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Headword: Κρέκω
Adler number: kappa,2368
Translated headword: I strike
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] I sound out.[1]
"But when[2] by the plectrum the Locrian lyre[3] sounded out...[sc. the lyre's string began to resonate with a particularly false note]."[4]
And Aristophanes [writes]: "such things the swans were shrieking, while striking up one and the same loud noise [sc. with their wings] all at once."[5]
Greek Original:
Κρέκω: τὸ ἠχῶ. ἀλλ' ὅκα δὴ πλάκτρῳ Λοκρὶς ἔκρεξε χέλυς. καὶ Ἀριστοφάνης: τοιάδε κύκνοι συμμιγῆ βοὴν ὁμοῦ κρέκοντες ἴαχον.
Notes:
The headword verb is the paradigmatic first person singular, present indicative active. It appears in the quotations given first in the aorist indicative active, third person singular, and then as the present active participle, masculine nominative (and vocative) plural.
For other forms see already at kappa 2366 and kappa 2367.
[1] cf. the scholia to Aristophanes, Birds 772, quoted below, and epsilon 603.
[2] ὅκα is a Doric form of ὅτε , when, at which time; cf. LSJ s.v.
[3] A χέλυς is literally a tortoise. But since the shell of testudo marginata was used to make one type of lyre, the bowl lyre (West, p. 56), this instrument was often referred to as a χέλυς , especially in poetry; cf. LSJ s.v., and chi 195.
[4] Greek Anthology 6.54.4, attributed to Paulus Silentiarius (d. ca. 580 CE); OCD(4) s.v. and PLRE, s.v. Paulus (21). The epigram describes how, during a music contest, a Locrian lyre (cf. lambda 850) player strikes a compromised string with his plectrum; but before the sound fully reaches the audience, a chirping cicada lands on the kithara (cf. kappa 1590), concealing the faulty note. Locris (present-day Lokrida, Greece) is a region in the central part of ancient Greece; Barrington Atlas map 55 grids C4 and D3, and lambda 667.
[5] From the chorus' song at Aristophanes, Birds 769-72 (web address 1).
References:
M.L. West, Ancient Greek Music, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992
J.R. Martindale, The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, vol. IIIb, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; meter and music; poetry; zoology
Translated by: Ronald Allen on 10 January 2009@00:09:33.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (more x-refs; tweaks and cosmetics) on 10 January 2009@05:10:15.
David Whitehead on 17 March 2013@07:49:47.
David Whitehead on 4 August 2014@07:37:29.

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