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Headword: A a
Adler number: alpha,1
Translated headword: ah! ah!
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In Aristophanes an adverb accompanying surprise and command. "Ah! ah! Don't get that torch near me!"[1]
'Ah! ah!' must be read separately, not elided; and they both have smooth breathing.[2]. For if they were read together as one word, there would be no need of two accent marks.[3] "Ah" marks surprise, but "ha ha" is for awe, as Agathias says in the Epigrams: "ha, a very daring wax it was that formed..."[4]
Aab.[5]
Greek Original:
#
Notes:
[1] Aristophanes, Plutus [Wealth] 1052 (web address 1). The first sentence is derived from scholia to this passage, and this may also be true of the rest of the entry.
[2] That is, it is "ah! ah!", not "ha! ha!" A difference registered in Greek by the orientation of a small breathing mark that is easily reversed in transcription, especially since by the time the Suda was compiled the initial 'h' had ceased to be pronounced.
[3] i.e. a)\ a)/ is two words, a)a/ would be one.
[4] Greek Anthology 1.34.2; again (with slight variations) at mu 389 and sigma 664.
[5] This gloss-less addendum is actually a separate entry that occurs only in ms S. (In Adler's numbering system this is designated alpha 1b, while the main entry is alpha 1a.) Apparently this is a reference to the Hebrew month of Av, attested with this Greek spelling only in Joannes Lydus, De mensibus 3.22.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: chronology; comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 9 November 1999@09:47:43.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised vetting status) on 26 September 2000@14:01:40.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@04:21:58.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 April 2007@04:35:29.
William Hutton (modified translation, rearranged layout, added note and link, set status) on 19 August 2007@10:41:27.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 22 March 2008@17:08:15.
Catharine Roth (coding, typo) on 22 March 2008@19:48:38.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:43:10.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 5 August 2013@01:21:19.

Headword: Abaton
Adler number: alpha,23
Translated headword: inaccessible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] sacred, unapproachable, desolate;[1] also an 'inaccessible' road, [meaning] impassable.
Greek Original:
Abaton: hieron, aprositon, erêmon: kai hodos abatos, hê aporeutos.
Notes:
The headword is the neuter singular form of this adjective, which, as a substantive, can be used for the adyton of a temple or shrine.
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge alpha5, and Photius, Lexicon alpha31 Theodoridis; cf. Hesychius alpha91 (where Latte confidently asserts that the headword is quoted from Euripides, Bacchae 10).
Keywords: architecture; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:21:29.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keywords and status) on 20 January 2001@11:38:48.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added a keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:31:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keyword, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:18:41.
Catharine Roth (deleted keyword) on 3 October 2007@19:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:05.
William Hutton (Modifed and updated notes.) on 11 November 2007@07:16:09.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@06:14:37.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@03:58:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@00:52:27.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:33:19.
William Hutton (typo) on 21 August 2013@10:06:07.

Headword: Abelterokokkux
Adler number: alpha,31
Translated headword: silly cuckoo
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The vacuous and silly man.[1]
Greek Original:
Abelterokokkux: ho kenos kai abelteros.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 32, alpha 33.
[1] Plato Comicus fr. 64 Kock = 65 K.-A. (Phrynichus 48.11). For "cuckoo" alone, in this sense, see e.g. Aristophanes, Acharnians 598 (web address 1 below), and Hesychius s.v. ko/kkuges.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; ethics; imagery; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:28:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, keywords, raised status) on 24 January 2001@22:19:23.
David Whitehead (modified translation and note) on 25 January 2001@03:48:12.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 8 October 2007@00:27:35.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 23 March 2008@01:09:06.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@01:04:18.
David Whitehead (x-refs; more keywords;) on 19 December 2011@06:48:41.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:23:30.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:55.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 1 January 2015@08:53:56.

Headword: Abelteros
Adler number: alpha,32
Translated headword: thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] mindless, stupid. For the intelligent man [is] be/lteros ["thoughtful, superior"].[1]
"No, by Zeus, not the greedy and thoughtless fellow, but the mindless and conceitedly slow-witted."[2] Menander in Perinthia [writes]: "any servant who takes an idle and easy master and deceives him does not know what a great accomplishment it is to make a greater fool of one who is already thoughtless".[3] They also call a)belthri/a ["thoughtlessness"] an a)belth/rion ["thoughtless thing"]. Anaxandrides in Helen[4] [writes]: "[A:] an anchor, a little boat, - call it what vessel you want. [B:] O Heracles of the sacred precinct of thoughtlessness. [A:] But one could not estimate its size."
Also [sc. attested is] a)belthri/a, [meaning] stupidity.
Or mindlessness.
Menander [writes]: "their mind drove them to such thoughtlessness that they prayed for victory over each other rather than over the enemy."[5]
Greek Original:
Abelteros: anoêtos, asunetos. belteros gar ho phronimos. ou ma Di' ouch ho pleonektês kai agnômôn, all' ho anoêtos kai euêthês meta chaunotêtos. Menandros Perinthiai: hostis paralabôn despotên apragmona kai kouphon exapatai therapôn, ouk oid' ho ti houtos megaleion esti diapepragmenos, epabelterôsas ton pote abelteron. legousi de kai abeltêrion tên abeltêrian. Alexandridês Helenêi: ankura, lembos, skeuos ho ti boulei lege. ô Hêrakleis abeltêriou temenikou. all' oud' an eipein to megethos dunaito tis. kai Abeltêria, hê aphrosunê. ê anoêsia. Menandros: eis touto de abeltêrias êlasen autois ho nous, hôste thateron meros tên kata thaterou mallon ê tên kata tôn polemiôn euchesthai nikên.
Notes:
On this headword, a comic formation literally meaning non-superior, see generally LSJ s.v. (web address 1 below); and cf. alpha 31, alpha 33.
[1] These glosses are paralleled in a variety of other lexica (and in the scholia to Aristophanes, Clouds 1201 and Ecclesiazusae 768).
[2] Quotation (an illustration of the first of the glossing words, not the headword) unidentifiable; also in Photius and Aelius Dionysius.
[3] Menander fr. 393 Kock.
[4] Anaxandrides [see generally alpha 1982] fr. 12 Kock (and K.-A.). But note that Adler prints the manuscript reading "Alexandrides", on the strength of the (apparent) mention of such a playwright in alpha 3824. On the emendation to Anaxandrides, see Toup vol. 1 p. 9; Adler attributes the emendation to 'Iunius' (probably Adriaan de Jonghe, 1511-1575, author of a Greek/Latin Lexicon).
[5] Not M. the comic poet, quoted above, but the C6 CE historian Menander Protector [mu 591]: his fr. 28 Blockley.
Reference:
Toup, Jonathan, and Richard Porson. Emendationes in Suidam Et Hesychium, Et Alios Lexicographos Graecos. Oxford 1790
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; military affairs; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:02:21.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; added keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@05:52:19.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 23 March 2008@13:05:56.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@04:34:27.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@11:17:06.
Catharine Roth (fixed note number, augmented note, added bibliography, tweaked link) on 15 May 2008@15:34:15.
David Whitehead (typo) on 16 May 2008@07:55:44.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 20 May 2008@11:50:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:38:00.
David Whitehead (updated a reference; cosmetics) on 3 January 2012@04:21:06.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 22 December 2014@04:27:32.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@09:15:50.

Headword: Abelterôtatoi
Adler number: alpha,33
Translated headword: most thoughtless, very thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Aristophanes [writes]: "before this most/very thoughtless men used to sit gaping -- Dolts, Half-wits".[1]
Greek Original:
Abelterôtatoi: Aristophanês: teôs d' abelterôtatoi kechênotes Mammakuthoi Melitidai kathêntai.
Notes:
(Entry lacking, Adler reports, in ms S.)
Masculine nominative plural of this superlative, evidently from the quotation given. See also alpha 31, alpha 32.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 989-991 (web address 1), quoted also at beta 468 and mu 121. The other two terms used here (each of them apparently stemming from a proper name) stand at least as much in need of glossing as does this adjective: see Dover (below) 315-16. For the formation of the adjective, see also the entry in LSJ s.v. (web address 2 below).
Reference:
Aristophanes, Frogs, edited with introduction and commentary by K.J. Dover (Oxford 1993)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:03:23.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented note; added bibliography; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:29:41.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 11 January 2001@12:49:46.
William Hutton on 2 February 2001@11:46:00.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 23 March 2008@14:05:57.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@05:10:07.
Catharine Roth on 13 April 2009@13:11:48.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:29:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:25:45.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:24.
David Whitehead (another note) on 28 March 2014@06:25:35.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 April 2015@09:16:57.

Headword: Abra
Adler number: alpha,68
Translated headword: favorite
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Not simply a maidservant nor even the pretty maidservant is called [favorite], but a daughter of one of the house slaves and an honored one, whether born in the house or not. Menander in False Heracles [writes]: "the mother of these two sisters is dead. A concubine of their father's, who used to be their mother's favorite slave, is bringing them up."[1] In Sikyonian: "he bought a beloved slave instead and did not hand the slave over to his wife, but kept her apart, as is appropriate for a free woman."[2] In Faithless One: "I thought if the old man got the gold, he'd get himself a favorite slave right away."[3]
Iamblichus [writes]: "since this was difficult and something of a rarity, with the [woman] housekeeper on guard and another favorite slave-woman also present, he persuades the daughter to run away without her parents' knowledge."[4]
Greek Original:
Abra: oute haplôs therapaina oute hê eumorphos therapaina legetai, all' oikotrips gunaikos korê kai entimos, eite oikogenês eite mê. Menandros Pseudêraklei: mêtêr tethnêke tain adelphain tain duein tautain. trephei de pallakê tis tou patros autas, abra tês mêtros autôn genomenê. Sikuôniôi: kai abran gar antônoumenos erômenên, tautêi men ou paredôk' echein, trephein de chôris, hôs eleutherai prepei. Apistôi: ômên ei to chrusion laboi ho gerôn, therapainan euthus êgorasmenên abran esesthai. Iamblichos: epei de touto chalepon ên kai spanion ti to tês oikourou phulattousês kai abras tinos allês sumparousês, anapeithei tên korên lathousan tous goneis apodranai.
Notes:
The main part of this entry is also in Photius, Lexicon alpha50 Theodoridis (where the headword is plural); similar material in other lexica.
LSJ uses the rough breathing (a(/bra) for the word it defines specifically as 'favorite slave'. See web address 1 below.
[1] Menander fr. 520 Kock, 453 K.-Th., 411 K.-A.
[2] Menander fr. 438 Kock (1 Sandbach).
[3] Menander fr. 64 Kock, 58 K.-Th., 63 K.-A.
[4] Iamblichus, Babyloniaca fr. 56 Habrich.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; gender and sexuality; philosophy; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:13:15.
Vetted by:
Shannon N. Byrne on 20 May 2000@18:59:03.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added link) on 30 January 2001@23:04:27.
David Whitehead (added keyword) on 31 January 2001@04:33:38.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 24 April 2002@03:20:49.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 15 August 2007@10:03:18.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:26:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:03:54.
David Whitehead (updated refs) on 16 August 2013@07:04:59.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@03:49:04.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 24 December 2014@06:54:57.

Headword: Abelteros nous
Adler number: alpha,71
Translated headword: foolish mind
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"[A foolish mind,] empty, naive, young."
Greek Original:
Abelteros nous, chaunos, euêthês, neos.
Notes:
An iambic trimeter, unattributable to any particular author but regarded by Maas (BZ 28 (1928) 421) as coming from a comedy; now Kassel-Austin adespota fr. 915.
The entry is out of alphabetical order; cf. alpha 31, alpha 32, alpha 33.
Keywords: comedy; ethics; meter and music; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:27:46.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, keyword, set status) on 31 January 2001@12:52:43.
David Whitehead (rearranged headword and translation; added note; altered keyword) on 1 February 2001@03:30:55.
David Whitehead (internal reorganisation; augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:16:59.
David Whitehead (expanded note; another keyword) on 29 December 2014@03:01:59.
David Whitehead (my typo) on 2 April 2015@10:38:43.

Headword: Abrotonon
Adler number: alpha,95
Translated headword: wormwood
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Type of plant.
Greek Original:
Abrotonon: eidos botanês.
Notes:
Wormwood, or other Artemisia species; see e.g. Theophrastus Enquiry into Plants 6.7.3.
(Also a woman's name in New Comedy.)
Keywords: botany; comedy; definition; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:45:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, set status) on 1 February 2001@22:41:01.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 3 January 2005@10:48:59.
David Whitehead on 21 December 2011@06:29:50.
Catharine Roth (expanded abbreviation) on 24 November 2014@19:45:34.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 25 November 2014@23:07:45.

Headword: Abudos
Adler number: alpha,101
Translated headword: Abudos, Abydos, Abydus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A city.[1]
The word is applied to an informant [sukofa/nths] because of the common belief that the people of Abudos were informers.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] an adverb, *)abudo/qi, [meaning] in Abudos.[3]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] *a)/budon fluari/an ["Abudos nonsense"], [meaning] great [nonsense].[4]
And [sc. attested is] *)abudhno\s, [meaning] he [who comes] from Abudos.[5]
Greek Original:
Abudos: polis. epi sukophantou tattetai hê lexis, dia to dokein sukophantas einai tous Abudênous. kai epirrêma, Abudothi, en Abudôi. kai Abudon phluarian, tên pollên. kai Abudênos, ho apo Abudou.
Notes:
[1] = Lexicon Ambrosianum 82, according to Adler. In fact two cities of this name are known: one on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid G4; present-day Maltepe) and Abydos/Ebot in Upper Egypt (Barrington Atlas map 77 grid F4); without much doubt, the former is meant here. (In Hesychius alpha23 the gloss is fuller -- 'a Trojan city of the Hellespont'. Latte regards the entry as prompted by Homer, Iliad 2.836, accusative case, although similar wording appears in a late scholion to Iliad 17.584, where the adverbial derivative a)budo/qi appears -- see n. 3 below). See also alpha 100, sigma 465, and generally OCD(4) s.v.
[2] = the first sentence of Pausanias the Atticist alpha3 and Photius alpha63 Theodoridis; cf. also Zenobius 1.1, s.v. *)abudhno\n e)pifo/rhma (alpha 100), and Kassel-Austin, PCG III.2 p.376 on Aristophanes fr. 755. See generally sigma 1330, sigma 1331, sigma 1332.
[3] Probably from commentary to Homer, Iliad 17.584, the only literary attestation of this adverb prior to Musaeus Grammaticus (5/6 CE); cf. Apollonius Dyscolus On Adverbs 2.1.1.164.
[4] = Synagoge Codex B alpha44, but in the better mss of Photius (Lexicon alpha64 Theodoridis) the adjective (in a nominative-case entry) is a)/buqos ('bottomless'), surely correctly; cf. alpha 104. The ultimate source may be Plato, Parmenides 130D, though there too the text is uncertain: perhaps ei)/s tin' a)/buqon fluari/an (web address 1), though the alternatives include ei)/s tina bu=qon fluari/as. On the adjective a)/buqos, a synonym for a)/bussos, see the LSJ entry at web address 2.
[5] There are many literary attestations of this form of the ethnic adjective (nominative singular masculine), beginning with Herodotus 4.138. For an instance in the Suda see pi 71.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; geography; law; philosophy; proverbs
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@13:59:06.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@21:07:09.
Ross Scaife ✝ (fixed keywords) on 2 March 2000@17:48:48.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; replaced existing note; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:05:35.
Jennifer Benedict (added links, betacode fix, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:03:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 18 April 2011@14:40:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 25 April 2011@04:09:51.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@09:19:59.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1) on 1 February 2012@05:52:37.
David Whitehead (expansions to notes) on 16 August 2013@07:33:01.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 4 July 2014@08:19:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:21:46.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:35:15.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 22 December 2014@09:26:49.

Headword: Aburtakê
Adler number: alpha,103
Translated headword: sour-sauce, aburtake, abyrtake, abyrtace
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A sharp-flavored barbarian dish, prepared from leeks and cress[-seeds] and pomegranate kernels and other such things, quite clearly pungent. Theopompus in Theseus [writes]: "he will reach the land of the Medes, where aburtake is made mostly of cress and leeks."[1] The noun also appears in the Kekruphalos of Menander.[2]
Greek Original:
Aburtakê: hupotrimma barbarikon, kataskeuazomenon dia prasôn kai kardamôn kai rhoas kokkôn kai heterôn toioutôn, drimu dêlonoti. Theopompos Thêsei: hêxei de Mêdôn gaian, entha kardamôn pleistôn poieitai kai prasôn aburtakê. esti kai en Kekruphalôi Menandrou tounoma.
Notes:
[1] Theopompus fr. 17 Kock, now 18 Kassel-Austin. In the long list of food allowances for the Persian Kings (allegedly seen in Babylon by Alexander the Great) in Polyaenus 4.3.32 there is a mention of salted capers "from which they make abyrtakai".
[2] Menander fr. 280 Kock, 247 Koerte, now 217 Kassel-Austin. For other appearances of the word in comedy see LSJ s.v. at web address 1 below.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: botany; comedy; food; geography
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:00:55.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, added keywords, set status) on 5 February 2001@11:10:09.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes; cosmetics) on 6 February 2001@03:24:05.
David Whitehead (modified translation) on 14 July 2006@03:15:01.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:07:25.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and link) on 19 April 2011@10:58:42.
Catharine Roth (raised status) on 20 April 2011@17:32:46.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 28 December 2014@05:36:45.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 December 2014@10:42:30.

Headword: Abusson
Adler number: alpha,104
Translated headword: abyss
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] that which not even a deep [buqo/s] can contain; but Ionians pronounce buqo/s as busso/s.[1]
From which also bussodomeu/ein ["to build in the deep"] appears to be said,[2] from the verb du/nw ["I sink"] [meaning] I enter upon secretly, with a change [of initial consonant] [giving] bu/w, bu/sw, be/busmai, be/busai, [and the nouns] buso/s and a)bu/ssos [meaning] where no-one enters because of its depth.[3]
Aristophanes in Frogs [writes]: "for immediately you will come to a huge lake, an absolute abyss."[4] And he also uses the word in the neuter: "they shall not make peace while the measureless [a)/busson] silver is with the goddess on the Acropolis." For 1,000 talents were stored on the Acropolis.[5]
"Abyss" is what the Holy Scripture calls the watery substance. So since the land is surrounded on all sides by waters [and] by great and small seas, David naturally called this [i.e., abyss] the earth's surrounding garment.[6] Also, "abyss calls to abyss", the same prophet says,[7] meaning figuratively military divisions and the excessive size of the multitude.[8]
"I was under water as [if] in a kind of abyss."[9]
So an abyss [is] a great amount of water.
Greek Original:
Abusson: hên oude buthos chôrêsai dunatai: Iônes de ton buthon busson phasin. hothen dokei legesthai kai bussodomeuein, para to dunô, to hupeiserchomai, kata tropên buô, busô, bebusmai, bebusai, busos kai abussos, hou oudeis eiserchetai dia to bathos. Aristophanês Batrachois: euthus gar epi limnên megalên hêxeis panu abusson. kai oudeterôs phêsin ho autos: heôs an êi to argurion to abusson para têi theôi, ouk eirêneusousin. en gar têi akropolei chilia talanta apekeito. Abusson kalei tên hugran ousian hê theia graphê. epei oun hê gê pantachothen hudasi periechetai megalois kai mikrois pelagesin, eikotôs peribolaion autês eirêken ho Dabid. kai, abussos abusson epikaleitai, ho autos prophêtês phêsin: ta stratiôtika legôn tagmata kai tên tou plêthous huperbolên tropikôs. hôs en abussôi tini hupobruchios egenomên. Abussos oun hudatôn plêthos polu.
Notes:
See also alpha 105.
[1] This comment on Ionian pronunciation comes from the scholiast on Aristophanes, Frogs 138, quoted later in the entry.
[2] In Homer, Odyssey, where bussodomeu/w occurs most frequently, it has the sense "brood over."
[3] cf. Etymologicum Magnum 4.44. These are principal parts of the verb bu/w, which means "to stuff," followed by buso/s, which does not exist according to LSJ. Probably this is a mistake for busso/s, "depth of the sea" (cf. beta 598, busso/n). The Suda generally has little concern for the distinction between single and double consonants. The author thus seems to propose a very dubious etymology: that a)-bussos literally means "unstuffable" -- i.e., unable to be entered. [Ms M (= Marcianus 448) omits this sentence.]
[4] Aristophanes, Frogs 137-8 (web address 1).
[5] "Silver" [a)rgu/rion] is a neuter noun in Greek, while lake [li/mnh] in the previous sentence is feminine; the point is that the same form a)/busson is used with both. The sentence quoted here is actually part of a scholion to Aristophanes, Lysistrata 173 (web address 2); Aristophanes uses the phrase to\ a)rgu/rion to\ a)/busson in that line itself.
[6] Psalm 103:6 LXX. See again under pi 1083.
[7] Psalm 41:8 LXX.
[8] Referring to the continuation of Psalm 41:8 LXX, "all thy waves and thy billows are gone over me" (KJV).
[9] From Theodoret's commentary (PG 80.1173) on Psalm 41:8 LXX.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: Christianity; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; epic; geography; history; imagery; military affairs; proverbs; religion
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:02:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, added keywords, set status) on 5 February 2001@11:48:31.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@08:11:37.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 4 July 2003@08:14:49.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added links; cosmetics) on 14 December 2003@15:22:17.
David Whitehead (modified translation and notes 6-9) on 28 April 2004@11:16:41.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@00:15:00.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 19 April 2011@18:23:25.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 25 April 2011@04:11:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and note, after consulting with the translator) on 26 April 2011@17:14:37.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@03:45:27.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 21 November 2014@10:58:29.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 21 November 2014@11:44:30.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:36:21.

Headword: Agathê kai maza met' arton
Adler number: alpha,110

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