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Headword: Abanteios
Adler number: alpha,15
Translated headword: Abanteios, Abantius, Abantian
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The [house][1] of Abas.[2] Also [attested is] Abantiades.[3]
Greek Original:
Abanteios: ho tou Abantos. kai Abantiadês.
Notes:
Adler cites as a comparandum Lexicon Ambrosianum 22, 23, 28.
[1] This suppletion is suggested by the corresponding entry in the Lexicon of pseudo-Zonaras 5.1, which is identical to this entry apart from the headword phrase: vs. *)aba/nteios here, ps.-Zonaras has *)aba/nteios do/mos ('Abantian house'). The headword here could serve as a modifier for any substantive of the masculine gender, including a son or descendant, as is suggested by the subsequent reference to a patronymic form. The adjective is unattested outside of grammars and lexica, and ps.-Zonaras provides the only example of it modifying a specific substantive. Stephanus of Byzantium in his entry on 'Abantis', an early name for Euboea (cf. Hesiod fr. 296 Merkelbach-West), notes it as the possessive adjective relating to the Abantes or to their legendary founder Abas, whom Stephanos identifies either as the son of Lynkeus (see note 2 below) or a homonymous son of Poseidon. Cf. also Herodianus Peri orthographias 3.2.429.34 and 465.14.
[2] Not the Abas of alpha 20, but one of the mythological figures of that name; in fact almost certainly A. the son of Lynkeus, king of Argos [Myth, Place] after Danaos and father of the twins Akrisios and Proitos (Pausanias 2.16.2 (web address 1); Apollodorus, Library 2.2.1 (web address 2)).
[3] This term is used by (e.g.) Ovid both for an actual son of Abas (Metamorphoses 4.607 (Acrisius): web address 3) and in the sense of a more distant descendant (4.673 (Perseus, great-grandson of Abas; cf. pi 1372): web address 4).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3,
Web address 4
Keywords: biography; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; mythology; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:47:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Entered headword, modified note, added keywords, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:34:40.
David Whitehead (augmented and modified note; added keyword) on 27 February 2003@07:23:08.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; augmented notes and keywords; raised status) on 23 August 2007@07:12:31.
William Hutton (augmented notes, tweaked translation) on 23 August 2007@13:11:02.
William Hutton (tweaks and typos) on 24 August 2007@02:44:20.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:38:57.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 5 August 2013@01:08:34.

Headword: Abaris
Adler number: alpha,18
Translated headword: Abaris, Avars
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Scythian, son of Seuthes. He wrote the so-called Scythinian Oracles[1] and Marriage of the river Hebros and Purifications and a Theogony in prose and Arrival of Apollo among the Hyperboreans in meter. He came from Scythia to Greece.
The legendary arrow belongs to him, the one he flew on from Greece to Hyperborean Scythia. It was given to him by Apollo.[2]
Gregory the Theologian mentioned this man in his Epitaphios for Basil the Great.[3]
They say[4] that once, when there was a plague throughout the entire inhabited world, Apollo told the Greeks and barbarians who had come to consult his oracle that the Athenian people should make prayers on behalf of all of them. So, many peoples sent ambassadors to them, and Abaris, they say, came as ambassador of the Hyperboreans in the third Olympiad.[5]
[Note] that the Bulgarians thoroughly destroyed the Avars[6] by force.
[Note] that these Avars drove out the Sabinorians, when they themselves had been expelled by peoples living near the shore of the Ocean, who left their own land when a mist formed in the flood of the Ocean and a crowd of griffins appeared; the story was that they would not stop until they had devoured the race of men. So the people driven away by these monsters invaded their neighbors. As the invaders were stronger, the others submitted and left, just as the Saragurians, when they were driven out, went to the Akatziri Huns.[7]
The declension is Abaris, Abaridos [genitive singular], Abaridas [accusative plural], and with apocope Abaris [nominative plural].
See about these things under 'Bulgarians'.[8]
Greek Original:
Abaris: Skuthês, Seuthou huios. sunegrapsato de chrêsmous tous kaloumenous Skuthinous kai Gamon Hebrou tou potamou kai Katharmous kai Theogonian katalogadên kai Apollônos aphixin eis Huperboreous emmetrôs. hêke de ek Skuthôn eis Hellada. toutou ho muthologoumenos oïstos, tou petomenou apo tês Hellados mechri tôn Huperboreôn Skuthôn: edothê de autôi para tou Apollônos. toutou kai Grêgorios ho Theologos en tôi eis ton megan Basileion Epitaphiôi mnêmên pepoiêtai. phasi de hoti loimou kata pasan tên oikoumenên gegonotos aneilen ho Apollôn manteuomenois Hellêsi kai barbarois ton Athênaiôn dêmon huper pantôn euchas poiêsasthai. presbeuomenôn de pollôn ethnôn pros autous, kai Abarin ex Huperboreôn presbeutên aphikesthai legousi kata tên g# Olumpiada. hoti tous Abaris hoi Boulgaroi kata kratos ardên êphanisan. hoti hoi Abaris houtoi exêlasan Sabinôras, metanastai genomenoi hupo ethnôn oikountôn men tên parôkeanitin aktên, tên de chôran apolipontôn dia to ex anachuseôs tou Ôkeanou homichlôdes ginomenon, kai grupôn de plêthos anaphanen: hoper ên logos mê proteron pausasthai prin ê boran poiêsai to tôn anthrôpôn genos. dio dê hupo tônde elaunomenoi tôn deinôn tois plêsiochôrois eneballon: kai tôn epiontôn dunatôterôn ontôn hoi tên ephodon huphistamenoi metanistanto, hôsper kai hoi Saragouroi elathentes pros tois Akatirois Ounnois egenonto. klinetai de Abaris, Abaridos, tous Abaridas, kai kata apokopên Abaris. zêtei peri tôn autôn en tôi Boulgaroi.
Notes:
See generally A.H. Griffiths in OCD(4) p.1: "legendary devotee of Apollo from the far north, a shamanistic missionary and saviour-figure like Aristeas [alpha 3900]". Adler credits this part of the entry to the Epitome Onomatologi Hesychii Milesii.
[1] Or in one manuscript, 'Skythian'.
[2] Perhaps from a scholion on the passage about to be cited (so Adler). Cf. Herodotos 4.36.1 (web address 1).
[3] Gregory of Nazianzus PG 36.524b.
[4] This material is from Harpokration s.v. *)/abaris
[5] 768-765 BCE. Harpokration (see preceding note) cites Hippostratos (FGrH 568 F4) to this effect, but adds that there were later alternatives: the twenty-first Olympiad (696-693) or "the time of Croesus, king of Lydia" (so Pindar, fr.270 Snell-Maehler), i.e. c.560-546.
[6] The word used for the Avars here, *)aba/ris, is a homograph for the name of the Hyperborean wise man Abaris, so this separate section on the Avars is included in this entry. There is no indication that the lexicographer sees any connection between the two topics.
[7] Priscus fr.30 FHG (4.104), still 30 Bornmann. The final part reappears at alpha 820 and sigma 111.
[8] beta 423.
References:
RE Abaris (1) I.16-17
Macartney, C.A. "On the Greek Sources for the History of the Turks in the Sixth Century." BSOAS 11 (1944): 266-275
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; Christianity; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; historiography; history; mythology; philosophy; poetry; religion; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@17:03:41.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation and notes, added keywords, set status.) on 19 January 2001@14:57:43.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and bibliography; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@05:20:43.
David Whitehead (added note) on 14 February 2001@06:09:48.
Mihai Olteanu (The only thracian item concerning Abaris is his father's name. Everything else pledes for his sythian ('hyperborean') origin. This is why I suppose we deal here with a copist mistake, and I propose the emendation: ́Αβαρις: Σκύθης, *Σκύθου υἱός (for Σκύθης as mythological character, see for example Herodotos 4,10).) on 22 January 2002@21:55:20.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 January 2002@03:11:25.
David Whitehead (augmented n.6 and added a keyword) on 5 October 2004@03:21:13.
William Hutton (augmented notes, added link and keywords, set status) on 24 August 2007@11:05:00.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@00:16:43.
David Whitehead (another note; cosmetics) on 28 March 2014@06:23:27.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:06:21.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 31 January 2015@09:22:24.

Headword: Abas
Adler number: alpha,20
Translated headword: Abas
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A sophist, who left Historical Commentaries and an Art of Rhetoric.
Greek Original:
Abas: sophistês, Historika hupomnêmata kai Technên rhêtorikên katalipôn.
Notes:
Adler cites Epitome Onomatologi Hesychii Milesii for the entry.
See RE 1.19, Abas(11). Jacoby's Abas, FGrH 46, is a homonym, author of a Troika.
Reference:
Epitome Onomatologi Hesychii Milesii (ed. Wentzel, Texte und Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der altchristlichen Litteratur XIII.3)
Keywords: biography; historiography; philosophy; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:57:09.
Vetted by:
Svetla Slaveva on 31 January 2000@23:27:03.
Svetla Slaveva on 1 February 2000@11:17:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation and keywords; augmented note; cosmetics) on 8 July 2003@08:27:47.
William Hutton (augmented note, set status) on 24 August 2007@23:41:32.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 19 December 2011@06:10:09.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 5 August 2013@00:50:02.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:49:14.

Headword: Abasanistos
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
Abasanistos: agumnastos ê anexetastos, adokimastos. eirêtai de apo tês basanou tês chrusochoïkês lithou, en hêi dokimazousi to chrusion. echrêsato de Ailianos en tôi peri pronoias tôi abasanistos anti tou aneu odunês.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] ba/sanos can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.

Headword: Aboulein
Adler number: alpha,61
Translated headword: to be unwilling
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] not to wish, or not to resolve. Plato [sc. uses the word].[1]
Greek Original:
Aboulein: mê boulesthai, ê mê bouleuesthai. Platôn.
Notes:
Same entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha45 Theodoridis.
[1] Plato, Republic 4.437C (web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; philosophy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:21:47.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note and keyword) on 22 September 2000@03:03:59.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added keyword) on 30 January 2001@22:35:25.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 15 August 2007@09:40:08.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 24 March 2008@18:22:22.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:36:18.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:51:19.

Headword: Abra
Adler number: alpha,68
Translated headword: favorite
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Not simply a maidservant nor even the pretty maidservant is called [favorite], but a daughter of one of the house slaves and an honored one, whether born in the house or not. Menander in False Heracles [writes]: "the mother of these two sisters is dead. A concubine of their father's, who used to be their mother's favorite slave, is bringing them up."[1] In Sikyonian: "he bought a beloved slave instead and did not hand the slave over to his wife, but kept her apart, as is appropriate for a free woman."[2] In Faithless One: "I thought if the old man got the gold, he'd get himself a favorite slave right away."[3]
Iamblichus [writes]: "since this was difficult and something of a rarity, with the [woman] housekeeper on guard and another favorite slave-woman also present, he persuades the daughter to run away without her parents' knowledge."[4]
Greek Original:
Abra: oute haplôs therapaina oute hê eumorphos therapaina legetai, all' oikotrips gunaikos korê kai entimos, eite oikogenês eite mê. Menandros Pseudêraklei: mêtêr tethnêke tain adelphain tain duein tautain. trephei de pallakê tis tou patros autas, abra tês mêtros autôn genomenê. Sikuôniôi: kai abran gar antônoumenos erômenên, tautêi men ou paredôk' echein, trephein de chôris, hôs eleutherai prepei. Apistôi: ômên ei to chrusion laboi ho gerôn, therapainan euthus êgorasmenên abran esesthai. Iamblichos: epei de touto chalepon ên kai spanion ti to tês oikourou phulattousês kai abras tinos allês sumparousês, anapeithei tên korên lathousan tous goneis apodranai.
Notes:
The main part of this entry is also in Photius, Lexicon alpha50 Theodoridis (where the headword is plural); similar material in other lexica.
LSJ uses the rough breathing (a(/bra) for the word it defines specifically as 'favorite slave'. See web address 1 below.
[1] Menander fr. 520 Kock, 453 K.-Th., 411 K.-A.
[2] Menander fr. 438 Kock (1 Sandbach).
[3] Menander fr. 64 Kock, 58 K.-Th., 63 K.-A.
[4] Iamblichus, Babyloniaca fr. 56 Habrich.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; gender and sexuality; philosophy; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:13:15.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:59:03.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added link) on 30 January 2001@23:04:27.
David Whitehead (added keyword) on 31 January 2001@04:33:38.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 24 April 2002@03:20:49.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 15 August 2007@10:03:18.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:26:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:03:54.
David Whitehead (updated refs) on 16 August 2013@07:04:59.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@03:49:04.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@06:54:57.

Headword: Abrôn
Adler number: alpha,97
Translated headword: Abron, Habron
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Phrygian or Rhodian, grammarian, student of Tryphon,[1] sophist at Rome, the offspring of slaves, according to Hermippus.[2]
Greek Original:
Abrôn: Phrux ê Rhodios, grammatikos, mathêtês Truphônos, sophisteusas en Rhômêi, gegonôs de ek doulôn, hôs phêsin Hermippos.
Notes:
Presumably Habron (the aspirated version of the name is the more authentic), RE 8.2155 #4 (and OCD(4) s.v.), author of a treatise On the Pronoun in the C1 CE.
[1] Tryphon: tau 1115.
[2] For Hermippus see epsilon 3045. This is his fr. 73 FHG (3.52).
Reference:
R. Berndt, 'Die Fragmente des Grammatikers Habron', Berliner philologioscher Wochenschrift 35 (1915) 1452-1455, 1483
Keywords: biography; daily life; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; philosophy; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:46:35.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@22:49:38.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and bibliography) on 2 February 2001@03:41:19.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, cross-reference) on 9 December 2009@17:25:23.
David Whitehead (added bibligraphy and another keyword) on 21 December 2011@06:41:35.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 17 January 2014@04:59:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:16:02.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:50:39.

Headword: Abudos
Adler number: alpha,101
Translated headword: Abudos, Abydos, Abydus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A city.[1]
The word is applied to an informant [sukofa/nths] because of the common belief that the people of Abudos were informers.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] an adverb, *)abudo/qi, [meaning] in Abudos.[3]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] *a)/budon fluari/an ["Abudos nonsense"], [meaning] great [nonsense].[4]
And [sc. attested is] *)abudhno\s, [meaning] he [who comes] from Abudos.[5]
Greek Original:
Abudos: polis. epi sukophantou tattetai hê lexis, dia to dokein sukophantas einai tous Abudênous. kai epirrêma, Abudothi, en Abudôi. kai Abudon phluarian, tên pollên. kai Abudênos, ho apo Abudou.
Notes:
[1] = Lexicon Ambrosianum 82, according to Adler. In fact two cities of this name are known: one on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid G4; present-day Maltepe) and Abydos/Ebot in Upper Egypt (Barrington Atlas map 77 grid F4); without much doubt, the former is meant here. (In Hesychius alpha23 the gloss is fuller -- 'a Trojan city of the Hellespont'. Latte regards the entry as prompted by Homer, Iliad 2.836, accusative case, although similar wording appears in a late scholion to Iliad 17.584, where the adverbial derivative a)budo/qi appears -- see n. 3 below). See also alpha 100, sigma 465, and generally OCD(4) s.v.
[2] = the first sentence of Pausanias the Atticist alpha3 and Photius alpha63 Theodoridis; cf. also Zenobius 1.1, s.v. *)abudhno\n e)pifo/rhma (alpha 100), and Kassel-Austin, PCG III.2 p.376 on Aristophanes fr. 755. See generally sigma 1330, sigma 1331, sigma 1332.
[3] Probably from commentary to Homer, Iliad 17.584, the only literary attestation of this adverb prior to Musaeus Grammaticus (5/6 CE); cf. Apollonius Dyscolus On Adverbs 2.1.1.164.
[4] = Synagoge Codex B alpha44, but in the better mss of Photius (Lexicon alpha64 Theodoridis) the adjective (in a nominative-case entry) is a)/buqos ('bottomless'), surely correctly; cf. alpha 104. The ultimate source may be Plato, Parmenides 130D, though there too the text is uncertain: perhaps ei)/s tin' a)/buqon fluari/an (web address 1), though the alternatives include ei)/s tina bu=qon fluari/as. On the adjective a)/buqos, a synonym for a)/bussos, see the LSJ entry at web address 2.
[5] There are many literary attestations of this form of the ethnic adjective (nominative singular masculine), beginning with Herodotus 4.138. For an instance in the Suda see pi 71.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; geography; law; philosophy; proverbs
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@13:59:06.

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