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Headword: Habros
Adler number: alpha,87
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] bright, delicate, tender.[1]
In the Epigrams: "a cicada sat above a cithara delicately murmuring."[2]
"All the same that fellow is dainty and delicate and weakened by the softness of his body and depraved and with his hair done up like the most licentious little courtesans. And when he goes in to see the king his face and his curly hair are always delicately dripping [with perfume], and he takes as much money from the communal difficulties as would satisfy even the legendary Midas."[3]
Greek Original:
Habros: lampros, trupheros, hapalos. en Epigrammasin: habron epitruzôn kitharas huper hezeto tettix. homôs de ho trupheros ekeinos kai habros kai hupo malakias tou sômatos kateagôs kai lelugismenos kai tas te komas anadoumenos, hôsper hai tôn hetairidôn aselgesterai, kai habrostages echôn aei to metôpon kai tous bostruchous, labôn chrusion ek tôn koinôn sumphorôn, hoson hikanon ên emplêsai kai ton ek tou muthou Midan, eiserrei pros ton basilea.
Notes:
For this adjective see already alpha alpha 73 and alpha 86, and again alpha 88.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha55 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.54.7 (Paulus Silentarius).
[3] Attributed by Hemsterhuys to Eunapius; again (in part) at alpha 1860.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; imagery; mythology; poetry; women; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:39:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@12:21:50.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:35:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 January 2006@10:26:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@04:35:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 December 2011@19:16:16.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:18:56.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:31:02.

Headword: Habrochitôn
Adler number: alpha,96
Translated headword: delicate-tunic'd
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] wearing delicate things.
Greek Original:
Habrochitôn: truphera phorôn.
Note:
Same entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha60 Theodoridis. The headword adjective bears this meaning in e.g. Greek Anthology 9.538; however, the word is first attested in Aeschylus, Persians 543, of beds (accusative plural: web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: clothing; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:45:35.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, set keywords and status) on 1 February 2001@22:44:01.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 27 February 2003@09:00:26.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, title tags) on 25 March 2008@12:02:09.
David Whitehead (expanded note; tweaks) on 21 December 2011@06:35:49.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:27:25.

Headword: Agelios
Adler number: alpha,195
Translated headword: Agelios, Agelius
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This man was bishop of Constantinople during the reign of Valens.[1] He lived an apostolic life, for he always went about unshod and wore only a single tunic, in observance of what the Gospel says.[2]
Greek Original:
Agelios: houtos epi Oualentos ên Kônstantinoupoleôs episkopos, bion apostolikon bious. anupodêtos gar diolou diêgen, heni te chitôni ekechrêto, to tou euangeliou phulattôn rhêton.
Notes:
See again under mu 207.
[1] Agelius was a Novatian, persecuted for accepting the homoousian doctrine. For the emperor Valens, see omicron 764.
[2] Socrates, Ecclesiastical History 4.9.3 (translation at web address 1).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; Christianity; chronology; clothing; ethics; geography; religion
Translated by: William Hutton on 11 April 2000@00:02:16.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added notes and link) on 4 March 2002@13:30:20.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:54:59.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 October 2005@07:11:09.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keyword, raised status) on 12 October 2007@23:02:42.
David Whitehead (another x-ref; another keyword) on 29 December 2011@07:30:01.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation) on 29 December 2011@12:11:37.

Headword: Ageirei
Adler number: alpha,211
Translated headword: collects
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning he/she/it] gathers.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the participle] "those who collect".[2] "For their manner was sacred and nothing like those who collect [alms?]."[3]
And elsewhere: "wishing to go undetected, he shaves his head and his beard and puts on an Egyptian mantle, the sort that the attendants of Isis wear, and shaking a sistrum and going from one city to the next, and collecting [alms] in the name of the goddess and gratefully accepting necessary sustenance, as a drug against hunger".[4]
Greek Original:
Ageirei: sunagei. kai Ageirousin. ho gar tropos hieros ên kai ouden eoikôs tois ageirousin. kai authis: ho de lathein thelôn xureitai tên kephalên kai to geneion, kai stolên Aiguptian analabôn, hên hoi tês Isidos therapeutêres êsthêntai, kai seistron episeiôn kai polin ek poleôs ameibôn, kai têi theôi ageirôn kai anankaias trophas, limou pharmaka, agapêtôs lambanôn.
Notes:
[1] Same or similar entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha140 Theodoridis. The headword must be quoted from somewhere.
[2] Dative plural a)gei/rousin, from the quotation which follows.
[3] Philostratus, Life of Apollonius of Tyana 4.39.
[4] Aelian fr.124c Domingo-Forasté (121 Hercher); see also pi 2900, sigma 293.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; ethics; food; geography; history; medicine; religion
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@13:45:00.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; cosmetics) on 23 October 2000@06:33:06.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 6 July 2003@08:27:20.
David Whitehead (x-refs) on 2 May 2004@06:06:23.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 7 February 2011@09:53:06.
David Whitehead on 2 January 2012@09:46:30.
Catharine Roth (updated reference in note 4) on 28 January 2012@19:31:10.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:49:31.

Headword: Hagisteias
Adler number: alpha,242
Translated headword: rituals
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning those] of holiness, of cleansing, of service.
Greek Original:
Hagisteias: hagiôsunês, katharotêtos, latreias.
Notes:
LSJ entry at web address 1; and cf. generally alpha 234.
Same material in other lexica (references at Photius alpha176 Theodoridis), and also in the scholia to Plato, Axiochus 371D, where the headword -- accusative plural, not genitive singular -- occurs.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; philosophy; religion
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@14:18:45.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added headword translation, note, keywords, and link.) on 18 February 2001@20:06:16.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note and keyword) on 9 June 2003@09:51:41.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 4 January 2012@04:55:36.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@07:55:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 November 2020@00:51:21.

Headword: Agnuthes
Adler number: alpha,289
Translated headword: loom-weights
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the stones of the loom.
Greek Original:
Agnuthes: hoi lithoi tou histou.
Notes:
Same or similar entry in some other lexica and grammars, though with the accentuation a)gnu=qes . The word does not seem to have an Indo-European etymology, and Chantraine s.v. suggests that it may be borrowed.
LSJ entry at web address 1.
References:
OCD(4) pp.1446-7 (s.v. "textile production", by J.P. Wild)
P. Chantraine, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque, ed. 2, Paris 2009
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: clothing; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; science and technology
Translated by: Catharine Roth on 26 February 2001@00:45:26.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added bibliography and keyword) on 26 February 2001@03:10:55.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@08:09:41.
Catharine Roth (expanded note) on 5 January 2012@19:23:13.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:41:33.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 July 2014@02:53:24.
Catharine Roth (added bibliography) on 4 August 2014@22:42:42.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 4 August 2014@22:44:38.

Headword: Angopênia
Adler number: alpha,298
Translated headword: angopenia
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the honeycombs of bees.[1]
That is, woven vessels; like xruseoph/nhta ["gold-woven"].[2]
Greek Original:
Angopênia: ta tôn melissôn kêria. toutestin angeia huphanta: hôs to chruseopênêta.
Notes:
[1] The headword, a single compound word in the Greek, is attested only in the Suda and, with the same glossing phrase, Hesychius alpha397; LSJ entry at web address 1. The second element of the compound could be related to ph=nos "web" and ph/nh "woof, bobbin-thread." The first part comes from a/ggos "vessel."
[2] For this adjective (attested in e.g. Euripides, Orestes 840) see LSJ s.v.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: clothing; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; trade and manufacture; tragedy; zoology
Translated by: Catharine Roth on 2 February 2001@20:59:41.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@06:54:04.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 5 January 2012@09:10:25.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 9 April 2015@08:53:36.

Headword: Agorazein
Adler number: alpha,300
Translated headword: to frequent the market-place; to market
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to buy something and to spend time in [the] marketplace.[1]
Aristophanes in Wealth [sc. applies this verb] to what we customarily [say] for to buy. "And to market a dress for his sisters."[2]
Greek Original:
Agorazein: to ôneisthai ti kai to en agorai diatribein. Aristophanês en Ploutôi epi tou sunêthôs hêmin anti tou ônêsasthai. kai tais adelphais agorasai chitônion.
Notes:
[1] Same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha227 Theodoridis. Denominative verb from a)gora/: LSJ entry at web address 1; cf. alpha 304 & alpha 305; also, for substance, alpha 299.
[2] Aristophanes, Plutus/Wealth 984 (web address 2), and scholia.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: clothing; comedy; daily life; definition; economics; trade and manufacture; women
Translated by: Catharine Roth on 2 February 2001@21:37:58.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@07:08:15.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@11:03:37.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, status) on 9 October 2005@16:15:08.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@09:20:06.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 5 January 2012@22:51:38.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:57:11.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 25 July 2014@20:53:58.

Headword: Agoranomias
Adler number: alpha,302
Translated headword: market-supervisorship, market-supervisorships
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] auditorship/s. The term is applied to those who oversee sales in the cities.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the related concrete noun] "market-supervisors" [agoranomoi]: the officials who manage the sales in the marketplace [sc. in Athens].[2]
Aristophanes in Acharnians [writes]: "as market-supervisors of the market I appoint the three who were chosen by lot, the thongs from Leprous."[3] That is, straps, whips. For in olden days the auditors of the marketplace used to beat people with whips. And "leprous" [leprou/s] some explain as [sc. wordplay] from the verb lepein, that is, "to beat"; others from Lepreon a small town of the Peloponnese which Callimachus also mentions in the Hymns: "citadel of Kaukones, which is called Lepreion."[4] Others still [sc. derive it] from mangy cattle, since the hides of mangy cattle are tough. Still others because the Megarians, with whom he[5] is making a treaty, have mangy bodies. But better to say that [sc. there is] a place called Leproi outside the [Athenian] town-center where the tanners' shops were. There is also a mention of this in Birds: "why then do you settle [in] Helian Lepreon."[6]
Also [sc. attested is the the verb] "I supervise markets" [a)goranomw=]; [used] with a genitive.
Greek Original:
Agoranomias: logistias. eirêtai de epi tôn episkopountôn ta tôn poleôn ônia. kai Agoranomoi, hoi ta kata tên agoran ônia dioikountes archontes. Aristophanês Acharneusin: agoranomous de tês agoras kathistamai treis tous lachontas, tous d' himantas ek leprôn. toutesti lôrous, phrangelia. to gar palaion phrangelois etupton hoi logistai tês agoras. leprôn de hoi men apo tou lepein, ho esti tuptein: hoi de apo Lepreou polismatos tês Peloponnêsou, hês memnêtai kai Kallimachos en Humnois: Kaukônôn ptoliethron, ho Lepreion pephatistai. hoi de ek leprôn boôn, dia to ta ek leprôn boôn dermata ischura einai. hoi de hoti hoi Megareis leproi to sôma, pros hous spendetai. ameinon de legein, hoti topos exô tou asteos Leproi kaloumenos, entha ta burseia ên. hou kai en Ornisi memnêtai: ti d' oun ton hêlion Lepreon oikizete. kai Agoranomô: genikêi.
Notes:
The headword -- evidently extracted from somewhere -- and primary gloss are either genitive singulars or accusative plurals.
[1] Likewise in other lexica; references at Photius alpha228 Theodoridis.
[2] From Harpokration s.v., commenting on Demosthenes 24.112 and also citing ?Aristotle, Ath.Pol. 51.1.
[3] Aristophanes, Acharnians 723-4 (web address 1), followed here by comment from the scholia there; cf. lambda 291.
[4] Callimachus, Hymn to Zeus 39.
[5] Dikaiopolis, that is, the speaker of the quotation.
[6] What seems to be a very mangled quotation from Aristophanes, Birds 150. A more correct quotation might be translated as "Why do you two not go and settle in Lepreon in Elis?" This would seem to be a reference to the Peloponnesian Lepreon and not to a Leproi outside Athens. See web address 2 below for the text of Aristophanes (and cf. lambda 288, lambda 289).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: clothing; comedy; constitution; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; history; law; medicine; poetry; rhetoric; trade and manufacture; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 30 October 2000@00:03:30.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (cosmetics; raised status) on 30 October 2000@03:28:23.
David Whitehead (restorative cosmetics) on 22 December 2002@09:24:57.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@11:02:46.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 July 2011@03:58:52.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 6 January 2012@01:19:18.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 18 August 2013@09:01:32.
Catharine Roth (removed a link, added cross-references) on 19 April 2020@20:16:13.

Headword: Agreia aoidê
Adler number: alpha,350
Translated headword: rustic song
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The rural [kind].[1]
"He stretched the hide down a rustic plane tree." In the Epigrams.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] a)grei=os, [meaning] the yokel, the ignoramus.[3]
Or someone from the country.
Aristophanes in Clouds [writes]: "you are rustic and clumsy."[4]
The rustic and possessor of a large beard.[5]
And elsewhere: "it's particularly vulgar to see a poet who is rustic and hairy."[6]
Greek Original:
Agreia aoidê: hê agroikikê. to skutos agreiês t' eine kata platanou. en Epigrammasi. kai Agreios, ho agroikos, ho amathês. ê ho apo tou agrou. Aristophanês Nephelais: agreios ei kai skaios. ho agroikos kai megan pôgôna echôn. kai authis: allôs t' amouson esti poiêtên idein agreion onta kai dasun.
Notes:
[1] The headword phrase is presumably quoted from somewhere.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.35.2 (Leonidas of Tarentum), a rustic dedication to Pan; cf. Gow and Page, vol. I (122) and vol. II (356-357); cf. further extracts from this epigram at alpha 325, alphaiota 210, gamma 73, lambda 189, rho 72, and tau 264. The plane tree of the epigram, pla/tanos, is almost certainly the Old World or Asiatic Plane, Platanus orientalis, whose range extends from Asia into Greece and the eastern Mediterranean; cf. Raven (24, 70).
[3] From the scholia to Aristophanes, Clouds 655, about to be quoted.
[4] Aristophanes, Clouds 655.
[5] From the scholia to Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae 160, about to be quoted.
[6] Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae 159-160 (copied here from alpha 1633).
References:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: Hellenistic Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge 1965)
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: Hellenistic Epigrams, vol. II, (Cambridge 1965)
J.E. Raven, Plants and Plant Lore in Ancient Greece, (Oxford 2000)
Keywords: agriculture; botany; clothing; comedy; definition; ethics; meter and music; poetry; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 28 August 1998@16:33:29.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; added keywords; cosmetics) on 16 July 2001@09:09:20.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 7 October 2005@06:02:12.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@08:01:32.
David Whitehead (x-ref) on 6 January 2012@08:05:59.
Ronald Allen (tweaked translation, expanded n.2, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keyword) on 8 November 2018@20:53:37.
Ronald Allen (better wording n.2) on 15 November 2018@18:19:23.

Headword: Adêlôsas
Adler number: alpha,460
Translated headword: having disguised, having obfuscated
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning he] having made [someone or something] unrecognizable.
"Having disguised himself with a dirty cloak and taken a scythe as a worker on the land would [sc. wear/carry ...]."[1]
Greek Original:
Adêlôsas: agnôriston poiêsas. ho de adêlôsas heauton pinarai stolêi kai labôn drepanon hôs an gês ergatês.
Notes:
The headword is aorist active participle (masculine nominative singular) of the verb a)dhlo/w. It is probably (though not demonstrably) extracted from the quotation which follows.
[1] Quotation not identified by Adler, beyond the suggestion that it be attributed to Aelian. In fact Favuzzi [see under alpha 1518] 53-54, citing earlier work by Bruhn and others, plausibly regards it as the first half of a passage of Aelian (about Kodros) that continues at chi 208 (q.v.).
Keywords: agriculture; biography; clothing; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; history; mythology
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 19 March 2001@10:52:04.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 20 March 2001@03:32:38.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; augmented notes and keywords) on 13 August 2006@08:18:38.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 21 February 2011@05:11:55.
David Whitehead (tweaked and expanded n.1) on 9 October 2011@06:52:18.
David Whitehead on 10 January 2012@07:36:34.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 April 2015@10:49:36.

Headword: Adiaskeuon
Adler number: alpha,476
Translated headword: unequipped
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] unadorned, unoutfitted.[1]
"Taking an unequipped horse and inconspicuousness armouring, he drove [them?] at a march against the enemy".[2]
Greek Original:
Adiaskeuon: akosmêton, anepimelêton. ho de labôn hippon adiaskeuon kai kathoplismon anepiphanton, badên prosêlaunen pros tous polemious.
Notes:
The headword is either masculine accusative singular or neuter nominative/accusative singular of this adjective; the former if, as seems probable, it is extracted from the quotation which follows.
[2] Quotation, transmitted (in Adler's view) via the Excerpta Constantini Porphyrogeniti, unidentifiable (but perhaps from Arrian, Parthica: see Roos p.57).
Keywords: biography; clothing; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; military affairs; zoology
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 23 October 1999@03:35:45.
Vetted by:
William Hutton on 21 November 1999@13:22:33.
William Hutton on 21 November 1999@13:23:21.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 25 January 2001@04:42:20.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 13 August 2006@09:04:12.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 15 February 2010@21:46:15.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 10 January 2012@09:53:44.
David Whitehead on 23 April 2015@11:14:07.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 24 April 2015@01:23:23.

Headword: Haidou kunên
Adler number: alpha,510
Translated headword: Hades' helmet
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
See under "helmet".[1]
Greek Original:
Haidou kunên: zêtei en tôi kunê.
Note:
[1] kappa 2698. For the helmet of Hades (which rendered the wearer invisible) see pi 1372 and LSJ s.v. kune/h, paragraph 2.
Keywords: clothing; military affairs; mythology
Translated by: Sean M. Redmond on 25 October 1999@16:52:53.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; changed keyword; cosmetics) on 13 February 2001@08:38:44.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 14 August 2006@08:15:39.
Catharine Roth (added cross-reference) on 2 January 2012@21:47:36.

Headword: Aetios
Adler number: alpha,571
Translated headword: Aetios, Aetius
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
From Antioch in Syria,[1] the teacher of Eunomios,[2] he happened [to be] of poor and lower-class parentage. His father was one of those in the army who were faring rather poorly; when he had just sent that son away, he died. So he [Aetios] having come to the extreme of difficulty took himself to goldsmithing and became very skillful. But when his nature yearned for better studies, he turned to logical theories. And he joined Paulinos right when that man had recently arrived at Antioch from Tyre. He still attended him [as a student] in the time of Constantine, displaying a great force of impiety in his disputations with his opponents, and few men could withstand him. After Paulinos died, when Eulalius held the see as twenty-third [in succession] from the apostles,[3] many of those who had been shamed by Aetios thought it a terrible thing to have been defeated by a man who was a newcomer and a craftsman: they banded together and drove him out of Antioch. Being driven out he came to Anazarbos.[4] And he, so full of every ability, brought forth fruits better than his given circumstances. He did not at all stop disputing them, although he was poorly dressed and lived as he happened to be able.[5]
This man was a heresiarch,[6] who was called an atheist in the time of Constantine the Great. He believed the same things as Arius and applauded the same doctrine, but he separated himself from the Arians. Aetios was a heretical[7] man earlier and he passionately hastened to advocate the dogma of Arius, for when he had learned a little in Alexandria he departed. And upon arrival in Antioch in Syria (for he was from that place) he was made a deacon by Leontios, who was bishop at the time. And he shouted at[8] those who met him, discoursing from the Categories of Aristotle and setting right the contentious arguments.[9] He also patched together letters to the emperor Constantine. But even though he said the same things as the Arianists, he nevertheless, although agreeing with those people, was thought a heretic by his own familiars who were unable to understand the complexity of the arguments. And on account of this he was expelled from their church and he himself decided [it was best] not to have dealings with them.[10] And now because of that there are men who were then called "Aetianists" but now "Eunomians". For Eunomios who was his secretary and was taught by him in the heretical doctrine assumed the leadership of this faction.
Greek Original:
Aetios: ex Antiocheias tês Surias, didaskalos Eunomiou, apo penichrôn kai eutelôn goneôn tunchanôn. ho de patêr autôi tôn en stratiai duspragesteron enênegmenôn genomenos, etethnêkei komidêi paida touton apheis. autos de eis eschaton aporias hêkôn, epi chrusochoïan echôrêsen akrotatos te egeneto. epei de hê phusis autôi meizonôn ôregeto mathêmatôn, pros logikas theôrias etrapeto. kai dêta sunginetai Paulinôi artiôs apo tês Turou eis Antiocheian aphikomenôi: eti kata tous Kônstantinou chronous toutou êkroato, pollên epieikôs phainôn tês asebeias tên rhômên eis tas pros tous diapheromenous zêtêseis: kai ouch hupostatos êdê tois pollois ên. epei de Paulinos etethnêkei, Eulaliou tritou kai eikostou apo tôn apostolôn echontos ton thronon, polloi tôn hupo tou Aetiou elenchomenôn deinon poiêsamenoi pros andros dêmiourgou kai neou kata kratos elaunesthai, sustantes exêlasan auton tês Antiocheias. exelatheis de eis tên Anazarbon aphikneitai. ho de êdê tachista dunameôs pasês pimplamenos meizous aei tôn dedomenôn aphormôn eisephere tous karpous. ho de ouden epaueto tous men dielenchôn, phaulôs de ampischomenos kai hôs etuche zôn. houtos hairesiarchês ên, hos kai atheos epeklêthê epi tou megalou Kônstantinou. ta auta men oun ephronei Areiôi kai tên autên sunekrotei doxan: pros de areianizontas diekrineto. ên de kai proteron hairetikos anthrôpos Aetios kai tôi Areiou dogmati diapurôs sunêgorein espeuden: en gar têi Alexandreiai mikra paideutheis anazeugnusi. kai katalabôn tên en Suriai Antiocheian, enteuthen gar ên, hupo Leontiou tou tote tês Antiocheias episkopou cheirotoneitai diakonos. euthus oun sunexephônei tous entunchanontas ek tôn Aristotelous katêgoriôn dialegomenos, tous eristikous katôrthôkôs logous. epistolas te sunekattue pros basilea Kônstantion. all' ei ta auta tois areianizousin elegen, homôs hupo tôn oikeiôn ou dunamenôn sunienai to periskeles tôn logismôn hôs hairetikos ho homophrôn autois enomizeto. kai dia touto ekdiôchtheis tês autôn ekklêsias edoxen autos mê boulesthai koinônein autois. kai nun eisin ex ekeinou hoi tote men Aetianoi nun de Eunomianoi legomenoi. Eunomios gar tachugraphos ôn ekeinou kai hup' autôi paideutheis tên hairetikên lexin tou stiphous toutou proestê.
Notes:
See Catholic Encyclopedia entry on Eunomianism at web address 1.
[1] Syrian Antioch (cf. alpha 2692 and OCD(4) s.v. Antioch(1)) is on the River Orontes (cf. omicron 622), near present-day Antakya, Turkey, some 20km inland from the eastern Mediterranean coast (Barrington Atlas map 67 grid D4). The qualifier (again later in the entry) is used because there was more than one city of that name, e.g. one in Pisidia (in west-central Asia Minor; near the modern-day city of Yalvaç, Turkey; Barrington Atlas map 62 grid F5).
[2] Eunomios: epsilon 3598.
[3] Eulalius was patriarch of Antioch for five months in the year 332.
[4] Anazarbos: alpha 1866.
[5] Philostorgius, Historia ecclesiastica III.15b, pp.44-47 Bidez-Winkelmann. Philostorgius himself had Arian sympathies, and presents a more favorable view of Aetius than does Socrates Scholaticus, in what follows here.
[6] The rest of the Suda entry is based on Socrates, Historia ecclesiastica 2.35. See translation at web address 2.
[7] Socrates says "contentious" (e)ristiko/s).
[8] Socrates says "he astounded them by his strange language" (e)cenofw/nei).
[9] This clause is not in Socrates.
[10] Socrates says that Aetios pretended to have decided for himself to break his association with the Arianists.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: biography; Christianity; chronology; clothing; economics; ethics; geography; historiography; history; military affairs; philosophy; religion; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 3 May 2001@16:36:40.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (modified translation, added references) on 3 May 2001@22:32:14.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 7 May 2001@20:06:41.
Catharine Roth (modified translation) on 8 May 2001@01:14:02.
Catharine Roth (added cross-reference) on 17 February 2002@23:19:35.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; restorative and other cosmetics) on 10 June 2003@05:36:28.
Catharine Roth (augmented reference) on 28 November 2004@23:37:53.
Catharine Roth (added keyword) on 2 October 2005@01:41:21.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 17 August 2006@00:57:43.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation) on 31 December 2011@17:50:58.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 12 January 2012@06:00:52.
David Whitehead (another note) on 28 April 2015@02:41:46.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation) on 28 April 2015@10:40:42.
Ronald Allen (added map notes and cross-references) on 5 April 2018@23:43:19.
Catharine Roth (modified translation, added a link) on 7 April 2018@18:24:07.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation) on 7 April 2018@18:27:27.
Catharine Roth (expanded notes) on 7 April 2018@18:42:27.
Catharine Roth (recent tweaks inspired by Ron Allen's suggestions) on 7 April 2018@18:45:44.

Headword: Aïdos kunê
Adler number: alpha,675

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