (Adler notes that after beta 542 ms F has the entry Bri/zw: to\ nusta/zw.)
[1] This much also occurs, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon.
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:33:30.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set keywords and status) on 31 January 2001@13:22:44.
David Whitehead (modified headword; added note) on 27 February 2003@08:52:09.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@09:53:30.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note) on 2 April 2015@10:50:15.

Headword: Habrodiaitêi
Adler number: alpha,82
Translated headword: with luxurious living
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] with a soft and dainty life.[1] Also [sc. attested is the related adjective] habrodiaitos: a softy, a soft-liver.[2]
"The lifestyle of the Romans [is] not inclined toward soft-living, especially since they are warlike and hard working."[3]
It also means someone living in affluence.
Also [sc. attested is] a(bro/thti ["in luxury"]: [meaning] in softness, in daintiness.[4]
Greek Original:
Habrodiaitêi: trupherai zôêi kai hapalêi. kai Habrodiaitos: truphêtês, trupherobios. tois de Rhômaiois ouk es to habrodiaiton ho bios: allôs de hôs philopolemoi te eisi kai phereponoi. sêmainei de kai ton plousiôs zônta. kai Habrotêti: trupherotêti, hapalotêti.
Notes:
[1] The primary headword -- a single word in the Greek (but described in LSJ s.v. as 'a faulty compound') -- and its glossing phrase are transmitted in the dative case here, but at Photius, Lexicon alpha52 Theodoridis, the editor prints them as nominatives.
[2] Same or similar material in other lexica.
[3] Menander Protector fr. 15.1 Blockley.
[4] Same material in other lexica; references at Photius alpha58 Theodoridis.
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; ethics; historiography; military affairs
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:35:47.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered translation, set keywords and status) on 31 January 2001@23:01:03.
David Whitehead (modified note; cosmetics) on 1 February 2001@04:17:21.
David Whitehead (supplemented translation; augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 December 2011@04:06:41.
David Whitehead on 20 December 2011@04:07:24.
David Whitehead (updated a reference) on 3 January 2012@04:22:20.
David Whitehead (tweaked notes) on 16 August 2013@07:16:19.

Headword: Habron
Adler number: alpha,86
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In Herodotus [sc. this means something] beautiful, stubborn, awe-inspiring, dainty.
Greek Original:
Habron: para Hêrodotôi kalon, authades, semnon, trupheron.
Note:
The headword adjective is neuter nominative (and accusative) singular of alpha 87 (and cf. alpha 88), extracted here from Herodotus 1.71.4 (web address 1), and accompanied by ancient glosses on that passage. In fact, 'luxurious' or 'soft-living' would be more appropriate; cf. a(bro/tatoi in 4.104 (web address 2), and Powell s.v.
Reference:
J.E. Powell, A Lexicon to Herodotus. Hildesheim: George Olms 1977
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:38:32.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, augmented note, added bibliography and keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@09:51:15.
William Hutton (Modified my own note, added links) on 1 February 2001@14:00:33.
David Whitehead (modified note; cosmetics) on 5 February 2003@09:50:33.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 December 2011@09:37:09.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 21 December 2011@01:53:17.

Headword: Habros
Adler number: alpha,87
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] bright, delicate, tender.[1]
In the Epigrams: "a cicada sat above a cithara delicately murmuring."[2]
"All the same that fellow is dainty and delicate and weakened by the softness of his body and depraved and with his hair done up like the most licentious little courtesans. And when he goes in to see the king his face and his curly hair are always delicately dripping [with perfume], and he takes as much money from the communal difficulties as would satisfy even the legendary Midas."[3]
Greek Original:
Habros: lampros, trupheros, hapalos. en Epigrammasin: habron epitruzôn kitharas huper hezeto tettix. homôs de ho trupheros ekeinos kai habros kai hupo malakias tou sômatos kateagôs kai lelugismenos kai tas te komas anadoumenos, hôsper hai tôn hetairidôn aselgesterai, kai habrostages echôn aei to metôpon kai tous bostruchous, labôn chrusion ek tôn koinôn sumphorôn, hoson hikanon ên emplêsai kai ton ek tou muthou Midan, eiserrei pros ton basilea.
Notes:
For this adjective see already alpha alpha 73 and alpha 86, and again alpha 88.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha55 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.54.7 (Paulus Silentarius).
[3] Attributed by Hemsterhuys to Eunapius; again (in part) at alpha 1860.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; imagery; mythology; poetry; women; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:39:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@12:21:50.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:35:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 January 2006@10:26:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@04:35:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 December 2011@19:16:16.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:18:56.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:31:02.

Headword: Habros leimôn kai noteros kai euthalês
Adler number: alpha,88
Translated headword: a meadow delicate and moist and flourishing
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"All decked out as luxuriously as possible and in a manner that was amazing in terms of wealth, for someone, that is, who marvels at wealth."
Greek Original:
Habros leimôn kai noteros kai euthalês. pantas de hôs habrotata te kai hama es ekplêxin kata plouton, tôi ge dê plouton thaumazonti, estalmenous.
Notes:
The precise relationship between the headword phrase -- a re-arranged version of part of Aelian fr. 126a Domingo-Forasté (123 Hercher), quoted in epsilon 3095 -- and the quotation which serves as its gloss is unclear, though the latter too has been suggested as coming from Aelian: so Adler at epsilon 3200. Adler regards the quotation here (lacking in ms S) as an interpolation from epsilon 3200.
The manuscripts and Photius read kaino/teros "newer"; Markland (Jeremiah Markland, 1693–1776) emended to kai\ notero\s by comparison with epsilon 3095.
Keywords: daily life; economics; ethics; geography; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:40:06.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@14:37:55.
David Whitehead (modified note; cosmetics) on 4 February 2001@06:10:47.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 December 2005@08:32:15.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 28 April 2008@16:20:12.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 29 April 2008@11:53:20.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 21 December 2011@04:38:24.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 28 January 2012@19:07:49.

Headword: Habrosunê
Adler number: alpha,89
Translated headword: splendor
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] brightness.
Greek Original:
Habrosunê: phaidrotês.
Notes:
The rare headword noun (also in other lexica, with the same gloss) is a poetic variant of a(bro/ths; see LSJ s.v. Though it is attested in Sappho and elsewhere, its inclusion here seems to have been prompted by its occurrence in Euripides, Orestes 349 (so Latte on Hesychius s.v.); cf. the scholia there.
cf. generally alpha 86, alpha 87, alpha 88. For the glossing noun see also the gloss at pi 138.
Keywords: daily life; definition; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:40:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, cosmetics, set keywords & status) on 1 February 2001@21:30:02.
David Whitehead (x-refs) on 3 January 2005@10:39:54.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords) on 21 December 2011@04:44:38.
David Whitehead (tweaked note) on 1 February 2012@05:40:54.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 4 April 2015@08:08:49.

Headword: Habrochitôn
Adler number: alpha,96
Translated headword: delicate-tunic'd
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] wearing delicate things.
Greek Original:
Habrochitôn: truphera phorôn.
Note:
Same entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha60 Theodoridis. The headword adjective bears this meaning in e.g. Greek Anthology 9.538; however, the word is first attested in Aeschylus, Persians 543, of beds (accusative plural: web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: clothing; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:45:35.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, set keywords and status) on 1 February 2001@22:44:01.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 27 February 2003@09:00:26.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, title tags) on 25 March 2008@12:02:09.
David Whitehead (expanded note; tweaks) on 21 December 2011@06:35:49.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:27:25.

Headword: Abrôn
Adler number: alpha,97
Translated headword: Abron, Habron
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Phrygian or Rhodian, grammarian, student of Tryphon,[1] sophist at Rome, the offspring of slaves, according to Hermippus.[2]
Greek Original:
Abrôn: Phrux ê Rhodios, grammatikos, mathêtês Truphônos, sophisteusas en Rhômêi, gegonôs de ek doulôn, hôs phêsin Hermippos.
Notes:
Presumably Habron (the aspirated version of the name is the more authentic), RE 8.2155 #4 (and OCD(4) s.v.), author of a treatise On the Pronoun in the C1 CE.
[1] Tryphon: tau 1115.
[2] For Hermippus see epsilon 3045. This is his fr. 73 FHG (3.52).
Reference:
R. Berndt, 'Die Fragmente des Grammatikers Habron', Berliner philologioscher Wochenschrift 35 (1915) 1452-1455, 1483
Keywords: biography; daily life; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; philosophy; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:46:35.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@22:49:38.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and bibliography) on 2 February 2001@03:41:19.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, cross-reference) on 9 December 2009@17:25:23.
David Whitehead (added bibligraphy and another keyword) on 21 December 2011@06:41:35.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 17 January 2014@04:59:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:16:02.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:50:39.

Headword: Abrônos bios
Adler number: alpha,98
Translated headword: Abron's life
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. A proverbial phrase] In reference to those who live extravagantly; for Abron became rich among the Argives. Or also from the [adjective] habros ["delicate"].[1]
Also [sc. attested is the adjective] Abroneios ["Abronian"].[2]
Greek Original:
Abrônos bios: epi tôn polutelôn: Abrôn gar par' Argeiois egeneto plousios. ê kai apo tou habrou. kai Abrôneios.
Notes:
[1] cf. Zenobius 1.4.
[2] Attested here only.
Keywords: aetiology; biography; daily life; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; ethics; geography; proverbs
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:47:19.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added keyword, set status) on 1 February 2001@22:55:06.
David Whitehead (added notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 24 April 2002@03:46:57.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 21 December 2011@06:44:57.

Headword: Abudos
Adler number: alpha,101
Translated headword: Abudos, Abydos, Abydus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A city.[1]
The word is applied to an informant [sukofa/nths] because of the common belief that the people of Abudos were informers.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] an adverb, *)abudo/qi, [meaning] in Abudos.[3]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] *a)/budon fluari/an ["Abudos nonsense"], [meaning] great [nonsense].[4]
And [sc. attested is] *)abudhno\s, [meaning] he [who comes] from Abudos.[5]
Greek Original:
Abudos: polis. epi sukophantou tattetai hê lexis, dia to dokein sukophantas einai tous Abudênous. kai epirrêma, Abudothi, en Abudôi. kai Abudon phluarian, tên pollên. kai Abudênos, ho apo Abudou.
Notes:
[1] = Lexicon Ambrosianum 82, according to Adler. In fact two cities of this name are known: one on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid G4; present-day Maltepe) and Abydos/Ebot in Upper Egypt (Barrington Atlas map 77 grid F4); without much doubt, the former is meant here. (In Hesychius alpha23 the gloss is fuller -- 'a Trojan city of the Hellespont'. Latte regards the entry as prompted by Homer, Iliad 2.836, accusative case, although similar wording appears in a late scholion to Iliad 17.584, where the adverbial derivative a)budo/qi appears -- see n. 3 below). See also alpha 100, sigma 465, and generally OCD(4) s.v.
[2] = the first sentence of Pausanias the Atticist alpha3 and Photius alpha63 Theodoridis; cf. also Zenobius 1.1, s.v. *)abudhno\n e)pifo/rhma (alpha 100), and Kassel-Austin, PCG III.2 p.376 on Aristophanes fr. 755. See generally sigma 1330, sigma 1331, sigma 1332.
[3] Probably from commentary to Homer, Iliad 17.584, the only literary attestation of this adverb prior to Musaeus Grammaticus (5/6 CE); cf. Apollonius Dyscolus On Adverbs 2.1.1.164.
[4] = Synagoge Codex B alpha44, but in the better mss of Photius (Lexicon alpha64 Theodoridis) the adjective (in a nominative-case entry) is a)/buqos ('bottomless'), surely correctly; cf. alpha 104. The ultimate source may be Plato, Parmenides 130D, though there too the text is uncertain: perhaps ei)/s tin' a)/buqon fluari/an (web address 1), though the alternatives include ei)/s tina bu=qon fluari/as. On the adjective a)/buqos, a synonym for a)/bussos, see the LSJ entry at web address 2.
[5] There are many literary attestations of this form of the ethnic adjective (nominative singular masculine), beginning with Herodotus 4.138. For an instance in the Suda see pi 71.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; geography; law; philosophy; proverbs
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@13:59:06.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@21:07:09.
Ross Scaife ✝ (fixed keywords) on 2 March 2000@17:48:48.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; replaced existing note; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:05:35.
Jennifer Benedict (added links, betacode fix, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:03:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 18 April 2011@14:40:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 25 April 2011@04:09:51.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@09:19:59.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1) on 1 February 2012@05:52:37.
David Whitehead (expansions to notes) on 16 August 2013@07:33:01.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 4 July 2014@08:19:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:21:46.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:35:15.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 22 December 2014@09:26:49.

Headword: Agatha
Adler number: alpha,108
Translated headword: goods, goodies
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Xenophon used the word of foodstuffs and drinks which bring enjoyment and good cheer.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Good Things Kilikon" - with "has" omitted. Kilikon [is] a proper name. He was wealthy.[2]
Greek Original:
Agatha: epi tôn pros apolausin kai euôchian sitiôn kai potôn echrêsato Xenophôn têi lexei. kai Agatha Kilikôn, leipei to echei. Kilikôn de onoma kurion. euporos de ên.
Notes:
[1] Xenophon, Anabasis 4.4.9 (web address 1 below).
[2] This is only one possible explanation of the proverbial phrase. For another, probably better one - with another version of the name (Killikon: apparently authentic, as it derives from Aristophanes, Peace 363 [web address 2 below]) - see kappa 1610; but note also kappa 223 and pi 2040 on "Kallikon".
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: aetiology; biography; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; food; historiography; proverbs
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:14:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added links, set status) on 8 June 2001@01:15:16.
David Whitehead (added keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:00:27.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:19:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:18:17.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 22 December 2011@03:59:55.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 23 December 2011@18:41:14.

Headword: Agathê kai maza met' arton
Adler number: alpha,110
Translated headword: after bread a barley cake is good too
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In reference to those who give or take second-best.[1]
*ma/za [barley cake] has an acute [accent]; for a circumflex does not occur before the position of a long vowel.[2] Aristophanes, though, gives ma/za a circumflex: "bring, bring a barley cake for the dung-beetle as quick as you can."[3]
Greek Original:
Agathê kai maza met' arton: epi tôn ta deutereia didontôn ê hairoumenôn. maza oxeian echei: epanô gar thesei makras perispômenê ou tithetai: ho de Aristophanês perispa tên mazan: air' aire mazan hôs tachista kantharôi.
Notes:
All except the first sentence of this entry is reported by Adler as a marginal gloss in manuscripts A (= Parisinus 2625) and M (= Marcianus 448).
[1] cf. Zenobius 1.12.
[2] Yet in classical Attic, the final syllable is short, so the first syllable can have a circumflex: ma=za. See LSJ (web address 1).
[3] Aristophanes, Peace 1 (web address 2); again at alphaiota 280 and alphaiota 299. In the Aristophanes passage the word is not actually used for cakes of barley but for cakes of dung.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 30 March 2001@14:33:31.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; minor cosmetics) on 31 March 2001@03:05:31.
William Hutton (Augmented note) on 31 March 2001@08:40:31.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:25:33.
David Whitehead (modified end of translation; augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:28:04.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, status) on 4 July 2011@19:14:38.

Headword: Agathoklês
Adler number: alpha,117
Translated headword: Agathokles, Agathocles
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This man became tyrant [of Syracuse] and, as Timaeus says, in his early youth was a common prostitute, ready [to give himself] to the most debauched, a jackdaw, a buzzard,[1] presenting his backside to all who wanted it. When he died, says [Timaeus], his wife cried out to him in lamentation, "What [did] I not [carnally do to] you? And what [did] you not [reciprocate to] me?"[2] That nature had endowed Agathokles with great advantages is clear. For escaping the wheel, the smoke[of the kiln and] the clay,[3] he came to Syracuse, at about the age of eighteen, and in a short time, starting from such beginnings, he became master of the whole of Sicily, exposed the Carthaginians to extreme dangers, and finally, having grown old in the role of dynast, ended his life with the title of king.[4]
Greek Original:
Agathoklês: houtos egeneto turannos kai, hôs phêsi Timaios, kata tên prôtên hêlikian koinos pornos, hetoimos tois akratestatois, koloios, triorchês, pantôn tôn boulomenôn tois opisthen emprosthen gegonôs. hos hote apethane, tên gunaika phêsi kataklaiomenên auton houtô thrênein: ti d' ouk egô se; ti d' ouk eme su; hoti de ek phuseôs anankê megala proterêmata gegonenai peri ton Agathoklea, touto dêlon. eis gar tas Surakousas paregenêthê pheugôn ton trochon, ton kapnon, ton pêlon, peri te tên hêlikian oktôkaideka etê gegonôs, kai meta tina chronon hormêtheis hupo toiautês hupotheseôs, kurios men egenêthê pasês Sikelias, megistois de kindunois periestêse Karchêdonious, telos engêrasas têi dunasteiai, katestrepse ton bion basileus prosagoreuomenos.
Notes:
360-289 BCE; he ruled Syracuse from 317-289. See generally OCD(4) p.36, under Agathocles(1).
The entry presents a semi-verbatim and mildly abridged extract from Polybius (12.15.2-7: web address 1 below), who is in turn citing, disapprovingly, Timaeus of Tauromenium (FGrH 566 F124b).
[1] On this passage K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality (London 1978) p.103 writes: 'The jackdaw here probably sybolises impudence and shamelessness; the buzzard, in Greek triorkhes, having three testicles, presumably symbolises insatiable lust, which is assumed to characterise the true pornos'. Cf. tau 995, where the first part of this quotation reappears.
[2] Probably Theoxene, the daughter or stepdaughter of Ptolemy I Soter and the third wife of Agathokles. See F.W. Walbank, A historical commentary on Polybius (Oxford, 1967) v.2 p.361.
[3] His father owned a large pottery. See Diodorus 19.2.7; 20.63.4. As with equivalent figures in (e.g.) late-C5 Athens, such as Kleon, we see here the conceit that those whose wealth lay in manufacture would actually participate in (and be debased by) the actual manufacturing.
[4] Agathokles assumed the title of king in 305. See Diodorus 20.54.1.
References:
Berve, H., Die Herrschaft des Agathokles (Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1953)
Agathokles(15) in RE 1.1 748-757
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; constitution; daily life; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; history; politics; trade and manufacture; women; zoology
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@10:07:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 6 June 2001@00:10:30.
Tony Natoli (Modified translation, added notes and bibliography, raised status.) on 12 August 2001@02:19:21.
David Whitehead (restorative and other cosmetics) on 17 September 2002@05:10:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@10:59:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 20 November 2005@10:37:08.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:30:36.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:16:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:23:59.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:51:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 17 February 2018@23:14:40.

Headword: Agathon
Adler number: alpha,118
Translated headword: good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In general [it is] something beneficial, but in particular what is either identical with or not different from benefit; hence, both virtue itself and what participates in it are called "good" in three ways: as the good (i) from which [being benefited] results, [and (ii) according to which being benefited results,] as [virtuous] action and virtue,[1] and (iii) by whom [being benefited results], as the virtuous person who participates in virtue. Or [they define it [2]] in this fashion: the good is the perfection in accordance with nature of a rational being qua rational. And virtue is a thing of this sort, so that virtuous action as well as virtuous people participate [in the good]. Joy, cheerfulness and the like are byproducts [of virtue]. Furthermore, of goods, some are in the soul, others external, and others neither in the soul nor external. The ones in the soul are virtues and actions in accordance with them. The external ones are a virtuous fatherland, a virtuous friend, and their happiness. Those which are neither external nor in the soul are someone's being for himself virtuous and happy. Furthermore, of goods, some are final, others instrumental, and others both final and instrumental. Thus a friend and the benefits added by him are instrumental goods. But confidence, prudence, freedom, enjoyment, cheerfulness, freedom from distress, and every action in accordance with virtue are final. [Virtues] are instrumental and final: they are instrumental goods insofar as they produce happiness, and final [goods] insofar as they complete it in such a way as to become parts of it; for example a friend and freedom and enjoyment.[3] Furthermore, of the goods in the soul, some are conditions, others dispositions, and others neither conditions nor dispositions. Virtues are dispositions, pursuits conditions, and activities neither conditions nor dispositions. In general good children and a good old age are minor goods,[4] but knowledge is a simple good. And virtues are always present, but joy and taking a stroll for example not always. Every good is profitable, advantageous, binding, useful, serviceable, fine, beneficial, just, and choiceworthy.
That which is aimed at by all things is good.[5]
Thus that to which all things are referred but which is referred to nothing is good.[6]
Greek Original:
Agathon: koinôs men to ti ophelos, idiôs de êtoi tauton ê ouch heteron ôpheleias: hothen autên te tên aretên kai to metechon autês agathon trichôs legesthai. hoion to agathon, aph' hou sumbainei, hôs tên praxin kai tên aretên. huph' hou de, hôs ton spoudaion ton metechonta tês aretês. ê houtôs: to agathon, to teleion kata phusin logikou, ê hôs logikou. toiouto d' einai tên aretên hôs metechonta tas te praxeis tas kat' aretên, kai to spoudaious einai. epigennêmata de tên te charan kai tên euphrosunên kai ta paraplêsia. eti tôn agathôn ta men einai peri psuchên, ta de ektos, ta de oute peri psuchên oute ektos. ta men peri psuchên aretas kai tas kata tautas praxeis: ta de ektos to te spoudaian echein patrida kai spoudaion philon kai tên toutôn eudaimonian. ta de ouk ektos oute peri psuchên to auton heautôi einai spoudaion kai eudaimona. eti tôn agathôn ta men einai telika, ta de poiêtika, ta de telika kai poiêtika. ton men oun philon kai tas hup' autou prosginomenas ôpheleias poiêtika einai agatha: tharsos de kai phronêma kai eleutherian kai terpsin kai euphrosunên kai alupian kai pasan tên kat' aretên praxin telika. poiêtika de kai telika, katho men poiousi tên eudaimonian, poiêtika estin agatha: katho de sumplêrousin autên, hôste merê autês genesthai, telika: hoion philos kai eleutheria kai terpsis. eti tôn peri psuchên agathôn ta men eisin hexeis, ta de diatheseis, ta de oute hexeis oute diatheseis. diatheseis men hai aretai, hexeis de ta epitêdeumata, oute de hexeis oute diatheseis hai energeiai. koinôs tôn agathôn mikra men estin euteknia kai eugêria. haploun de estin agathon epistêmê. kai aei men paronta hai aretai, ouk aei de hoion chara, peripatêsis. pan de agathon lusiteles einai kai sumpheron kai deon kai chrêsimon kai euchrêston kai kalon kai ôphelimon kai dikaion kai haireton. agathon de esti to pasin epheton. agathon oun estin, eis ho panta anêrtêtai, auto de eis mêden.
Notes:
See also alpha 119, likewise a neuter singular.
This entry mostly reproduces Diogenes Laertius 7.94-98 (who supposedly is quoting an extract of Stoic ethics). The Suda text contains important omissions as well as different readings (the D.L. readings are, for the most part, much better).
[1] D.L. gives th\n pra=cin th\n kat' a)reth/n, "the action according to virtue" or simply "the virtuous action", as a gloss on a second sense in which virtue and what participates in it are called "good": that according to which being benefited results.
[2] D.L. has o(ri/zontai, "they define", which makes clear that a new definition is being given here.
[3] This puzzling list of examples does not occur in D.L.
[4] The text given by Suda is misleading; D.L. gives a)gaqw=n mikta/, "mixed goods", instead of a)gaqw=n mikra/, "little goods".
[5] cf. Aristotle, Topica 1094a2-3, with Alexander of Aphrodisias's commentary 93.8.
[6] Plotinus, Enneads 1.7.1, 21-22 (identified by Henry [below] 157 n.2, as noted in Adler's addenda).
References:
J. Annas, The Morality of Happiness (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 1993
Henry, P. "Suidas, Le Larousse et le Littré de l'antiquité grecque." Les Etudes classiques (1937): 155-62
Keywords: children; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; philosophy
Translated by: Marcelo Boeri on 26 May 2000@18:40:04.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified translation, added keyword, sets status) on 6 June 2001@00:38:37.
William Hutton (Added betacoding) on 6 June 2001@00:44:50.
David Whitehead (added notes; cosmetics) on 16 January 2003@05:49:31.
David Hitchcock (Modified translation, added notes) on 24 December 2004@06:46:10.
David Hitchcock on 24 December 2004@06:51:54.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@08:00:23.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 16 November 2005@07:50:17.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:37:50.
Catharine Roth (added note 6; cosmetics) on 22 May 2008@15:01:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@06:23:36.
David Whitehead (expanded n.6) on 17 January 2014@05:26:23.

Headword: Agathôn agathides
Adler number: alpha,123
Translated headword: skeins of good things
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The proverb is used in the comic poets in reference to a lot of good things.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] 'sea of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] 'anthills of good things', in reference to an abundance of good fortune.[3]
Also [sc. attested is] 'heap of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things and a lot of good fortune.[4]
Greek Original:
Agathôn agathides: tattetai hê paroimia para tois kômikois epi tôn pollôn agathôn. kai Agathôn thalassa, epi plêthous agathôn. kai Agathôn murmêkiai, epi plêthous eudaimonias. kai Agathôn sôros, epi plêthous agathôn kai pollês eudaimonias.
Notes:
The wordplay of the headword phrase a)gaqw=n a)gaqi/des is hard to render in English. 'Bundles of bounties' might do.
[1] (Same material in Photius.) Again at alpha 2601; and see also nu 77 and tau 147.
[2] Again at pi 2049.
[3] Comica adespota fr. 827 Kock, now 796 K.-A.
[4] cf. Apostolius 1.5, etc.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; ethics; imagery; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:28:16.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; minor cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@03:44:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:09:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:28:42.
David Whitehead (corrected a ref) on 16 March 2012@07:56:43.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 December 2014@04:31:45.
David Whitehead (coding) on 12 July 2015@03:58:05.

Headword: Agathônios
Adler number: alpha,125
Translated headword: Agathonios, Agathonius
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name.[1]
[The man] who was king of Tartessos.[2]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Agathon's pipe-playing": the soft and relaxed [kind]; alternatively that which is neither loose nor harsh, but temperate and very sweet.[3]
Greek Original:
Agathônios: onoma kurion. hos ebasileuse tês Tartêssou. kai Agathônios aulêsis: hê malakê kai eklelumenê: ê hê mête chalara, mête pikra, all' eukratos kai hêdistê.
Notes:
[1] Herodotus 1.163 gives it as Arganthonios (text at web address 1). See also tau 137.
[2] In southern Spain; probably the Biblical Tarshish. See generally tau 137 and OCD(4) s.v. (p.1433).
[3] Zenobius 1.2. On Agathon (an Athenian poet of the late C5 BC) and his reputation for softness see alpha 124; and on his aulos music, M.L. West, Ancient Greek Music (Oxford 1992) 354-5.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; ethics; geography; historiography; history; imagery; meter and music; proverbs; tragedy
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:33:27.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 25 April 2002@11:17:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:14:00.
Catharine Roth (cross-reference, italics, keyword) on 18 September 2006@18:09:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:42:50.
David Whitehead on 22 December 2011@07:43:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:34:58.

Headword: Agathoi d' aridakrues andres
Adler number: alpha,126
Translated headword: tearful men are good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In reference to those who are strongly inclined toward pity.
Greek Original:
Agathoi d' aridakrues andres: epi tôn sphodra pros eleon rhepontôn.
Note:
Same entry in Photius, and the same or very similar ones in the paroemiographers. This version of the proverb is the second half of a line of hexameter verse (complete with the particle d'); there are slight variants in (e.g.) the scholia to Homer, Iliad 1.349.
Keywords: daily life; epic; ethics; poetry; proverbs
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:57:53.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 2 April 2001@04:49:39.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@08:02:14.
David Whitehead (augmented note; another keyword) on 22 December 2011@07:50:50.

Headword: Agapô
Adler number: alpha,161
Translated headword: I love, I am satisfied with
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The 'I am satisfied with' [sense] takes a dative: "Being satisfied with the good things that he already had." [1] But [sc. also used] with an accusative: "thou shalt love God with all thy soul."[2]
Greek Original:
Agapô: to arkoumai dotikêi: agapôn tois huparchousin autôi agathois: aitiatikêi de: agapêseis ton theon ex holês psuchês.
Notes:
(A marginal addition, Adler reports, in ms A.)
See also alpha 150, alpha 159, alpha 160.
[1] a)gapw=n toi=s u(parxousin a)gaqoi=s: Lysias 2.21 (web address 1) here omitting the crucial 'not' at the beginning of the phrase and adding an interpolated au)tw=|.
[2] a)gaph/seis to\n qeo/n Deuteronomy 6:5 LXX.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; religion; rhetoric
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@12:58:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation and notes, added link, keywords, set status) on 26 June 2001@13:05:31.
David Whitehead (added keyword) on 3 February 2003@07:20:41.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 26 March 2008@01:29:26.
David Whitehead (another note; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@06:41:03.
Catharine Roth (corrected betacode) on 31 March 2015@01:17:24.
David Whitehead (x-refs) on 5 April 2015@10:08:02.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:37:29.

Headword: Angareia
Adler number: alpha,162
Translated headword: compulsory labour, corvee
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Surely "of pack mules".[1]
Also [sc. attested is] a)/ggaros: [meaning] labourer, servant, porter; whence we speak of a)ggarei/a [to describe] involuntary compulsion and service brought about by force.[2]
Greek Original:
Angareia: lian angarôn hêmionôn. kai Angaros: ergatês, hupêretês, achthophoros: hothen angareian anankên akousion legomen kai ek bias ginomenên hupêresian.
Notes:
For the (unglossed) headword, again under alpha 163, see generally LSJ s.v.; and cf. alpha 164, alpha 165 alpha 166.
[1] The force of li/an is not self-evident here, but see generally LSJ s.v. (The remainder of the phrase might be a quotation, from Libanius, Oration 18.143.)
[2] Same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha94 Theodoridis.
Keywords: daily life; definition; ethics; rhetoric; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:06:05.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:26:56.
William Hutton (Cosmetics) on 28 June 2001@13:52:43.
William Hutton (Added notes) on 28 June 2001@14:04:48.
Anne Mahoney (make the Greek beta-code) on 6 July 2001@11:39:53.
David Whitehead (modified translation; cosmetics) on 11 July 2003@07:40:21.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@07:54:02.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2; tweaking) on 16 August 2013@08:28:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 31 March 2015@01:18:34.
Catharine Roth (betacode cosmeticule) on 5 April 2015@19:19:42.

Headword: Angaros
Adler number: alpha,163
Translated headword: a)/ggaros
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
and a)ggarei/a, public and compulsory servitude.[1]
"For just as to him eating seemed to be a mere distraction, with nature as it were putting him into compulsory servitude [a)ggareuome/nhs] when it came to food."[2]
Greek Original:
Angaros: kai Angareia, hê dêmosia kai anankaia douleia. hôsper gar ti autôi parergon to esthiein tês phuseôs auton angareuomenês peri ta brômata ephaineto einai.
Notes:
See also alpha 162, alpha 164, alpha 165.
[1] Same glossing in Hesychius and elsewhere.
[2] An approximation of Procopius, Secret History 13.29, on Justinian.
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; ethics; food; historiography; history; imagery
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:07:47.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:31:52.
William Hutton (Modified translation, added cross reference) on 28 June 2001@13:57:28.
William Hutton on 28 June 2001@13:59:24.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 3 February 2003@07:31:38.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@01:32:33.
David Whitehead (another note and keyword; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@07:59:50.

Headword: Angaroi
Adler number: alpha,165
Translated headword: messengers
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those who carry letters in relays.[1] They are also [called] 'couriers' [a)sta/ndai].[2] The words [are] Persian. Aeschylus in Agamemnon [writes]: "beacon sent beacon hither with relaying fire."[3] The word is also used for conveyors of freight and more generally of inanimate objects and slaves. Also [sc. attested is] the [verb] a)ggaroforei=n in reference to carrying burdens. And [the verb] a)ggareu/esqai means what we now speak of as being impressed to carry burdens and labor of that sort. Menander offers this example in the Sikyonios: "someone arriving by sea puts in? He is labelled an enemy. And if he has anything nice it's pressed into service [a)ggareu/etai]."[4]
Greek Original:
Angaroi: hoi ek diadochês grammatophoroi. hoi de autoi kai astandai. ta de onomata Persika. Aischulos Agamemnoni: phruktos de phrukton deuro ap' angarou puros epempe. tithetai to onoma kai epi tôn phortêgôn kai holôs tôn anaisthêtôn kai andrapodôdôn. kai to Angarophorein epi tou phortia pherein. kai Angareuesthai kalousin hôsper hêmeis nun to eis phortêgian kai toiautên tina hupêresian agesthai. Menandros kai touto en tôi Sikuôniôi paristêsin: ho pleôn katêchthê; krineth' houtos polemios. ean echêi ti malakon, angareuetai.
Notes:
Same entry in Photius, similar ones elsewhere.
LSJ entry at web address 1. See also alpha 162, alpha 163, alpha 164.
[1] cf. Herodotus 3.126 (web address 2) and esp. 8.98 (web address 3).
[2] cf. alpha 4420. The word appears also at Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 3.122A (3.94 Kaibel); Eustathius Commentaries on Homer's Odyssey vol. 2 p. 189.6; Hesychius alpha7814; Plutarch, Alexander 18 (bis); De Alex. fort. virt. 326E; 340C.
[3] Aeschylus, Agamemnon 282f. (web address 4), where the mss have a)gge/lou, an obvious gloss.
[4] Menander, Sikyonios fr.4 Sandbach [= fr 440 Kock].
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3,
Web address 4
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; military affairs; science and technology; tragedy; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:13:42.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified translation, added cross-references, keywords, links, set status) on 5 July 2001@12:26:03.
William Hutton (Fixed faulty linksz) on 5 July 2001@12:31:12.
Catharine Roth (added keyword and link; cosmetic) on 5 July 2001@13:14:47.
Anne Mahoney (make the Greek beta-code) on 6 July 2001@11:37:41.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:14:56.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, reordered links, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@01:38:57.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:32:31.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@08:14:35.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 12 August 2013@22:38:38.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 12 August 2013@23:22:50.
David Whitehead (tweaked a ref) on 14 January 2015@03:18:54.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:40:43.

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