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Headword: Χαλαζᾷ
Adler number: chi,6
Translated headword: is hailing
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
i.e. is loose. "If he is hailing in the arse".[1] But this is a disease of animals, which escapes notice while they are living, but becomes apparent when they are dead and cut up. The "hailstone"[2] is mixed up and grown into their flesh. Butchers usually open the mouths of pigs with a peg after slaughter to determine whether they have hailstones.[3] Hailstone is entirely a disease of pigs.
Greek Original:
Χαλαζᾷ: ἤτοι χαλαρός ἐστι. τὸν πρωκτὸν εἰ χαλαζᾷ. νόσημα δέ ἐστι τοῦτο τῶν θρεμμάτων, ὅπερ ζώντων μὲν λανθάνει, ἀποθανόντων δὲ καὶ τεμνομένων φανερὸν γίνεται. ταῖς σαρξὶ δὲ αὐτῶν ἀναμέμικται καὶ ἐμπέφυκεν ἡ χάλαζα. εἰώθασι δὲ οἱ μάγειροι πασσάλῳ τὰ τῶν χοίρων ἀνοίγειν στόματα μετὰ τὴν σφαγὴν καὶ κατανοεῖν, εἰ χαλαζῶσι. χάλαζα δέ ἐστι πάθος πᾶν χοίρων.
Notes:
The headword verb is extracted from the quotation given.
[1] Aristophanes, Knights 381, with comment from a scholiast there. But its author is probably incorrect in his interpretation of Aristophanes: the passage more probably refers to the disease detailed here, immediately below (so LSJ).
[2] i.e. tubercles or pimples.
[3] Aristotle, History of Animals 603b16-23, reports that these pimples appeared primarily on the underside of the tongue; numerous pimples indicated a watery and loose flesh.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; medicine; zoology
Translated by: Roger Travis on 22 June 1999@15:37:34.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 29 December 1999@21:26:13.
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@21:15:09.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 23 November 2001@04:10:58.
David Whitehead on 7 November 2013@04:54:45.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 26 November 2014@00:38:13.

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