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Headword: *pugh/
Adler number: pi,3110
Translated headword: butt
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The part around the anus.
Aristophanes [writes]: "as for me, I exercise, and I leap up to my butt."[1] For in their exercizes they used to leap, and the feet of the person leaping would make contact with their butt. And [there is] a proverb: "to look into a dog's butt".[2] In reference to those suffering from bleary eyes, or indeed in reference to those suffering from pinkeye,[3], they used to say "look into the butt of a dog and of three foxes."
Greek Original:
*pugh/: to\ peri\ to\n prwkto\n me/ros. *)aristofa/nhs: gumna/zomai/ ge kai\ poti\ pugh\n a(/llomai. e)n ga\r tw=| gumna/zesqai phda=n ei)w/qasi kai\ oi( po/des tou= phdw=ntos a(/ptesqai th=s pugh=s. kai\ paroimi/a: e)s kuno\s pugh\n o(ra=|n. e)pi\ tw=n lhmw/ntwn tou\s o)fqalmou/s, h)/toi o)fqalmiw/ntwn e)pe/legon, e)s kuno\s pugh\n o(ra=n kai\ triw=n a)lwpe/kwn.
Notes:
[1] Aristophanes, Lysistrata 82 (web address 1), with material from the scholia thereto. The quotation is spoken by the Spartan character Lampito in Aristophanes' version of the Lakonian dialect (Henderson 1987: xlv-l; Colvin 1999). The Suda uses the standard Attic and Koine form for the words translated here as "exercise", and "butt" (gumna/zomai and pugh/n respectively), whereas the mss of Aristophanes have the Lakonian forms gumna/ddomai and puga/n. The word used here (and in the mss of Aristophanes) for 'toward', poti/ is consistent with Lakonian, and inconsistent with Attic/Koine, which would use pro/s. Unlike the other Lakonian forms, however, poti/ would have been quite familiar from literary Doric texts (tragic choruses, for instance) and from Homer. This may explain why it is the only non-standard form preserved.
[2] Aristophanes, Ecclesiazusae [Assemblywomen] 255 (web address 2); cf. tau 844. For more on looking into a dog's nether regions, see pi 2950.
[3] Or perhaps, "those who cast an envious eye".
References:
S. Colvin, 1999. Dialect in Aristophanes and the Politics of Language in Ancient Greek Literature. Oxford.
J. Henderson, ed. 1987. Aristophanes Lysistrata. Oxford.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: athletics; comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; geography; medicine; poetry; proverbs; women; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 10 January 2007@12:59:11.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (set status) on 10 January 2007@18:40:30.
David Whitehead (another x-ref, another keyword; cosmetics) on 11 January 2007@03:32:54.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 1 December 2011@07:50:51.

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