Suda On Line menu Search

Home
Search results for architecture in Keyword:
Greek display:    

Headword: Abaton
Adler number: alpha,23
Translated headword: inaccessible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] sacred, unapproachable, desolate;[1] also an 'inaccessible' road, [meaning] impassable.
Greek Original:
Abaton: hieron, aprositon, erêmon: kai hodos abatos, hê aporeutos.
Notes:
The headword is the neuter singular form of this adjective, which, as a substantive, can be used for the adyton of a temple or shrine.
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge alpha5, and Photius, Lexicon alpha31 Theodoridis; cf. Hesychius alpha91 (where Latte confidently asserts that the headword is quoted from Euripides, Bacchae 10).
Keywords: architecture; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:21:29.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keywords and status) on 20 January 2001@11:38:48.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added a keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:31:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keyword, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:18:41.
Catharine Roth (deleted keyword) on 3 October 2007@19:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:05.
William Hutton (Modifed and updated notes.) on 11 November 2007@07:16:09.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@06:14:37.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@03:58:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@00:52:27.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:33:19.
William Hutton (typo) on 21 August 2013@10:06:07.

Headword: Abussos
Adler number: alpha,105
Translated headword: abyss, pit
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
There was a shrine of Persephone, which guarded much gold from all ages[1] [and] kept it inviolate.[2] In this [shrine] there was a certain pit of gold, not visible to the general public [and] hidden[3] under ground.
Greek Original:
Abussos: hieron ên tês Persephonês polun chruson ek pantos tou chronou pephulagmenon athikton echon. en hôi chrusos tis abussos, aoratos tois pollois kata gês kekrummenos.
Notes:
For this headword see already alpha 104.
The pi 3232 entry on Pyrrhus (the C4/3 BCE king of Epirus: see generally OCD(4) p.1245) comprises a lengthy anecdotal extract on him from the Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus (20.8-9); the present entry paraphrases part of it (20.9.2). The date is 276-275, when Pyrrhus was campaigning for a second time in southern Italy and Sicily.
[1] Literally, "of all time".
[2] Or "untouched".
[3] Or simply "situated" (pi 3232).
Keywords: architecture; biography; economics; geography; historiography; history; military affairs; religion
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 1 October 1999@23:13:45.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@08:44:13.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2003@08:01:03.
David Whitehead (another x-ref; more keywords) on 22 December 2011@03:48:15.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:17:45.
William Hutton (tweaked translation on the basis of a suggestion of Brady Kiesling.) on 27 December 2016@10:22:00.

Headword: Agathês Tuchês neôs
Adler number: alpha,111
Translated headword: temple of Good Fortune
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The interpretation [is] not unclear.
Greek Original:
Agathês Tuchês neôs: ouk adêlon to sêmainomenon.
Note:
According to the equivalent entry in Harpokration -- which prompted the present one, without having the present gloss (also in Photius, Lexicon alpha69 Theodoridis) -- it was mentioned by Lycurgus (fr. 23 Conomis) "and others"; probably, therefore, it was in Athens.
Keywords: architecture; religion; rhetoric
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 1 October 1999@23:26:17.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 29 September 2000@05:41:58.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2003@08:09:02.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 July 2011@09:52:45.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note) on 16 August 2013@07:39:00.

Headword: Ankôn
Adler number: alpha,249
Translated headword: elbow
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
"In the royal palace of Gelimer was a building full of darkness, which the Carthaginians used to call [the] Elbow; therein were thrown all toward whom the tyrant was ill-disposed. There, in the time of Belisarius, happened to be confined many traders from the east about to be destroyed by the tyrant at that time, whom the guard of the prison released."[1]
"And he placed the siege-engines in the way that seemed most timely, and he hit both the wall-angles [angkones] and the trenches from both sides."[2]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gkw=nes, a certain part of the house.[3]
Another meaning of a)gkw=nes is everything that, in a dream, fixes the well-ordered aspect of life.[4]
*)agkw=nes [are] also the prominences of rivers, the ones at the banks.
"It was not possible to sail through to the stream ahead because of the size of the descending prominences which it was necessary for those dragging the ships to bend round."[5]
Also [sc. attested is] a)gkw=nes, [in the sense of] the heights of the mountains. "Some of you seek out the [western] heights, and some the eastern, going toward the evil exit of the man."[6]
And [there is] a proverbial expression: wiping one's nose with the elbow.[7]
Bion the philosopher said: "my father was a freed slave, wiping his nose with his elbow;" it indicated clearly the saltfish-importer.[8]
See another proverbial expression, 'sweet bend' [in a river, etc.].[9]
Greek Original:
Ankôn: en têi basilikêi aulêi tou Gelimeros oikêma ên skotous anapleôn, ho dê Ankôna ekaloun hoi Karchêdonioi: entha eneballonto hapantes hois an chalepainoi ho turannos. entautha epi Belisariou polloi katheirgmenoi etunchanon tôn heôiôn emporôn, hous mellontas kat' ekeino kairou anaireisthai hupo tou turannou ho phulax tou desmôtêriou apeluse. kai dietithei tas mêchanas hêi malista edokei kairion, ankônas te kai taphrous ebaleto hekaterôthen. kai Ankônes, meros ti tês oikias. ankônes de kai panta ta prospêssomena kat' onar to kosmion tou biou sêmainei. Ankônes kai hai tôn potamôn exochai, hai para tais ochthais. ou dunaton ên pros antion ton rhoun anaplein dia to megethos tôn prospiptontôn ankônôn, hous edei kamptein parelkontas tas naus. kai Ankônas, tas akras tôn orôn. hoi de speirousin ankônas, hoi d' antêlious zêteit' iontes t' andros exodon kakên. kai paroimia: tôi ankôni apomussomenos. Biôn phêsin ho philosophos: emou ho patêr men ên apeleutheros, tôi ankôni apomussomenos: diedêlou de ton tarichemporon. zêtei kai allên paroimian, to glukus ankôn.
Notes:
[1] An abridgement of Procopius, History of the Wars of Justinian 3.20.4-7.
[2] From an unidentifiable military narrative. (For the headword in this sense see LSJ s.v., II.)
[3] For this gloss, cf. iota 552.
[4] Artemidorus 1.74; cf. omicron 349.
[5] Quotation unidentifiable.
[6] Sophocles, Ajax 805-6 (web address 1); the first adjective is garbled here.
[7] cf. Mantissa Proverbiorum 3.31 and the quotation which follows here.
[8] Diogenes Laertius 4.46.
[9] gamma 316.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: architecture; biography; chronology; daily life; dreams; economics; ethics; food; geography; historiography; history; imagery; military affairs; philosophy; proverbs; science and technology; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@13:57:02.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (supplied headword; added notes; augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@04:02:29.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 October 2005@08:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 20 November 2005@10:40:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 February 2011@08:38:56.
Catharine Roth (tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 February 2011@01:08:42.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@05:46:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 30 December 2014@00:14:19.

Headword: Agnôneios
Adler number: alpha,285
Translated headword: Hagnoneian, Hagnonian
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The son of [H]agnon.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] [H]agnonides.[2]
Greek Original:
Agnôneios: ho tou Agnônos pais. kai Agnônidês.
Notes:
[1] An entry seemingly generated by Thucydides 5.11.1, which records the demolition in 422 BCE of the "Hagnonian buildings" of Amphipolis, i.e. those buildings associated with its Athenian founder Hagnon, father of Theramenes (theta 342, etc.). The scholiast to the passage glosses the adjective, there in the neuter plural, as "those of (H)agnon". Here it is nominative singular; but even so it cannot have been an authentic way to refer to Hagnon's son.
[2] Athenian political figure of the third quarter of the C4 BCE, implicated in the "Harpalos Affair" (see generally alpha 4000).
Keywords: architecture; biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; history; politics
Translated by: Roger Travis on 23 October 2000@13:31:07.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes and keyword; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@06:29:13.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 20 November 2005@09:58:45.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@07:31:30.

Headword: Agreiphna
Adler number: alpha,351
Translated headword: rake, harrow
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A farm tool, with which they collect hay. "Alkimos [dedicated] his toothless rake and a share of a noise-loving shovel bereft of its olivewood handle."[1]
Greek Original:
Agreiphna: geôrgikon ergaleion, di' hou sunagousi ton chorton. alkimos agreiphnan kenodontida kai philodoupou pharsos hama steleou chêron elaïneou.
Notes:
Feminine noun, also found in the form a)gri/fh (alpha 365).
[1] An approximation of Greek Anthology 6.297.1-2 (Phanias), a dedication of agricultural implements to Athena, again (in part) at phi 116; cf. Gow and Page, vol. I (162-163) and vol. II (470-471); cf. further extracts from this epigram at alpha 3945 and kappa 2794. The opening word is a proper name. Here the translation adopts Toup's emendation (cf. Gow and Page, vol. I, 162) and reads a)/mas [cf. alpha 1574] for the Suda's a(/ma; cf. phi 116. The verb is supplied in translation here from line 6.
References:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: Hellenistic Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge 1965)
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: Hellenistic Epigrams, vol. II, (Cambridge 1965)
Keywords: agriculture; botany; daily life; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; poetry; religion; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 28 August 1998@16:34:30.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 29 April 2002@08:27:51.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 October 2005@11:08:14.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; added primary note and more keywords; cosmetics) on 6 January 2012@08:20:25.
David Whitehead on 6 January 2012@08:21:15.
David Whitehead on 8 January 2012@09:17:43.
Ronald Allen (betacode typo n.1, expanded and rearranged n.1, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keywords) on 22 December 2018@23:31:13.
Ronald Allen (my punctuation error n.1) on 25 December 2018@12:59:02.

Headword: Anchialê
Adler number: alpha,396
Translated headword: Anchiale, Anchialeia
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A city, which Sardanapalus, the king of the Assyrians, built in one day. He built Tarsus the same way.
Greek Original:
Anchialê: polis, hên ektisen en miai hêmerai Sardanapalos ho tôn Assuriôn basileus. homoiôs ektise kai tên Tarson ho autos.
Note:
From sigma 122; and for Anchiale(ia) see already alpha 395.
Keywords: architecture; biography; definition; geography; history
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 27 March 1999@18:16:37.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headword, note, keywords) on 13 February 2001@07:10:57.
David Whitehead on 9 January 2012@05:36:48.

Headword: Adiabênê
Adler number: alpha,470
Translated headword: Adiabene
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This territory lies this side of Mesopotamia, effectively at the source of the Tigris. In it there is bitumen which is called naphtha. It is called Adiabene because there are rather large rivers in it[1] and it is hard to make the crossing [diabasis]. Nineveh[2] is also there. The bitumen provides such a degree of security for the buildings that, once mixed with the baked bricks and brittle stones, it becomes harder than any iron. There too is the Birdless[3] cave, from which rises a terrible vapour, so that it kills every terrestrial animal and every bird that might happen to sniff it. And if [the vapour] were spread abroad, the place would not be inhabited, but straightway they go up and go off again a little way and catch their breath. And this is how both the [creatures] which fly on high and those that dwell all around are saved.
Also [sc. attested is the associated adjective] Adiabenos ["Adiabenian"].
Greek Original:
Adiabênê: hautê hê chôra keitai pro tês Mesopotamias hôs epi anatolên peran tou Tigrêtos. en autêi de esti kai asphaltos hê legomenê naphtha. legetai de Adiabênê dia to einai pleious potamous en autêi kai duscheresteran poiein tên diabasin. ekei esti kai hê Nineui. tosautên de asphaleian poiei tois ktismasin hê asphaltos, hôste tais optais plinthois kai tois leptois lithois summigeisa ischurotera ginetai pantos sidêrou. ekeise de esti kai to Aornon stomion, ex hou deinon pneuma anadidotai, hôste pan men epigeion zôion, pan de ptênon apophtheirein kai ei pros to tuchon osphrêsaito. kai ei eskedannuto, ouk an ôikisthê ho chôros, alla kat' eutheian aneisi kai oligon anerchomenon palin antanaklatai. kai ek toutou ta te en hupsêloterôi petomena sôizetai, kai ta perix nemomena. kai Adiabênos.
Notes:
The main paragraph of this entry is Preger (ed.), Scriptores originum Constantinopolitanarum 151; cf. alpha 4296.
On Adiabene, in present-day Iraq, see generally OCD(4) s.v. (p.12); Barrington Atlas map 91 grids E1 & 2/F1 & 2; and cf. alpha 40.
[1] The two Zab rivers as well as the Tigris itself.
[2] nu 415.
[3] For the same name applied to a different place see alpha 2849.
Keywords: architecture; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; historiography; science and technology; trade and manufacture; zoology
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 17 March 2001@00:26:43.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; added notes, bibliography, keywords) on 17 March 2001@08:38:36.
David Whitehead (restorative cosmetics) on 30 April 2002@08:06:44.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; cosmetics) on 14 August 2009@09:23:53.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 10 January 2012@09:17:42.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 8 August 2013@16:30:57.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 30 July 2014@03:05:13.

Headword: Aduton
Adler number: alpha,542
Translated headword: adyton, innermost sanctuary
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A cave, or the hidden part of the shrine.
Greek Original:
Aduton: spêlaion, ê to apokruphon meros tou hierou.
Notes:
"Not to be entered," from du/w "go into" with alpha privative. See LSJ at web address 1, and cf. under mu 1027.
Same entry in Photius and elsewhere.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: architecture; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; religion
Translated by: Jennifer Benedict on 10 April 2000@09:18:30.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added note and link.) on 10 September 2000@01:00:14.
David Whitehead (added keywords) on 23 July 2003@07:26:48.
David Whitehead (augmented headword and note) on 14 August 2006@09:03:40.
David Whitehead (tweaked note) on 11 January 2012@11:16:21.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note and link) on 5 December 2013@00:50:19.

Headword: Aetos tôn oikodomêmatôn
Adler number: alpha,576

Timeout after 20 seconds; further results omitted.