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Headword: Ληρεῖς
Adler number: lambda,467
Translated headword: you are babbling
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] you are chattering.[1] Aristophanes [writes]: "what on earth are you babbling about? It's as if you've fallen off a donkey!"[2] They also say: "off the top of your head."[3] And elsewhere: "you are babbling babble".[4] Meaning after the fashion of babble. The phrase and the construction [is] Attic, like you are raging a rage. It is an Attic construction, to attach the verb about the thing with the [noun] expressing the thing, as in to outrage an outrage or to flee a flight.[5]
Greek Original:
Ληρεῖς: φλυαρεῖς. Ἀριστοφάνης: τί δῆτα ληρεῖς, ὥσπερ ἀπ' ὄνου καταπεσών; λέγεται καὶ ἀπὸ νοῦ. καὶ αὖθις: λῆρον ληρεῖς. ἀντὶ τοῦ κατὰ λῆρον. Ἀττικὴ δὲ ἡ φράσις καὶ τὸ σχῆμα, ὡς τό, μανίαν μαίνῃ. ἔστι δὲ Ἀττικὸν τὸ σχῆμα, τὸ εἰπόντα τὸ πρᾶγμα ἐπαγαγεῖν τὸ ἀπὸ τοῦ πράγματος ῥῆμα, ὡς τό, ὕβριν ὑβρίζεις, καί, φυγὴν φεύγεις.
Notes:
cf. alpha 3459, lambda 468.
[1] From the scholia to Aristophanes, Plutus [Wealth] 517, where the phrase λῆρον ληρεῖς occurs; see at n.4 below.
[2] Aristophanes, Clouds 1273.
[3] As a variant reading of "off a donkey" (ἀπὸ τοῦ νοῦ for ἀπ' ὄνου .) Noted in the scholia ad loc.
[4] Aristophanes, Plutus 517.
[5] Paraphrased from the scholia ad loc. This is the figura etymologica, which was common in Greek, particularly Homeric Greek.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; imagery; rhetoric; zoology
Translated by: Nick Nicholas on 4 April 2009@22:19:16.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (more notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 5 April 2009@04:56:50.
David Whitehead on 18 April 2013@05:58:16.

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