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Headword: Περίστασις
Adler number: pi,1295
Translated headword: circumstance, display, stature, station, tense situation
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Polybius [writes:] "but [Aemilia] made a practice of participating in the women's processions with a magnificent display."[1]
And elsewhere: "[he was] in terms of reputation and situation of life second to none amongst the Iberians, but as regards goodwill and fidelity toward [the] Carthaginians appearing to stand out by far from the rest."[2] ['Situation'] meaning emphasis.[3]
And elsewhere Polybius [writes]: "through the tense situation, when Xanthippus' remarks were quickly spread to the populace as a whole and to the generals, the generals resolved to recall him and take in his report."[4]
And elsewhere: "but through the urgency of the herald's proclamation he/she/it awoke."[5] Meaning emphasis.[6]
Greek Original:
Περίστασις. Πολύβιος: συνέβαινε δὲ μεγαλομερῆ τὴν περίστασιν ἔχειν ἐν ταῖς γυναικείαις ἐξόδοις. καὶ αὖθις: ὁ δὲ κατὰ μὲν τὴν δόξαν καὶ τὴν τοῦ βίου περίστασιν οὐδενὸς δεύτερος Ἰβήρων, κατὰ δὲ τὴν πρὸς Καρχηδόνα εὔνοιαν καὶ πίστιν πολύ τι διαφέρειν δοκῶν τῶν ἄλλων. ἀντὶ τοῦ ἐπίτασις. καὶ αὖθις Πολύβιος: ταχὺ δὲ διὰ τὴν περίστασιν τῶν τοῦ Ξανθίππου λόγων διαδοθέντων εἰς τὰ πλήθη καὶ τοὺς στρατηγούς, ἔγνωσαν οἱ στρατηγοὶ ἀνακαλεῖσθαι καὶ πεῖραν αὐτοῦ λαμβάνειν. καὶ ἀλλαχοῦ: διὰ δὲ τὴν περίστασιν τοῦ κήρυκος φωνήσαντος ἀνέστη. ἀντὶ τοῦ ἐπίτασιν.
Notes:
The headword is a feminine noun in the nominative singular; cf. pi 1296 (accusative) and see generally LSJ s.v. It is not initially glossed, but its appearance in the second and fourth of the illustrative quotations (in the accusative case) is: see nn.3 and 6 below.
[1] Polybius 31.26.3 (web address 1), describing the lavish public appearances of Aemilia Tertia (d. 163/2 BCE; cf. alphaiota 198; alpha 3167; pi 1186; Walbank, vol. III, pp. 503-4), the wife of Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus (236-183; OCD(4) s.v.; pi 2054; Walbank, vol. II, pp. 191ff.).
[2] Polybius 3.98.2 (web address 2), telling the story of the Spaniard Abilyx (Abelos, Abelux, Abelox), who in 217 BCE opportunistically switched his allegiance from Carthage to Rome, tricked the Carthaginians into releasing Iberian hostages, and then delivered the hostages into Roman custody (Walbank, vol. I, pp. 430-2).
[3] This glossing term ἐπίτασις , a feminine noun, means a stretching or, in context, an intensity of style: see generally LSJ s.v. Its appearance at this point in the entry in the nominative case (contrast n.6 below) is anomalous, and Adler's apparatus notes the responses -- transpose or delete -- of previous editors.
[4] Xanthippus (fl. ca. 250 BCE) was a Lakedaimonian military leader and a mercenary in Carthaginian service during the First Punic War (264-241). Here Polybius 1.32.3 (web address 3) describes the Spartan's harsh critique of Carthaginian defenders at the battle of Adys (a significant town near Carthage, its precise location unknown, perhaps Uthina (Barrington Atlas map 32 grid F3); Lazenby, pp. 100-1; Tipps, p. 378) in 255 BCE; cf. alpha 3401.
[5] Quotation unidentifiable.
[6] A repetition of the gloss in n.3 above, but now in the accusative (of respect; cf. Smyth 1600-1).
References:
F.W. Walbank, A Historical Commentary on Polybius, vol. III, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1979
F.W. Walbank, A Historical Commentary on Polybius, vol. II, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1967
F.W. Walbank, A Historical Commentary on Polybius, vol. I, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957
J.F. Lazenby, The First Punic War: A Military History, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1996
G.K. Tipps, 'The defeat of Regulus,' The Classical World, vol. 96, no. 4, Summer 2003, pp. 375-85
H.W. Smyth, Greek Grammar, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1956
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; ethics; food; geography; historiography; history; imagery; military affairs; politics; women
Translated by: Ronald Allen on 23 June 2011@01:51:34.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 June 2011@03:40:23.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaking) on 29 September 2013@06:50:56.
David Whitehead on 10 August 2014@05:00:57.

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