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Headword: Abasanistos
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
Abasanistos: agumnastos ê anexetastos, adokimastos. eirêtai de apo tês basanou tês chrusochoïkês lithou, en hêi dokimazousi to chrusion. echrêsato de Ailianos en tôi peri pronoias tôi abasanistos anti tou aneu odunês.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] ba/sanos can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.

Headword: Agalmata
Adler number: alpha,133
Translated headword: delights, ornaments, statues
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the likenesses of the gods, and anything that is decorative in some way. Homer [writes]: "but it is stored away as a delight for the king."[1] And Hesiod calls a necklace an "ornament";[2] but Pindar uses this term for the decoration on a tomb,[3] and Euripides uses it for the adornments for corpses.[4]
Also something in which someone takes delight.[5]
Also [sc. a term for] image, wooden statue, delight, beauty, ornament, source of pride, palm leaves,[6] [human] statues, [honorific?] inscriptions.
Paintings and [human] statues are also called agalmata.[7]
agalmation [is] the diminutive form.
Greek Original:
Agalmata: ta tôn theôn mimêmata, kai panta ta kosmou tinos metechonta. Homêros: basilêï de keitai agalma. kai Hêsiodos ton hormon agalma kalei: Pindaros de tên epi taphou stêlên houtô kalei, Euripidês ton epi nekrois kosmon. kai eph' hôi tis agalletai. kai to eidôlon, bretas, charma, kallonê, kosmos, kauchêma, thalloi, andriantes, epigraphai. Agalmata de kai tas graphas kai tous andriantas legousin. Agalmation de hupokoristikôs.
Notes:
The (neuter) headword is the plural of alpha 131 (and cf. alpha 132). It is perhaps, though not necessarily, quoted from somewhere.
[1] Homer, Iliad 4.144 (web address 1), on an ivory cheek-piece for a horse.
[2] This fragment of Hesiod (142 Merkelbach-West, 233 Rzach) is not known from any other source. It may pertain to the story of Europa in the Catalogue of Women.
[3] Pindar, Nemean Odes 10.125 (67 Bowra): web address 2.
[4] Euripides, Alcestis 613: web address 3.
[5] Already at alpha 131.
[6] Used as prizes for victors in competition.
[7] Same material in Photius (Lexicon alpha92 Theodoridis) and elsewhere; cf. Kassel-Austin, PCG II p.365 (on Antiphanes fr.102).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: art history; athletics; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; poetry; religion; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 12 January 1999@12:39:04.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (cosmetics) on 29 June 2000@22:39:50.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 17 February 2003@05:54:38.
Jennifer Benedict (cleaned up links) on 26 March 2008@01:00:28.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:07:43.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7) on 16 August 2013@07:56:54.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7; another keyword) on 22 December 2014@04:58:33.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 6 November 2016@12:23:04.

Headword: Hagisteias
Adler number: alpha,242
Translated headword: rituals
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning those] of holiness, of cleansing, of service.
Greek Original:
Hagisteias: hagiôsunês, katharotêtos, latreias.
Notes:
LSJ entry at web address 1; and cf. generally alpha 234.
Same material in other lexica (references at Photius alpha176 Theodoridis), and also in the scholia to Plato, Axiochus 371D, where the headword -- accusative plural, not genitive singular -- occurs.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; philosophy; religion
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@14:18:45.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added headword translation, note, keywords, and link.) on 18 February 2001@20:06:16.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note and keyword) on 9 June 2003@09:51:41.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 4 January 2012@04:55:36.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@07:55:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 November 2020@00:51:21.

Headword: Ankurisma
Adler number: alpha,261
Translated headword: anchor-hold
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] a kind of wrestling-move. Also [sc. attested is the related participle] a)gkuri/sas, meaning [someone] wrestling down or taking down by the knee. An 'anchor-hold' is also a hunter's container of figs.[1] Aristophanes [writes]: "striking, anchoring, then turning his shoulder, you swallowed him up."[2] That is, you smote [him].
Greek Original:
Ankurisma: eidos palaismatos. kai Ankurisas, anti tou katapalaisas ê têi ankulêi katabalôn. esti de ankurisma kai skeuos agreutikon sukôn. Aristophanês: diabalôn, ankurisas, eit' apostrepsas ton ômon, auton ekolabêsas. toutesti prosekrousas.
Notes:
[1] This meaning is not attested in LSJ (web address 1 below). Perhaps it stems from a misunderstanding of the Aristophanes passage about to be quoted, where in addition to applying the anchor-hold, Kleon is charged with squeezing treasury officials like ripe figs.
[2] Aristophanes, Knights 262-3 (web address 2), with comment from the scholia there.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: athletics; botany; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food; history; imagery
Translated by: Roger Travis on 4 October 2000@12:34:39.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, added note and link to LSJ, added keywords, set status) on 18 June 2001@01:28:37.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added keyword; restorative and other cosmetics) on 4 May 2003@07:28:30.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@09:01:44.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@07:58:17.

Headword: Agos
Adler number: alpha,314
Translated headword: pollution, leader
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Pollution, or elbow.[1] What is honourable and worthy of reverence is also called agos; hence priesthoods [are called] all-holy [panageis], and a number of other things.[2]
Thucydides [writes]: "the Spartans sent envoys to Athens demanding the expulsion of the goddess's curse [agos]. It was that against Cylon, the ancient Athenian Olympic victor. [...] And they banished the accursed [enageis]."[3]
But agos when oxytone [means] leader.[4]
Greek Original:
Agos: miasma, ê ankôn. legetai de agos kai to timion kai axion sebasmatos, ex hou kai hai hiereiai panageis, kai alla tina. Thoukudidês: pempsantes hoi Lakedaimonioi presbeis ekeleuon tous Athênaious to agos elaunein tês theou. ên de to kata Kulôna ton Olumpionikên ton Athênaion ton palai. kai êlasan tous enageis. Agos de oxutonôs ho hêgemôn.
Notes:
The opening material here is also in Photius and other lexica.
[1] The second gloss here is a mistake (perhaps by confusion with the following entry, where the same word, a)gkw/n, is translated 'embrace').
[2] An a)/gos is "any matter of religious awe": LSJ s.v.; see also pi 150.
[3] Thucydides 1.126.2-12 (web address 1), here so drastically abridged as to be misleading. (This banishment was part of the events of 632 BCE, now relevant two centuries later in the build-up to the Peloponnesian War. The original 'accursed' had returned -- and nobody was banished in 432.)
[4] From Philoponus, Differences. (For this epic/poetic noun see LSJ s.v.)
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: athletics; biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; politics; religion
Translated by: Malcolm Heath on 7 July 1999@10:54:13.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered headword, cosmetics, raised status) on 21 October 2000@16:02:46.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2003@08:40:55.
Catharine Roth (tweaked notes, added cross-reference and link) on 23 April 2008@15:19:18.
David Whitehead (expanded notes; more keywords; cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@04:34:35.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 6 January 2012@12:22:26.

Headword: Agôn
Adler number: alpha,327
Translated headword: contest, training, arena
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Training with a view to competitions.[1] [sc. Also attested is the accusative case] a)gw=na; and Homer [sc. uses this term for] the actual place where the competition takes place.[2] Thucydides in [book] 5 [writes]: "he came into the arena and garlanded the charioteer."[3]
Greek Original:
Agôn: hê pros tous agônas askêsis. Agôna: kai Homêros ton topon auton en hôi agônizontai. Thoukudidês pemptêi: proelthôn es ton agôna anedêse ton hêniochon.
Notes:
Apart from the initial glossing (on which see next note), this material also occurs in Photius, Lexicon alpha316 Theodoridis.
[1] The word used for 'competitions' here is the (accusative) plural of the headword itself. The Suda seems therefore to be saying, indirectly, that the word denotes both competition and the training for it.
[2] i.e. the arena. Adler cites Homer, Iliad 23.273 for this; Theodoridis chooses Odyssey 8.260. For instances in other authors (including the one about to be quoted here) see LSJ s.v. a)gw/n I.2.
[3] Thucydides 5.50.4, on Lichas the Spartan.
Keywords: athletics; biography; botany; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; historiography; history
Translated by: Malcolm Heath on 7 July 1999@11:00:05.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered headword, augmented notes.) on 24 October 2000@11:56:35.
William Hutton (Corrected my own error, raised status.) on 24 October 2000@11:57:26.
William Hutton on 24 October 2000@21:20:16.
David Whitehead (cosmetics in footnote 1) on 25 October 2000@03:07:38.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords) on 9 February 2003@09:01:04.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@06:26:01.
David Whitehead on 19 August 2013@04:21:37.

Headword: Agônarchai
Adler number: alpha,328
Translated headword: contest-judges
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Sophocles [writes]: "and lest any contest-judges or he who is my destroyer should give my arms to the Achaeans."[1]
Also [sc. attested is] a proverb: "a contest does not accept excuses."[2] It is applied to those who have not profited at all if they made excuses.
Also [sc. attested is] "a contest does not wait for a pretext."[3] The proverb [is used] in reference to those who are by nature lazy and neglectful; alternatively to those who do not believe the words of those making pretexts.
Greek Original:
Agônarchai: Sophoklês: kai tama teuchê mêt' agônarchai tines thêsous' Achaiois mêth' ho lumeôn emos. kai paroimia: Agôn ou dechetai skêpseis. tattetai epi tôn mêden oninamenôn ei skêpsainto. kai Agôn prophasin ouk anamenei. hê paroimia epi tôn phusei rhaithumôn kai amelôn: ê epi tôn mê prosiemenôn tous logous tôn prophasizomenôn.
Notes:
[1] Sophocles, Ajax 572-3 (web address 1 below); again at lambda 839.
[2] (Also in the paroemiographers, e.g. Apostolius 1.25.) Possibly Contest, the divine personification of the agon (cf. Pausanias 5.26.3), though the apparently personifying language does not guarantee this. See further, next note.
[3] Used in Plato, Cratylus 421D (where a scholiast cited Aristophanes fr. 321 Kock as an earlier attestation of it) and Laws 751D. Also in the paroemiographers, e.g. Gregorius 1.11.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: athletics; comedy; daily life; ethics; philosophy; proverbs; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 18 March 2001@14:50:17.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented and modified notes; added keywords) on 19 March 2001@04:07:49.
Jennifer Benedict (Updated link to Perseus) on 11 March 2008@23:49:24.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 12 March 2008@04:23:38.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@06:29:38.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 January 2012@12:38:35.
David Whitehead (typo) on 16 June 2013@10:53:36.

Headword: Agônioumenoi
Adler number: alpha,333
Translated headword: about to be contenders
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning they who are] about to enter contests.
"About to be contenders, they might not avert their enemies without a fight."[1]
Greek Original:
Agônioumenoi: eis agônas embalountes. tous polemious agônioumenoi apotrapointo amachei.
Notes:
The headword is future participle, masculine nominative plural, of the verb a)gwni/zomai. It is perhaps extracted from the quotation given, though not demonstrably so, and there are plenty of alternatives (beginning with Thucydides, Xenophon and Plato).
[1] Quotation unidentifiable, but evidently from (or connected with) a war narrative. This brings out the point that the verb in question has military as well as athletic overtones.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; imagery; military affairs; philosophy
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 16 March 2001@10:31:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 17 March 2001@05:08:28.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 20 February 2011@09:20:32.
David Whitehead on 6 January 2012@06:46:52.
David Whitehead (augmented primary note; cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@09:20:03.

Headword: Agônisma
Adler number: alpha,336
Translated headword: achievement, prize
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] effort, diligence.[1]
"An achievement is there for him to take".[2]
Aristophanes [writes]: "personally, I would like to meet some ("wild beast" is left out) and take an achievement worthy of the journey."[3]
A prize.
Greek Original:
Agônisma: spoudên, epimeleian. agônisma tithetai sullabein auton. Aristophanês: egô d' euxaimên an entuchein tini [leipei thêriôi] labein t' agônism' axion ti tês hodou. epathlon.
Notes:
[1] This glossing shows that the headword, a neuter noun, is in the accusative case, and thus extracted from somewhere other than the quotation about to be given (where it is nominative).
[2] Quotation (also in the Lexicon Vindobonense) unidentifiable.
[3] Aristophanes, Frogs 283-4 (web address 1 below). For the sense of a)gw/nisma here (both a struggle and its reward) Dover ad loc. compares Thucydides 7.59.2 (web address 2 below).
Reference:
Aristophanes, Frogs, edited with introduction and commentary by K.J. Dover (Oxford 1993)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: athletics; biography; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; imagery; zoology
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 20 March 2001@15:31:38.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword; completed translation; modified and augmented notes) on 21 March 2001@03:27:33.
Jennifer Benedict (Added links) on 11 March 2008@23:57:53.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@06:57:04.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 March 2015@00:44:32.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 9 April 2015@09:33:56.

Headword: Agônothetês
Adler number: alpha,338

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