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Headword: Abel
Adler number: alpha,30
Translated headword: Abel
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Son of Adam.[1] This man was chaste and just from the beginning and a shepherd of flocks; out of these he offered a sacrifice to God and was accepted, but was then killed because he was envied by his brother Cain.[2] Cain happened to be a farmer and after the judgement he lived worse, with groaning and trembling. For Abel, by dedicating the firstborn [of the flock] to God, recommended himself as more God-loving than self-loving,[3] and because this was a good choice, he was accepted. But Cain impiously kept his first-fruits for himself and gave the seconds to God, and for this reason was rightly rejected. For it says: "and after some days it happened that Cain offered from the fruits of the earth."[4] Cain was disgraced by the fact that the produce he offered was not the first-fruits but that which was some days old and second-best.
Greek Original:
Abel: huios Adam. houtos parthenos kai dikaios hupêrche kai poimên probatôn: ex hôn kai thusian tôi theôi prosagagôn kai dechtheis anaireitai, phthonêtheis hupo tou adelphou autou Kaïn. ho Kaïn de geôrgos tunchanôn kai meta tên dikên cheironôs biôsas stenôn kai tremôn ên. ho gar Abel ta prôtotoka tôi theôi kathierôn philotheon mallon ê philauton heauton sunistê, hothen kai dia tês agathês autou proaireseôs apedechthê. ho de Kaïn dussebôs heautôi aponemôn ta prôtogennêmata, theôi de ta deutera, eikotôs kai apeblêthê. phêsi gar: kai egeneto meth' hêmeras, prosênenke Kaïn apo tôn karpôn tês gês. hôste dia touto Kaïn elenchetai, hoti mê ta akrothinia gennêmata prosênenke tôi theôi, alla ta meth' hêmeras kai deutera.
Notes:
George the Monk, Chronicon 6.10-7.16.
[1] alpha 425.
[2] kappa 27.
[3] Again at sigma 1580.
[4] Genesis 4:3.
Keywords: agriculture; biography; botany; Christianity; daily life; ethics; food; historiography; religion; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:57:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, keywords, set status) on 27 January 2001@12:23:00.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 27 February 2003@08:28:31.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 8 September 2003@06:15:32.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 October 2005@10:57:50.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics; raised status) on 22 June 2011@07:14:12.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 29 August 2012@10:24:09.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@01:03:34.

Headword: Abios
Adler number: alpha,47
Translated headword: full-lived
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Antiphon has a)/bion for one who has acquired a good living.[1] Similarly Homer has a)/culon for "full of timber."[2]
Greek Original:
Abios: Antiphôn ton abion epi tou polun ton bion tattei kektêmenou. hôsper kai Homêros to axulon anti tou poluxulon.
Notes:
= Harpocration s.v. (A2 Keaney).
The point is that the alpha prefix intensifies, rather than negates as it usually does: LSJ entries for a)/bios (A) and (B) at web address 1. On the different alpha prefixes, see LSJ.
[1] Antiphon (the sophist) B87 F43 Diels-Kranz.
[2] Homer, Iliad 11.155 (web address 2): e)n a)cu/lw|... u(/lh|, of a forest fire falling in "a wood with much dead timber," and thus spreading rapidly. On the meaning of this adjective see Lexikon des frühgriechischen Epos I (fasc. 6, 1969) 974-75. (Although LSJ correctly defines cu/lon as 'timber', the entry there for a)/culos erroneously assumes alpha privative and is misleading.)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: botany; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@18:59:58.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added note.) on 30 July 2000@22:59:00.
David Whitehead (added note) on 9 October 2000@06:48:14.
Catharine Roth (added link) on 4 September 2001@23:26:33.
Robert Dyer (Corrected error in note 2 (and corresponding translation) arising from a mistranslation in LSJ. Raised status, added keywords) on 6 May 2002@18:17:20.
Robert Dyer (Cosmetics) on 6 May 2002@18:20:58.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 23 March 2008@14:30:04.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 23 March 2008@20:07:24.
David Whitehead (augmented notes) on 24 March 2008@05:13:43.
Jennifer Benedict (fixed my betacode typo) on 25 March 2008@11:20:15.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, deleted link) on 17 November 2009@15:29:14.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 8 August 2013@00:38:05.

Headword: Abrotonon
Adler number: alpha,95
Translated headword: wormwood
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Type of plant.
Greek Original:
Abrotonon: eidos botanês.
Notes:
Wormwood, or other Artemisia species; see e.g. Theophrastus Enquiry into Plants 6.7.3.
(Also a woman's name in New Comedy.)
Keywords: botany; comedy; definition; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:45:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, set status) on 1 February 2001@22:41:01.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 3 January 2005@10:48:59.
David Whitehead on 21 December 2011@06:29:50.
Catharine Roth (expanded abbreviation) on 24 November 2014@19:45:34.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 25 November 2014@23:07:45.

Headword: Aburtakê
Adler number: alpha,103
Translated headword: sour-sauce, aburtake, abyrtake, abyrtace
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A sharp-flavored barbarian dish, prepared from leeks and cress[-seeds] and pomegranate kernels and other such things, quite clearly pungent. Theopompus in Theseus [writes]: "he will reach the land of the Medes, where aburtake is made mostly of cress and leeks."[1] The noun also appears in the Kekruphalos of Menander.[2]
Greek Original:
Aburtakê: hupotrimma barbarikon, kataskeuazomenon dia prasôn kai kardamôn kai rhoas kokkôn kai heterôn toioutôn, drimu dêlonoti. Theopompos Thêsei: hêxei de Mêdôn gaian, entha kardamôn pleistôn poieitai kai prasôn aburtakê. esti kai en Kekruphalôi Menandrou tounoma.
Notes:
[1] Theopompus fr. 17 Kock, now 18 Kassel-Austin. In the long list of food allowances for the Persian Kings (allegedly seen in Babylon by Alexander the Great) in Polyaenus 4.3.32 there is a mention of salted capers "from which they make abyrtakai".
[2] Menander fr. 280 Kock, 247 Koerte, now 217 Kassel-Austin. For other appearances of the word in comedy see LSJ s.v. at web address 1 below.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: botany; comedy; food; geography
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:00:55.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, added keywords, set status) on 5 February 2001@11:10:09.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes; cosmetics) on 6 February 2001@03:24:05.
David Whitehead (modified translation) on 14 July 2006@03:15:01.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:07:25.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and link) on 19 April 2011@10:58:42.
Catharine Roth (raised status) on 20 April 2011@17:32:46.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 28 December 2014@05:36:45.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 December 2014@10:42:30.

Headword: Aganon
Adler number: alpha,145
Translated headword: firewood, broken; good, gentle
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
With proparoxytone accent[1] [this means] wood that has been cut up.
Or brushwood and [wood that is] ready to be cut up.[2]
But some [sc. define it as wood] which is not chopped.
But with the oxytone[3] it means fine. Or good or kindly, though some [say] immortal. Whence also [comes the term] a)ganofrosu/nh ["kindly-mindedness"].
Also [sc. attested is the verb] a)ganou=men ["we will make nice"],[4] meaning we will beautify.
And elsewhere: "however gentle you might pass into the Athenian book of death, you would always have your tresses well-garlanded."[5]
Greek Original:
Aganon: proparoxutonôs to kateagos xulon. ê to phruganôdes kai hetoimon pros to kateagênai. hoi de to apelekêton. Aganon de oxutonôs kalon. ê agathon ê hilaron, hoi de athanaton. enthen kai aganophrosunê. kai Aganoumen, anti tou kosmêsomen. kai authis: hôs an toi rheiêi men aganos Atthidi deltôi kêros, hupo stephanois d' aien echois plokamous.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 146, alpha 147, alpha 148, alpha 149.
[1] i.e. a)/ganos (here neuter).
[2] Addendum lacking in mss ASM.
[3] i.e. a)gano/s (again, here neuter).
[4] Attested only here, but cf. the scholia to Aristophanes, Peace 398 (where a)galou=men occurs).
[5] Greek Anthology 7.36.5 (Erucius), on the tomb of Sophocles; cf. Gow and Page (252-253), alpha 1421, beta 453, and sigma 569.
Reference:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: botany; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@23:57:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@11:07:52.
Jennifer Benedict (tags) on 26 March 2008@01:08:32.
David Whitehead (augmented n.4; more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:01:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@05:41:50.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.5, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keyword) on 25 October 2018@15:42:25.

Headword: Agelaia staphulê
Adler number: alpha,184
Translated headword: ordinary bunch of grapes
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the cheap [sort].[1]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gelai=a ["ordinary things"],[2] [meaning] those with no distinction.
Greek Original:
Agelaia staphulê: hê eutelês. kai Agelaia, ta ou gennaia.
Notes:
cf. alpha 186, alpha 187, alpha 188, alpha 189.
[1] The headword phrase is presumably quoted from somewhere; as presented here, its adjective is in the feminine nominative singular.
[2] Same adjective but in the neuter nominative/accusative plural.
Keywords: botany; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 7 June 1999@11:35:43.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword; added keyword; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@09:59:59.
Catharine Roth (added betacode and notes, raised status) on 14 October 2007@01:44:53.
Catharine Roth (added cross-references) on 14 October 2007@01:46:53.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 14 October 2007@03:28:00.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 29 December 2011@06:41:42.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 5 April 2015@10:25:10.

Headword: Hagisteias
Adler number: alpha,242
Translated headword: rituals
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning those] of holiness, of cleansing, of service.
Greek Original:
Hagisteias: hagiôsunês, katharotêtos, latreias.
Notes:
LSJ entry at web address 1; and cf. generally alpha 234.
Same material in other lexica (references at Photius alpha176 Theodoridis), and also in the scholia to Plato, Axiochus 371D, where the headword -- accusative plural, not genitive singular -- occurs.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; philosophy; religion
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@14:18:45.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added headword translation, note, keywords, and link.) on 18 February 2001@20:06:16.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note and keyword) on 9 June 2003@09:51:41.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 4 January 2012@04:55:36.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@07:55:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 November 2020@00:51:21.

Headword: Ankesi
Adler number: alpha,245
Translated headword: [in] forests
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning in] tree-filled and wooded places.[1]
In the Epigrams: "with this he slays wild beasts in beast-breeding forests".[2]
Greek Original:
Ankesi: sundendrois kai hulôdesi topois. en Epigrammasi: thêrobolei toutôi d' ankesi thêrotokois.
Notes:
The headword is dative plural of alpha 248. It is perhaps extracted from the quotation given, though not demonstrably so; there are other extant possibilities in e.g. Theocritus and Oppian.
[1] For this glossing cf. the scholia to Homer, Iliad 18.321, where a)/gke' occurs.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.186.4 (Diocles), dedications to Pan by three brothers; cf. Gow and Page (230-231).
Reference:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: botany; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry; religion; zoology
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@14:04:48.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headword, notes, keywords; cosmetics) on 12 February 2001@04:42:05.
Catharine Roth (Added cross-reference.) on 4 March 2001@22:35:12.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@05:13:03.
David Whitehead (expanded note; cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@07:42:49.
David Whitehead (coding) on 7 July 2015@02:50:08.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.2, added bibliography, added keyword) on 2 November 2018@18:01:43.

Headword: Ankura ploiou
Adler number: alpha,256

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