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Headword: *)/abas
Adler number: alpha,20
Translated headword: Abas
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A sophist, who left Historical Commentaries and an Art of Rhetoric.
Greek Original:
*)/abas: sofisth\s, *(istorika\ u(pomnh/mata kai\ *te/xnhn r(htorikh\n katalipw/n.
Notes:
Adler cites Epitome Onomatologi Hesychii Milesii for the entry.
See RE 1.19, Abas(11). Jacoby's Abas, FGrH 46, is a homonym, author of a Troika.
Reference:
Epitome Onomatologi Hesychii Milesii (ed. Wentzel, Texte und Untersuchungen zur Geschichte der altchristlichen Litteratur XIII.3)
Keywords: biography; historiography; philosophy; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:57:09.
Vetted by:
Svetla Slaveva on 31 January 2000@23:27:03.
Svetla Slaveva on 1 February 2000@11:17:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation and keywords; augmented note; cosmetics) on 8 July 2003@08:27:47.
William Hutton (augmented note, set status) on 24 August 2007@23:41:32.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 19 December 2011@06:10:09.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 5 August 2013@00:50:02.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:49:14.

Headword: *)abe/lteros
Adler number: alpha,32
Translated headword: thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] mindless, stupid. For the intelligent man [is] be/lteros ["thoughtful, superior"].[1]
"No, by Zeus, not the greedy and thoughtless fellow, but the mindless and conceitedly slow-witted."[2] Menander in Perinthia [writes]: "any servant who takes an idle and easy master and deceives him does not know what a great accomplishment it is to make a greater fool of one who is already thoughtless".[3] They also call a)belthri/a ["thoughtlessness"] an a)belth/rion ["thoughtless thing"]. Anaxandrides in Helen[4] [writes]: "[A:] an anchor, a little boat, - call it what vessel you want. [B:] O Heracles of the sacred precinct of thoughtlessness. [A:] But one could not estimate its size."
Also [sc. attested is] a)belthri/a, [meaning] stupidity.
Or mindlessness.
Menander [writes]: "their mind drove them to such thoughtlessness that they prayed for victory over each other rather than over the enemy."[5]
Greek Original:
*)abe/lteros: a)no/htos, a)su/netos. be/lteros ga\r o( fro/nimos. ou) ma\ *di/' ou)x o( pleone/kths kai\ a)gnw/mwn, a)ll' o( a)no/htos kai\ eu)h/qhs meta\ xauno/thtos. *me/nandros *perinqi/a|: o(/stis paralabw\n despo/thn a)pra/gmona kai\ kou=fon e)capata=| qera/pwn, ou)k oi)=d' o(/ ti ou(=tos megalei=o/n e)sti diapepragme/nos, e)pabelterw/sas to/n pote a)be/lteron. le/gousi de\ kai\ a)belth/rion th\n a)belthri/an. *)alecandri/dhs *(ele/nh|: a)/gkura, le/mbos, skeu=os o(/ ti bou/lei le/ge. w)= *(hra/kleis a)belthri/ou temenikou=. a)ll' ou)d' a)\n ei)pei=n to\ me/geqos du/naito/ tis. kai\ *)abelthri/a, h( a)frosu/nh. h)\ a)nohsi/a. *me/nandros: ei)s tou=to de\ a)belthri/as h)/lasen au)toi=s o( nou=s, w(/ste qa/teron me/ros th\n kata\ qate/rou ma=llon h)\ th\n kata\ tw=n polemi/wn eu)/xesqai ni/khn.
Notes:
On this headword, a comic formation literally meaning non-superior, see generally LSJ s.v. (web address 1 below); and cf. alpha 31, alpha 33.
[1] These glosses are paralleled in a variety of other lexica (and in the scholia to Aristophanes, Clouds 1201 and Ecclesiazusae 768).
[2] Quotation (an illustration of the first of the glossing words, not the headword) unidentifiable; also in Photius and Aelius Dionysius.
[3] Menander fr. 393 Kock.
[4] Anaxandrides [see generally alpha 1982] fr. 12 Kock (and K.-A.). But note that Adler prints the manuscript reading "Alexandrides", on the strength of the (apparent) mention of such a playwright in alpha 3824. On the emendation to Anaxandrides, see Toup vol. 1 p. 9; Adler attributes the emendation to 'Iunius' (probably Adriaan de Jonghe, 1511-1575, author of a Greek/Latin Lexicon).
[5] Not M. the comic poet, quoted above, but the C6 CE historian Menander Protector [mu 591]: his fr. 28 Blockley.
Reference:
Toup, Jonathan, and Richard Porson. Emendationes in Suidam Et Hesychium, Et Alios Lexicographos Graecos. Oxford 1790
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; military affairs; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:02:21.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; added keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@05:52:19.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 23 March 2008@13:05:56.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@04:34:27.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@11:17:06.
Catharine Roth (fixed note number, augmented note, added bibliography, tweaked link) on 15 May 2008@15:34:15.
David Whitehead (typo) on 16 May 2008@07:55:44.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 20 May 2008@11:50:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:38:00.
David Whitehead (updated a reference; cosmetics) on 3 January 2012@04:21:06.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 22 December 2014@04:27:32.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@09:15:50.

Headword: *)abi/saros
Adler number: alpha,52
Translated headword: Abisaros, Abisareis
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Name of a place.
Greek Original:
*)abi/saros: o)/noma to/pou.
Note:
In the mountains of NE India, present-day Hazara: Sanskrit Abhisara; Barrington Atlas map 6 grid C3. The Atlas uses the nominative plural Abisareis, which is found in e.g. Arrian, Indica 4.12, and represents a pluralisation of the (Greek version of the) ruler's name, Abisares; and the Suda's Abisaros is presumably a non-existent nominative derived from the genitive of this name, Abisarou.
Reference:
A.B.Bosworth, Commentary on Arrian's History of Alexander, ii (1995) 177-8.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; historiography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:04:58.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headword and note) on 9 October 2000@06:54:33.
David Whitehead (augmented note, keywords, bibliog) on 28 August 2006@12:26:54.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 23 March 2008@20:12:21.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 17 November 2009@18:45:50.
David Whitehead on 1 August 2011@07:38:51.

Headword: *)aboulei/
Adler number: alpha,60
Translated headword: inconsiderately, unintentionally
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] without consideration, mindlessly, ignorantly.[1]
"Though he certainly had not guessed the king's opinion, he accomplished it quite unintentionally."[2]
Greek Original:
*)aboulei/: a)bou/lws, a)fro/nws, a)maqw=s. o( de\ ou) sfo/dra stoxazo/menos th=s tou= basile/ws gnw/mhs a)boulo/tata diepra/cato.
Notes:
The headword adverb, noted for its form by grammarians, is presumably extracted from somewhere (other than the quotation given).
[1] cf. generally alpha 64.
[2] Polybius fr. 92 Büttner-Wobst. The quotation employs the superlative form of the adverb (a)boulo/tata) rendered here by 'quite unintentionally'. Although accepting the fragment himself, Büttner-Wobst notes that Dindorf maintained that this fragment cannot be genuinely Polybian, because Polybius does not use the verb diapra/casqai, except in a positive context (p. 527).
Reference:
T. Büttner-Wobst, ed., Polybii Historiae, vol. IV, (Leipzig 1904)
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:11:52.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, translation and note, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:33:11.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:17:38.
Catharine Roth (cosmetic) on 23 April 2002@11:16:43.
David Whitehead (added primary note and another hw option; more keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@08:33:31.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@10:32:52.
Ronald Allen (added bibliography, supplemented n.2) on 25 April 2018@22:49:34.
Ronald Allen (cosmeticule (bibliography)) on 4 June 2018@23:45:53.

Headword: *)abraa/m
Adler number: alpha,69
Translated headword: Abraham
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The first among patriarchs; [it was he] in whom the Hebrew people took pride at first, before they rebelled against God, became estranged from Him, and shed upon themselves the blood of His Only-Begotten Son.[1] This man came out of the land of the Chaldeans, who devoted their entire lives to the stars and heavenly bodies. Trained, therefore, as was their ancestral custom, to observe the motions of the heavenly bodies[2] he surmised that the masterwork underlying this visible creation was not to be found in such objects, but had a Creator who set them in motion, gave harmony to their paths, and ordered the entire universe. Because of the greatness and beauty of the things He had made, Abraham, as it was likely, ceased devoting himself to gazing out into the heavens nor did he squander his passion in their pursuit. Instead, by surmounting the celestial vaults and transcending all the intelligible realm beyond the cosmos, Abraham no longer stood apart from the One sought, until finally the Creator for whom he yearned manifested Himself to Abraham in likenesses[3] and forms. And in this way the Unseen and Invisible revealed Himself. And [God] sent him forth from his own land as a wanderer and settled him in the land of the Canaanites. There he dwelled, now being in about his ninety-ninth year.[4] Until this time, he was childless; then [God] made him the father of the miraculous and blessed Isaac that he might have a first-born, only-begotten son[5] -- prefiguring the mystical image of the First-Born, Only-Begotten Son.[6] This was an exceedingly singular[7] honor bestowed upon Abraham, for the Creator favored him with the titles Servant, Beloved, and Father by flesh of the Only Begotten Son of Him who fashioned the entire universe.[8] Abraham invented sacred writing and devised the language of which Hebrew children used to have a command, as they were this man's disciples and descendants. Moreover, the Greek alphabet received its impetus from this script,[9] even if Greeks amused themselves by forming the letters differently. Proof of this is in the pronunciation of the first and preeminent letter "alpha" because it derives its name from the Hebrew "aleph" by way of the Blessed, First, and Eternal Name.[10] So too, the Greeks through Abraham came to possess books on dream interpretation. Witness to this is Joseph, the truly wondrous descendant of Abraham, who interpreted Pharoah's dreams as they were going to turn out in fact. In this, Philo, the Jewish philosopher, will be my confirmation via his work Life of the Statesman.[11] About Philo it is said "Philo platonizes and Plato philonizes."[12]
The practice of idolatry extended from Serug[13] to the time of Abraham's father Tharron.[14] Thus, when Abraham was 14 years old[15] and deemed worthy of divine knowledge, he upbraided his father, "Why do you lead the people astray for harmful gain (that is, with idols)? There is no other God but the One in heaven, the Creator of the entire universe." Yet seeing the people serving earthly things, he embarked on a tireless quest, seeking out with his pious heart the Truly Existing God.[16] But seeing that the sky is sometimes light and sometimes dark, he said to himself, "That is not God." Observing similarly the sun and the moon, the one obscured and eclipsed and the other waning and occluded, he said, "Those are not gods either." True, he was trained in astronomy by his father, but Abraham all the same was puzzled by the motions of the stars and scornful of them. But God appeared to him and said, "Go out of your land and leave your kinsmen."[17] Abraham took his father's idols, smashing some and incinerating others. Then he went away with his father out of the land of the Chaldeans. And they came to Haran,[18] where his father died. He left there, obeying the Lord's word, with his wife Sarah and his nephew Lot[19] and all their possessions, and came to the promised land Canaan, which the Canaanites had seized and settled in. When a famine arose, Abraham left the land of the Canaanites and went into Egypt, where Abimelech[20] the king took his wife Sarah. God struck terror into Abimelech and paralysed his limbs, saying "Give this man back his wife, because he is a prophet and will pray for you, and you will live. But if you do not give her back, know that you and your entire household will die." When Abraham got his wife back, undefiled, he prayed, and Abimelech and his household were cured of the paralysis.[21] After this the king, honoring Abraham and devoting himself to his sayings, became a pious and expert teacher to the Egyptians. The same Abraham, upon returning from war,[22] was considered worthy of blessing by Melchisedek, king of Salem, who brought bread and wine out to him. Melchisedek was a priest of the Most High, and Abraham gave to Him a tenth of all he had. Melchisedek was without father, mother, or lineage, like the Son of God.[23]
When Abram[24] lamented to God about his childlessness, God revealed to him through a dream that his descendants would be as numerous as the stars. And he believed God, and God reckoned it to him as righteousness.[25] Now Sarah, who was barren, gave Abraham permission to father a child with her maidservant, and she bore Ismael.[26] And when Abram was 99 years old, God appeared to him and altered his name to Abraham, for until then he had been called Abram. Similarly, Sarah became Sarrah with another "r".[27] And Abraham circumcised Ismael and all his descendants. Moreover, when the Lord was being shown the hospitality of Abraham's house, He promised Abraham that Sarrah would bear him a son. But Sarrah smiled; and the one who was begotten was called Isaac, by the Hebrew name that means "laughter with delight."[28]
Also [sc. attested is the adjective] *abramiai=os: [meaning] descendant of Abraham, or towering, revered.[29]
Greek Original:
*)abraa/m: o( prw=tos e)n patria/rxais: ei)s o(\n a)pesemnu/neto dh=mos o( tw=n *(ebrai/wn to\ pro/teron, pri\n h)\ qeou= a)poskirth=sai kai\ gene/sqai tou/tou a)llo/trioi kai\ to\ tou= monogenou=s ui(ou= au)tou= ai(=ma e)f' e(autou\s e)pispa/sasqai. ou(=tos e)k me\n th=s *xaldai/wn gh=s u(ph=rxen o(rmw/menos, tw=n peri\ ta\ mete/wra kai\ tou\s a)ste/ras to\n bi/on o(/lon katanalisko/ntwn. a)skhqei\s ou)=n kata\ to\n pa/trion no/mon ta\s tw=n e)pourani/wn a)ste/rwn kinh/seis kai\ stoxasa/menos w(s ou)k e)n tou/tois i(/statai to\ megalourgo\n th=s fainome/nhs tauthsi\ kti/sews, a)ll' e)/xei tina\ to\n dhmiourgo\n to\n kai\ kinou=nta kai\ dieuqu/nonta th\n e)narmo/nion tw=n a)ste/rwn porei/an kai\ tou= ko/smou panto\s th\n kata/stasin, kai\ dia\ tou= mege/qous kai\ th=s kallonh=s tw=n ktisma/twn to\n genesiourgo\n au)tw=n, w(s e)nh=n, qewrh/sas ou)k e)/sth me/xri tou/twn, ou)de\ th\n e)/fesin ei)s tau=ta katedapa/nhsen, a)lla\ tw=n ou)rani/wn a(yi/dwn u(perarqei\s kai\ pa=san diaba\s th\n nohth/n te kai\ u(perko/smion su/mphcin ou)k a)pe/sth tou= zhtoume/nou, e(/ws ou(= o( poqou/menos e(auto\n au)tw=| e)fane/rwse tu/pois te kai\ morfw/masin, oi(=s e(auto\n e)mfani/zei o( a)fanh\s kai\ a)o/ratos. kai\ metana/sthn au)to\n e)k th=s patri/dos labw\n e)pi\ th\n *xanani=tin kate/sthse, to\n e)nenhkosto/n pou kai\ e)/naton h)/dh xro/non pare/lkonta: kai\ a)/paida me/xri to/te tugxa/nonta gennh/tora tou= qaumasi/ou kai\ ma/karos kate/- sthsen *)isaa\k, i(/n' e)/xoi monogenh= ui(o\n kai\ prwto/tokon, tou= monogenou=s kai\ prwtoto/kou mustikh\n ei)ko/na prodiagra/fonta: tou=to ge/ras au)tw=| kat' e)cai/reton xarisa/menos, to\ dou=lon kai\ fi/lon kai\ pate/ra xrhmati/sai tou= monogenou=s ui(ou= kata\ sa/rka, tou= to\n ko/smon o(/lon dhmiourgh/santos. ou(=tos eu(=re me\n i(era\ gra/mmata kai\ glw=ssan e)mhxanh/sato, h(=s *(ebrai/wn pai=des e)n e)pisth/mh| e)tu/gxanon, w(s o)/ntes tou/tou maqhtai\ kai\ a)po/gonoi. e)k tou/tou kai\ ta\ *(ellh/nwn gra/mmata ta\s a)forma\s e)/labon, ka)\n a)/llws kai\ a)/llws e(autou\s diapai/zontes a)nagra/fwsin *(/ellhnes. kai\ tou/tou martu/rion h( tou= *)/alfa fwnh\ tou= prw/tou stoixei/ou kai\ a)/rxontos, a)po\ tou= *)/alef *(ebrai/ou labo/ntos th\n e)pi/klhsin tou= makari/ou kai\ prw/tou kai\ a)qana/tou o)no/matos. e)k tou/tou kai\ ta\ o)nei/rwn bibli/a e)sfeteri/santo *(/ellhnes. kai\ ma/rtus *)iwsh\f o( panqau/mastos o( tou/tou a)po/gonos, o( tou= *faraw\ ta\ e)nu/pnia w(s e)/mellon a)pobh/sesqai dihgou/menos. tou=to/ moi kai\ *fi/lwn, e)c *(ebrai/wn filo/sofos, e)n tw=| tou= *politikou= bi/w| sunepimarturh/setai, *fi/lwn, peri\ ou(= e)rrh/qh, *fi/lwn platwni/zei, kai\ *pla/twn filwni/zei. o(/ti h)/rcato h( ei)dwlolatrei/a a)po\ *serou\x e(/ws tw=n xro/nwn *qa/rra tou= patro\s *)abraa/m. o(\s *)abraa\m u(pa/rxwn e)tw=n id# kai\ qeognwsi/as a)ciwqei\s e)nouqe/tei to\n pate/ra au)tou=, le/gwn: ti/ plana=|s tou\s a)nqrw/pous dia\ ke/rdos e)pizh/mion [toute/sti ta\ ei)/dwla]; ou)k e)/stin a)/llos qeo\s ei) mh\ o( e)n toi=s ou)ranoi=s, o( kai\ pa/nta to\n ko/smon dhmiourgh/sas. o(rw=n ga\r tou\s a)nqrw/pous ktismatolatrou=ntas dih/rxeto diaponou/menos kai\ to\n o)/ntws o)/nta qeo\n e)kzhtw=n e)k filoqe/ou kardi/as. o(rw=n de\ to\n ou)rano\n pote\ me\n lampro\n, pote\ de\ skoteino\n, e)/legen e)n e(autw=|: ou)k e)/stin ou(=tos qeo/s. o(moi/ws kai\ to\n h(/lion kai\ th\n selh/nhn, to\n me\n a)pokrupto/menon kai\ a)maurou/menon, th\n de\ fqi/nousan kai\ a)polh/gousan, e)/fhsen: ou)d' ou(=toi/ ei)si qeoi/. kai\ me/ntoi kai\ th\n tw=n a)ste/rwn ki/nhsin, e)k tou= patro\s ga\r e)paideu/eto th\n a)stronomi/an, kai\ a)porw=n e)dusxe/rainen. w)/fqh de\ au)tw=| o( qeo\s kai\ le/gei au)tw=|: e)/celqe e)k th=s gh=s sou kai\ e)k th=s suggenei/as sou. kai\ labw\n ta\ ei)/dwla tou= patro\s kai\ ta\ me\n kla/sas ta\ de\ e)mpuri/sas a)nexw/rhse meta\ tou= patro\s e)k gh=s *xaldai/wn: kai\ e)lqo/ntos ei)s *xarra\n, e)teleu/thsen o( path\r au)tou=. kai\ e)celqw\n e)kei=qen e)n lo/gw| *kuri/ou h)=lqe su\n th=| gunaiki\ *sa/rra| kai\ tw=| a)neyiw=| *lw\t meta\ pa/shs au)tw=n th=s a)poskeuh=s ei)s th\n o)feilome/nhn gh=n *xanaa\n, h(\n oi( *xananai=oi turannikw=s a)felo/menoi w)/|khsan. limou= de\ genome/nou katalipw\n th\n *xananai/wn gh=n ei)s *ai)/gupton a)ph/|ei, ou(= th\n gunai=ka *sa/rran *)abime/lex h(/rpasen o( basileu/s. tou=ton o( qeo\s e)kdeimatw/sas kai\ pa/resin tw=n melw=n e)pa/cas, a)po/dos, e)/fh, th\n gunai=ka tw=| a)nqrw/pw|, o(/ti profh/ths e)sti\ kai\ proseu/cetai peri\ sou= kai\ zh/seis. ei) de\ mh\ a)podw=|s, gnw=qi o(/ti a)poqanh=| su\ kai\ ta\ sa\ pa/nta. kai\ ou(/tws a)polabw\n th\n gunai=ka a)mi/anton kai\ proseuca/menos i)aqh=nai e)poi/hse th=s pare/sews *)abime/lex kai\ to\n oi)=kon au)tou=. e)/ktote timw=n au)to\n o( basileu\s kai\ prose/xwn toi=s u(p' au)tou= legome/nois, dida/skalos eu)sebei/as kai\ polupeiri/as *ai)gupti/ois e)ge/neto. o( au)to\s *)/abram u(postre/fwn e)k tou= pole/mou th=s eu)logi/as tou= *melxisede\k kathci/wtai, tou= basile/ws *salh\m, o(\s e)ch/negken au)tw=| a)/rtous kai\ oi)=non. h)=n de\ kai\ i(ereu\s tou= *(uyi/stou. kai\ e)/dwken au)tw=| *)/abram deka/thn a)po\ pa/ntwn. h)=n de\ o( *melxisede\k a)pa/twr, a)mh/twr, a)genealo/ghtos, a)fwmoiwme/nos tw=| ui(w=| tou= qeou=. tw=| de\ *)/abram a)tekni/an o)lofurome/nw| kaq' u(/pnous e)pidei/cas o( qeo\s tou\s a)ste/ras kata\ to\ plh=qos au)tw=n e)/sesqai/ oi( to\ spe/rma proedh/lou. o( de\ e)pi/steuse tw=| qew=|, kai\ e)logi/sqh au)tw=| ei)s dikaiosu/nhn. h( de\ *sa/rra stei=ra ou)=sa sunexw/rhsen *)/abram a)po\ th=s paidi/skhs paidopoih/sasqai: kai\ i)/sxei to\n *)ismah/l. e)nenh/konta de\ kai\ e)nne/a e)tw=n o)/nti tw=| *)/abram e)pifanei\s o( qeo\s *)abraa\m metwno/masen: *)/abram ga\r prw/hn w)noma/zeto: o(moi/ws kai\ th\n *sa/ran *sa/rran, prosqei\s kai\ e(/teron r. kai\ perie/teme to\n *)ismah\l kai\ pa/ntas tou\s e)c au)tou=. *ku/rios de\ tw=| *)abraa\m e)picenwqei\s e)phggei/lato te/cesqai *sa/rran au)tw=| pai=da. h( de\ e)meidi/ase, kai\ *)isaa\k to\ gennhqe\n proshgoreu/qh, ferwnu/mws tw=| meq' h(donh=s ge/lwti kata\ th\n *(ebrai/+da dia/lekton. kai\ *)abramiai=os: o( a)po/gonos *)abraa\m, h)\ gigantiai=os, i(eropreph/s.
Notes:
This long entry is derived in part directly from George the Monk, in part indirectly from Philo of Alexandria; see further in the notes below.
[1] cf. Matthew 27:25 (web address 1).
[2] The Suda's attention to Chaldean astrology derives from Philo, On Abraham, (Colson, Philo Vol VI: XV.69-70).
[3] Use of tu/pos here is twofold: 1) To assert that God's appearance to Abraham was indirect (echoing Philo, On Abraham, XVII.79-80); 2) To impart, as if a corollary of tu/pos in Romans 5:14, that God's manifestation to Abraham was a type or prefiguration of Christ.
[4] Abraham is 100 years old at Isaac's birth (Genesis 21:5); however, the Suda follows Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews 1.191-93 (web address 2 below) in assuming Abraham's age as 99 at the time of God's promise.
[5] The Suda here omits Ishmael, born to Abraham by the Egyptian slave Hagar when he was 86 years old (Genesis 16:1-16). The Suda's omission tacitly acknowledges a covenantal and legal distinction clearly drawn in Genesis. In Isaac, God establishes an "everlasting covenant" for his progeny, whereas God blesses Ishmael and makes him "fruitful and exceedingly numerous" (Genesis 17:19-20). Isaac's filial status is made explicit by God in identifying him as Abraham's "only son" (Genesis 22:12) through whom "offspring shall be named" for Abraham, whereas Ishmael, although destined to father a nation, is identified by God as "the son of the slave woman" (Genesis 21:12-13). Ishmael is, however, mentioned later in the entry.
[6] Christological imagery links Isaac to the personage of Jesus (Matthew 1:1-2 at web address 3 below). See also delta 94, notes 1 and 14.
[7] The Suda underscores the magnitude of the honor with a hyperbolic kat' before e)cai/reton.
[8] The statement, rooted in a paternalistic-filial model that originates in Abraham and culminates in the figure of Christ, approximates the transcendental premise: Abraham is to Joseph as Isaac is to Christ.
[9] The Suda confuses Mosaic and Abrahamic lore. The 2nd century BCE Jewish writer Eupolemus claimed for Moses the invention and propagation of writing: "Moses was the first wise man, the first who imparted the alphabet to the Jews; the Phoenicians received it from the Jews, and the Greeks from the Phoenicians." The 2nd century BCE Egyptian Jewish writer Artapanus attributed hieroglyphics to Moses. According to the 2nd century BCE Samaritan writer Ps.-Eupolemus and Artapanus, astrology and astronomy originated with Abraham, who taught these disciplines and other tools of culture to the Jews, Phoenicians, and Egyptians. They, in turn, transmitted these arts to the Greeks. Philo in On Abraham stresses Abraham's expertise as a teacher. (Encyc. Judaica, Vol 6.964-65; Gruen, 146-51, 157, 294; Grant, 77; Philo, XI.52) At sigma 295, Seth is credited with the invention of the alphabet; Greek legend named Cadmus or Linus as the one who introduced the alphabet to Greece (gamma 416, kappa 21, kappa 22, lambda 568). See also phi 787.
[10] The reference recalls א aleph as the initial letter of ʾelohīm, the most frequent generic name for God in the OT, used about 2,500 times--but a distant second to the unspoken covenant name YHWH (Yahweh), which occurs some 6,800 times (Perdue, 685-86). Cf. alpha 1445.
[11] A reference to Philo's *bi/os politikou= o(/per e)sti peri\ *)iwsh/f (Colson, Philo Vol VI, 140ff.)
[12] Adapted from Jerome's On Illustrious Men (11): h)\ *pla/twn filwni/zei h)\ *fi/lwn platwni/zei ("Either Plato philonizes or Philo platonizes.") Cf. phi 448 and Photius, Bibliotheca 86b 25.
[13] Abraham's grandfather (Genesis 11:22). Seruch in the LXX, שרוג śerūḡ in Hebrew. See also sigma 253.
[14] Abraham's father (Genesis 11:24). Tharra (*qa/rra, *qarra/) or Tharrha (*qa/r)r(a) (Hatch, Concordance, Appendix 1, 71; Brenton, 13); in Hebrew תרח Teraḥ. From the Chronicon of George the Monk, 92.11-12; cf. Malalas 55.5-6.
[15] The Midrash sets Abraham's rejection of idolatry at age 13 (Encyc. Judaica, 4.244). From here to "teacher to the Egyptians," the Suda's source is the Chronicon of George the Monk, 93.16 - 95.17.
[16] On God as "He who is," see omicron 438, omega 105.
[17] cf. Philo, On Abraham XIV.62.
[18] The call in Genesis 12:1-5 brings Abraham from Haran (חרן) to Canaan (כנען). The Suda adheres to Philo, On Abraham, XIV. 67: metani/statai...a)po\ th=s *xaldai/wn gh=s...e)is th\n *xarrai/wn gh=n.
[19] Philo shows a)delfidou=s, as at On Abraham, XXXVII.212, rather than the Suda's potentially ambiguous a)neyio/s for nephew (see LSJ s.v. at web address 4).
[20] On Abimelech, see alpha 45.
[21] The affliction cured in Genesis 20:17-18 is unspecified for Abimelech, but clearly is sterility for the female members of his house. Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews 1.208 (web address 5) relates that a "dangerous distemper" (Whiston trans.) afflicted Abimelech. For other traditions, see EncycJudaica, 2.76.
[22] Genesis 14:14-18; the Suda's source is the Chronicon of George the Monk, 100.17-26; 101.5-7.
[23] See Hebrews 7:3 (web address 6). In the Suda, see mu 544, mu 545, mu 546.
[24] The Greek mainly uses Abraam (אברהם ʾAḇraham) to this point, but here Abram (אברם), his pre-covenant name (Genesis 17:5).
[25] Genesis 15:5-6. The statement "and he believed God and God reckoned it to him as righteousness" appears also in Romans 4:3 (web address 7), Galatians 3:6 (web address 8), and James 2:23 (web address 9). A more idiomatic and semantically precise translation of the Hebrew (והאמין בה' ויחשבה לו צדקה weheʾemīn bah' wayyaḥšeḇeha lō ṣedaqah) reads: "And because he put his trust in the Lord, He reckoned it to his merit" (Plaut, 146). This version takes into interpretive account the imperfective waw consecutive (consequential) (Kautzsch, 111.l).
[26] Ismael (Ishmael) appears in the Suda at iota 644, but with a gloss that belongs to Isaak.
[27] Genesis 17:15. Also as *sa/r)r(a or Sarrha (Brenton, 18). The Hebrew covenant name change is Sarai to Sarah (both meaning Princess).
[28] Isaac (יצחק yiṣḥaq) from the Hebrew meaning "he (Abraham) laughed" in Genesis 17:17, and puns Sarah's תצחק tiṣḥaq ("she laughed") in Genesis 18:12. (Kohlenberger, Vol 1, 37, 39; Anderson, 182) In the Suda, see iota 606 (mostly taken from this entry).
[29] This adjectival derivative of Abraham's name appears in 4 Maccabees 9:21 LXX. The gloss replicates, apart from word order, one in Photius; cf. Synagoge alpha17, Hesychius alpha181.
References:
Anderson, A.W. Understanding the Old Testament. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1966
Attridge, H.W. "The Letter to the Hebrews" in The HarperCollins Study Bible (NRSV). New York: HarperCollins, 1993
Brenton, L.C.L. The Septuagint with Apocrypha. Peabody: Henrickson, 1999 (reprint of 1851 edn.)
Colson F.H., Philo (Vol VI), Loeb Classical Library. Cambridge: Harvard University, 1994
Encyclopaedia Judaica. Jerusalem: Encyclopaedia Judaica, 1973
Grant, M. From Alexander to Cleopatra: The Hellenistic World. New York: Charles Scribners' Sons, 1982
Gruen, E.S. Heritage and Hellenism: The Reinvention of Jewish Tradition. Berkeley: University of California, 1998
Hatch, E., Redpath, H.A., and Muraoka, T. A Concordance to the Septuagint. Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1998
Kautzsch, E. Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar. Oxford: Clarendon, 1910
Keck, L.E. "The Letter of Paul to the Romans" in The HarperCollins Study Bible (NRSV). New York: HarperCollins, 1993
Kohlenberger, J.R. The Interlinear NIV Hebrew-English Old Testament. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1987
Perdue, L.G. "Names of God in the Old Testament" in Harper's Bible Dictionary. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1985
Plaut, W.G. The Torah: Genesis, A Modern Commentary. New York: Union of American Hebrew Congregations, 1972
Smyth, H.W. Greek Grammar. Cambridge: Harvard University, 1984
Whiston, W. The Works of Josephus. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1987 (reprint of 1736 edn.)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3,
Web address 4,
Web address 5,
Web address 6,
Web address 7,
Web address 8,
Web address 9
Keywords: aetiology; biography; children; Christianity; chronology; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; dreams; food; gender and sexuality; geography; historiography; history; law; medicine; religion; science and technology; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:54:17.
Vetted by:
Craig Miller (Under editorial review as of this date) on 6 January 2002@08:24:02.
Craig Miller (Modified translation) on 24 January 2002@19:18:31.
Craig Miller on 25 January 2002@00:26:38.
Craig Miller (Notes added. Additional work pending.) on 25 January 2002@00:29:41.
Craig Miller on 25 January 2002@01:17:54.
Craig Miller (Added bibliography, keywords; changed status) on 25 January 2002@22:21:22.
Craig Miller (Cosmetics) on 25 January 2002@22:51:36.
Craig Miller on 25 January 2002@22:54:34.
Craig Miller on 25 January 2002@23:13:26.
Craig Miller on 4 June 2002@20:45:55.
Craig Miller on 19 June 2002@19:13:42.
Raphael Finkel (Added Hebrew words; minor cosmetics.) on 31 October 2002@10:38:39.
Raphael Finkel (More Hebrew, cosmetics.) on 18 December 2002@10:58:21.
Craig Miller (Additional cosmetics) on 17 May 2003@19:07:49.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 October 2005@08:20:23.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 16 November 2005@07:49:08.
Jennifer Benedict (added 15 links) on 25 March 2008@11:50:57.
Catharine Roth (references, cosmetics) on 10 April 2008@16:09:00.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 10 April 2008@20:15:09.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation, pruned notes, added cross-references) on 11 April 2008@12:30:02.
Catharine Roth (adjusted note numbers; more tweaks) on 11 April 2008@14:18:11.
William Hutton (augmented n. 29) on 17 July 2009@17:14:18.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@07:16:50.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links, other tweaks) on 22 December 2011@19:00:49.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note and links) on 11 November 2013@01:26:27.
Raphael Finkel (Converted Romanization of Hebrew to ISO 259.) on 7 August 2014@14:27:02.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 11 August 2014@00:14:27.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:33:55.
Catharine Roth (betacode typo) on 2 October 2018@02:07:40.

Headword: *)abre/as
Adler number: alpha,74
Translated headword: Abreas
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
*)abre/as: o)/noma ku/rion.
Note:
That of a "double-pay" soldier in Arrian, Anabasis 6.9-10.
Keywords: biography; definition; economics; historiography; history; military affairs
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:29:50.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, cosmetics, set status) on 31 January 2001@13:02:23.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 24 April 2002@03:26:41.
David Whitehead on 1 August 2011@07:43:43.
David Whitehead on 19 December 2011@09:27:40.

Headword: *(abro/n
Adler number: alpha,86
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In Herodotus [sc. this means something] beautiful, stubborn, awe-inspiring, dainty.
Greek Original:
*(abro/n: para\ *(hrodo/tw| kalo\n, au)/qades, semno\n, trufero/n.
Note:
The headword adjective is neuter nominative (and accusative) singular of alpha 87 (and cf. alpha 88), extracted here from Herodotus 1.71.4 (web address 1), and accompanied by ancient glosses on that passage. In fact, 'luxurious' or 'soft-living' would be more appropriate; cf. a(bro/tatoi in 4.104 (web address 2), and Powell s.v.
Reference:
J.E. Powell, A Lexicon to Herodotus. Hildesheim: George Olms 1977
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:38:32.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, augmented note, added bibliography and keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@09:51:15.
William Hutton (Modified my own note, added links) on 1 February 2001@14:00:33.
David Whitehead (modified note; cosmetics) on 5 February 2003@09:50:33.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 December 2011@09:37:09.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 21 December 2011@01:53:17.

Headword: *(abro/s
Adler number: alpha,87
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] bright, delicate, tender.[1]
In the Epigrams: "a cicada sat above a cithara delicately murmuring."[2]
"All the same that fellow is dainty and delicate and weakened by the softness of his body and depraved and with his hair done up like the most licentious little courtesans. And when he goes in to see the king his face and his curly hair are always delicately dripping [with perfume], and he takes as much money from the communal difficulties as would satisfy even the legendary Midas."[3]
Greek Original:
*(abro/s: lampro\s, trufero\s, a(palo/s. e)n *)epigra/mmasin: a(bro\n e)pitru/zwn kiqa/ras u(/per e(/zeto te/ttic. o(/mws de\ o( trufero\s e)kei=nos kai\ a(bro\s kai\ u(po\ malaki/as tou= sw/matos kateagw\s kai\ lelugisme/nos kai\ ta/s te ko/mas a)nadou/menos, w(/sper ai( tw=n e(tairi/dwn a)selge/sterai, kai\ a(brostage\s e)/xwn a)ei\ to\ me/twpon kai\ tou\s bostru/xous, labw\n xrusi/on e)k tw=n koinw=n sumforw=n, o(/son i(kano\n h)=n e)mplh=sai kai\ to\n e)k tou= mu/qou *mi/dan, ei)se/rrei pro\s to\n basile/a.
Notes:
For this adjective see already alpha alpha 73 and alpha 86, and again alpha 88.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha55 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.54.7 (Paulus Silentarius).
[3] Attributed by Hemsterhuys to Eunapius; again (in part) at alpha 1860.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; imagery; mythology; poetry; women; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:39:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@12:21:50.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:35:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 January 2006@10:26:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@04:35:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 December 2011@19:16:16.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:18:56.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:31:02.

Headword: *)/abussos
Adler number: alpha,105
Translated headword: abyss, pit
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
There was a shrine of Persephone, which guarded much gold from all ages[1] [and] kept it inviolate.[2] In this [shrine] there was a certain pit of gold, not visible to the general public [and] hidden[3] under ground.
Greek Original:
*)/abussos: i(ero\n h)=n th=s *persefo/nhs polu\n xruso\n e)k panto\s tou= xro/nou pefulagme/non a)/qikton e)/xon. e)n w(=| xruso/s tis a)/bussos, a)o/ratos toi=s polloi=s kata\ gh=s kekrumme/nos.
Notes:
For this headword see already alpha 104.
The pi 3232 entry on Pyrrhus (the C4/3 BCE king of Epirus: see generally OCD(4) p.1245) comprises a lengthy anecdotal extract on him from the Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus (20.8-9); the present entry paraphrases part of it (20.9.2). The date is 276-275, when Pyrrhus was campaigning for a second time in southern Italy and Sicily.
[1] Literally, "of all time".
[2] Or "untouched".
[3] Or simply "situated" (pi 3232).
Keywords: architecture; biography; economics; geography; historiography; history; military affairs; religion
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 1 October 1999@23:13:45.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@08:44:13.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2003@08:01:03.
David Whitehead (another x-ref; more keywords) on 22 December 2011@03:48:15.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:17:45.
William Hutton (tweaked translation on the basis of a suggestion of Brady Kiesling.) on 27 December 2016@10:22:00.

Headword: *)agaqa/
Adler number: alpha,108
Translated headword: goods, goodies
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Xenophon used the word of foodstuffs and drinks which bring enjoyment and good cheer.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Good Things Kilikon" - with "has" omitted. Kilikon [is] a proper name. He was wealthy.[2]
Greek Original:
*)agaqa/: e)pi\ tw=n pro\s a)po/lausin kai\ eu)wxi/an siti/wn kai\ potw=n e)xrh/sato *cenofw=n th=| le/cei. kai\ *)agaqa\ *kili/kwn, lei/pei to\ e)/xei. *kili/kwn de\ o)/noma ku/rion. eu)/poros de\ h)=n.
Notes:
[1] Xenophon, Anabasis 4.4.9 (web address 1 below).
[2] This is only one possible explanation of the proverbial phrase. For another, probably better one - with another version of the name (Killikon: apparently authentic, as it derives from Aristophanes, Peace 363 [web address 2 below]) - see kappa 1610; but note also kappa 223 and pi 2040 on "Kallikon".
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: aetiology; biography; daily life; definition; economics; ethics; food; historiography; proverbs
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:14:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added links, set status) on 8 June 2001@01:15:16.
David Whitehead (added keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:00:27.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:19:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:18:17.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 22 December 2011@03:59:55.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 23 December 2011@18:41:14.

Headword: *)agaqoergoi/
Adler number: alpha,115
Translated headword: agathoergoi, benefactors
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Men selected according to valor.
From the Ephors.[1]
Greek Original:
*)agaqoergoi/: ai(retoi\ kat' a)ndragaqi/an. e)k tw=n *)efo/rwn.
Notes:
This is the name for a select group of Spartan elders. According to Herodotus (1.67.5: web address 1) five were selected each year from the eldest members of the cavalry, not from the ephors.
[1] Adler called these final three words locus dubius, and capitalized, as here, the word Ephors. For a speculative argument that this phrase should actually read "from the [sc. writings] of Ephoros", see D. Whitehead, 'Ephorus(?) on the Spartan constitution', Classical Quarterly n.s. 55 (2005) 299-301. [The suggestion has been taken up in Brill's New Jacoby s.v. Ephorus, by Victor Parker. However, the evidential basis for it is illusory, according to I.C. Cunningham, CQ n.s. 61 (2011) 312-314.]
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; ethics; geography; historiography; history; law; military affairs
Translated by: William Hutton on 31 March 2001@23:24:43.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword) on 2 April 2001@03:36:30.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 17 June 2005@09:32:07.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 25 May 2011@06:46:44.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 25 May 2011@11:04:04.
David Whitehead (expanded note; more keywords; cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:04:44.

Headword: *)agaqoqe/leia
Adler number: alpha,116
Translated headword: desire for the good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the choice of good things.[1]
"When it comes to getting things done a desire for the good alone does not suffice; there is also a need for strength and perseverence."[2]
Greek Original:
*)agaqoqe/leia: h( tw=n a)gaqw=n e)klogh/. ou)k a)rkei= toi=s pra/gmasin h( a)gaqoqe/leia mo/non, a)lla\ dei= kai\ r(w/mhs kai\ e)pistrefei/as.
Notes:
[1] The headword (a single word in the Greek) is a very rare feminine noun. It is glossed with this same phrase in the parallel entry in ps.-Zonaras.
[2] 'Anon.': LSJ s.v. Perhaps Polybius, according to Adler. But suggested as a fragment of Damascius by Asmus (fr. 20), and accepted as such by Zintzen (fr. 25) and Athanassiadi (fr. 158).
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; philosophy
Translated by: William Hutton on 31 March 2001@23:33:22.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@03:16:20.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 6 February 2003@00:06:33.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@07:59:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:13:57.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 4 April 2015@09:11:44.

Headword: *)agaqw/nios
Adler number: alpha,125
Translated headword: Agathonios, Agathonius
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name.[1]
[The man] who was king of Tartessos.[2]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] "Agathon's pipe-playing": the soft and relaxed [kind]; alternatively that which is neither loose nor harsh, but temperate and very sweet.[3]
Greek Original:
*)agaqw/nios: o)/noma ku/rion. o(\s e)basi/leuse th=s *tarthssou=. kai\ *)agaqw/nios au)/lhsis: h( malakh\ kai\ e)klelume/nh: h)\ h( mh/te xalara\, mh/te pikra\, a)ll' eu)/kratos kai\ h(di/sth.
Notes:
[1] Herodotus 1.163 gives it as Arganthonios (text at web address 1). See also tau 137.
[2] In southern Spain; probably the Biblical Tarshish. See generally tau 137 and OCD(4) s.v. (p.1433).
[3] Zenobius 1.2. On Agathon (an Athenian poet of the late C5 BC) and his reputation for softness see alpha 124; and on his aulos music, M.L. West, Ancient Greek Music (Oxford 1992) 354-5.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; ethics; geography; historiography; history; imagery; meter and music; proverbs; tragedy
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@09:33:27.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 25 April 2002@11:17:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 17 September 2002@05:14:00.
Catharine Roth (cross-reference, italics, keyword) on 18 September 2006@18:09:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:42:50.
David Whitehead on 22 December 2011@07:43:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:34:58.

Headword: *)agaphto/n
Adler number: alpha,154
Translated headword: beloved, scarce
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] that which is loved or unique.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the related adverb] a)gaphtw/s ["scarcely"]. "So great was the foolishness among their leaders that they scarcely saw whether they would not be fighting with all who were taking part in the campaign."[2]
Greek Original:
*)agaphto/n: to\ h)gaphme/non h)\ to\ monogene/s. kai\ ou(/tw de\ a)/ra polu\ to\ a)no/hton e)n toi=s h(gemo/sin au)tw=n h)=n, w(/ste a)gaphtw=s ei)=don, ei) mh\ meta\ pa/ntwn a)gwniou=ntai tw=n sunarame/nwn th=s stratia=s.
Notes:
[1] Neuter singular of this adjective. (For the plural see alpha 153.) Same or similar material in other lexica (references at Photius alpha121 Theodoridos), and in the scholia to Homer, Iliad 6.401. The term is applied e.g. to an only child, who is especially loved on that account: see LSJ s.v. at web address 1.
[2] Quotation unidentifiable. (It illustrates sense 2 in LSJ s.v.; sense 1 is 'gladly, contentedly.')
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: children; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; historiography; history; military affairs
Translated by: William Hutton on 2 April 2000@22:10:59.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; added notes and keywords) on 11 February 2001@09:17:24.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:18:42.
David Whitehead (modified headword and tr; augmented notes and keywords) on 27 March 2008@08:25:42.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; more keywords; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@06:35:04.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:21:09.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 4 April 2015@11:50:24.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 4 April 2015@23:32:47.

Headword: *)/aggaros
Adler number: alpha,164
Translated headword: angaros, courier
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This is what the Persians used to call the royal messengers.[1]
"He sent one of his most trusty men as messenger [a)/ggaros] to the Babylonian" - because of the nobleman Parsondes.[2]
Greek Original:
*)/aggaros: ou(/tws e)ka/loun oi( *pe/rsai tou\s basile/wn a)gge/lous. pe/mpei tw=n pistota/twn a)/ggaron para\ to\n *babulw/nion dia\ *parsw/ndhn to\n a)/riston.
Notes:
See also alpha 162, alpha 163, and alpha 165.
[1] cf. Etymologicum Magnum 7.24.
[2] Nicolaus of Damascus FGrH 90 F4 (vol. IIA p. 333), with an explanatory gloss drawn from the context of the quotation; cf. pi 731. [Additional note contributed by Jan Stronk. The context of this situation is as follows: there were two rivals, Nanaros and Parsondes. The latter wanted the position of the former, because he thought Nanaros too effeminate. Nanaros heard of Parsondes' schemes and, with the help of some merchants, captured him. Nanaros then ordered one of his eunuchs to dress Parsondes as a woman, teach him to sing and dance like a woman etc. Parsondes' ordeal continued for 7 years, until he succeeded in warning the king, his friend. The king sent a messenger, the a)/ggaros, to Nanaros to demand Parsondes' release.]
Keywords: biography; definition; geography; historiography; history
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 16 December 2004@08:24:52.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (restored previous vetting status) on 16 December 2004@08:41:08.
Catharine Roth (removed stray character) on 16 December 2004@12:12:52.
Catharine Roth (added credit) on 17 December 2004@11:31:05.
Jennifer Benedict (removed false link) on 26 March 2008@01:33:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@08:06:17.
Catharine Roth (expanded abbreviation) on 5 April 2015@23:35:58.

Headword: *)agelai=os
Adler number: alpha,187
Translated headword: ordinary
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] no-account fellow [i)diw/ths]. Or the lead animal in the herd.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the genitive plural] "of a)gelai=oi", of no-account fellows, of rustics.
"Such-and-such is likely enough of [= in] ordinary men". Meaning common ones.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] "of a)gelai=oi", of the random masses. It would be used metaphorically from animals in herds or from fish,[3] which they say feed lavishly and in schools [a)gelhdo/n].[4]
Greek Original:
*)agelai=os: i)diw/ths. h)\ o( e)n a)ge/lh| dia/gwn. kai\ *)agelai/wn, i)diwtw=n, r(embwdw=n. tw=n a)gelai/wn e)/oiken a)nqrw/pwn ei)=nai o( toiou=tos. a)nti\ tou= eu)telw=n. kai\ *)agelai/wn, tw=n pollw=n kai\ tuxo/ntwn. ei)/h d' a)\n e)k metafora=s tw=n a)gelai/wn zw/|wn h)\ a)po\ tw=n i)xqu/wn, ou(\s bo/skesqai r(u/dhn kai\ a)gelhdo/n fasin.
Notes:
The closest comparanda for this entry in its entirety are found in the Platonic Lexicon ascribed to Timaeus (971b.10); Synagoge (Codex B) alpha99; Photius, Lexicon alpha134 and alpha141 Theodoridis; none of these matches up precisely, however. Snippets evidently from the same source appear elsewhere, as noted below.
[1] For the distinction see already alpha 186. Thus far the entry = Synagoge alpha49; cf. Aelius Dionysius alpha17; Eudemus 3.20; Hesychius alpha424, omicron3.
[2] Julian, Oration 7 (205D), where "such-and-such" = the invention of myth. The glosses (minus the quotation) in this and the previous sentence are paralleled in Etymologicum Gudianum 4.3 and Etymologicum Magnum 7.41.
[3] cf. alpha 189.
[4] The reference is probably to Herodotus 2.93.1, where both i)xqu/es a)gelai=oi and the adverb a)gelhdo/n (alpha 191) appear (see web address 1). This etymological information also appears in Harpokration alpha8 Keaney (4.13 Dindorf) as well as in some of the sources cited above.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; imagery; rhetoric; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:23:22.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:44:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 18 October 2005@05:38:36.
Catharine Roth (betacode typos) on 12 October 2007@01:13:40.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation, added betacode, augmented note, raised status) on 12 October 2007@19:46:19.
Catharine Roth (added link) on 12 October 2007@22:34:25.
William Hutton (Augmented and modified notes) on 12 November 2007@06:25:26.
William Hutton (cosmetics) on 5 August 2009@13:42:54.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 29 December 2011@06:55:10.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 29 December 2011@11:48:32.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:16:07.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:37:00.

Headword: *)agelai=oi i)xqu/es
Adler number: alpha,189
Translated headword: fish in schools
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those which are paltry and small.
Greek Original:
*)agelai=oi i)xqu/es: oi( eu)telei=s kai\ mikroi/.
Note:
See note 4 to alpha 187. The gloss here (for which cf. Hesychius alpha423) appears to be a misinterpretation of the Herodotean phrase.
Keywords: definition; historiography; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@15:23:18.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:51:31.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 12 October 2007@22:34:56.
David Whitehead (tweaked note) on 29 December 2011@07:04:59.
David Whitehead on 16 June 2013@08:47:11.

Headword: *)aggeliafo/ros
Adler number: alpha,194
Translated headword: message-bearer
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning an] envoy.
Greek Original:
*)aggeliafo/ros: presbeuth/s.
Notes:
Same entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha96 Theodoridis (out of alphabetical order there).
The headword is used -- in the Ionic-dialect version a)ggelihf- -- of Persian officials by Herodotus 1.120.2 (web address 1) and, in a grander sense, 3.118.2 (web address 2); it is also a textual variant (for a)ggarh/ion) at 3.126.2.
cf. under delta 1533 and sigma 994.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography
Translated by: William Hutton on 10 April 2000@23:56:47.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword; added note and keyword) on 11 February 2001@10:47:24.
Jennifer Benedict (added links) on 26 March 2008@02:06:04.
David Whitehead (augmented notes) on 27 March 2008@08:45:16.
David Whitehead (tweaked and expanded notes; another keyword) on 29 December 2011@07:21:18.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 29 December 2011@11:57:27.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:29:46.

Headword: *)agennw=s
Adler number: alpha,198
Translated headword: ignobly
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] in an unmanly way.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the related adjective] "ignoble",[2] in reference to something weak and ill-born.
Also [sc. attested is the relative abstract noun] "ignobility", [meaning] unmanliness and cowardice.
"Thus [the] Romans made ignoble treaty-terms with the Huns out of fear."[3]
Greek Original:
*)agennw=s: a)na/ndrws. kai\ *)agenne\s, e)pi\ tou= a)sqenou=s kai\ e)pi\ dusgenou=s. kai\ *)agenni/a, h( a)nandri/a kai\ h( deili/a. e)/qento ou)=n *(rwmai=oi sponda\s a)gennei=s dia\ de/os pro\s *ou)/nnous.
Notes:
[1] Likewise in other lexica; references at Photius alpha143 Theodoridis. The headword adverb is presumably quoted from somewhere.
[2] Here neuter singular; again, quoted from somewhere.
[3] Attributed to Procopius, Adler notes, in the Lexicon Vindobonense. For the Huns (and Procopius), cf. under alpha 3460.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history
Translated by: William Hutton on 17 October 2000@02:36:26.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@10:54:55.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 20 February 2011@08:11:44.
David Whitehead on 29 December 2011@07:44:09.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:33:34.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 March 2015@00:43:09.

Headword: *)/agesta
Adler number: alpha,203
Translated headword: agesta
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. An egesta is] a military device erected from stones and logs and earth. But some call such a device agesta.[1] See also under egesta.
Greek Original:
*)/agesta: polemiko\n mhxa/nhma e)k li/qwn kai\ cu/lwn kai\ xou= e)geiro/menon. oi( de\ a)/gesta/ fasi to\ toiou=ton mhxa/nhma. kai\ zh/tei e)n tw=| e)/gesta.
Notes:
Copied from epsilon 52, egesta, q.v. for further detail (from Procopius). See also alpha 840, akessa.
[1] According to E.A. Sophocles' lexicon (s.v.), agesta comes from Latin aggestum or aggestus; cf. alpha 840.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography; military affairs; science and technology
Translated by: William Hutton on 18 October 2000@16:00:45.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@10:34:23.
Catharine Roth (modified notes) on 5 June 2002@20:57:20.
Catharine Roth (added cross-reference) on 5 June 2002@20:58:56.
David Whitehead (rearranged notes; tweaks) on 30 December 2011@07:28:29.

Headword: *)/agetai
Adler number: alpha,204
Translated headword: is marrying
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[He] is courting, is taking in marriage.
Aelian [writes]: "Iobas the Maurousian is marrying his sister".[1]
Greek Original:
*)/agetai: mnhsteu/etai, e)pi\ ga/mon lamba/nei. *ai)liano/s: th\n de\ a)delfh\n au)tw=| *)io/bas o( *maurou/sios a)/getai.
Notes:
The headword, presumably extracted from the quotation given, is third person singular, present middle indicative, of a)/gw (in the sense noted by LSJ s.v., B.2).
[1] Aelian fr.60c Domingo-Forasté (57 Hercher). "Iobas the Maurousian" is more familiar to us as Juba, king of Mauretania in the second half of the C1 BCE, on whom see iota 399.
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; geography; historiography; history; women
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@12:23:24.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note; cosmetics) on 23 October 2000@06:10:38.
David Whitehead (x-ref; cosmetics) on 2 May 2004@05:47:33.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 30 December 2011@07:34:02.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 28 January 2012@19:26:37.

Headword: *)/agein kai\ fe/rein
Adler number: alpha,209
Translated headword: to plunder and to pillage
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Marauding and despoiling. But a)gein [can mean], without distinction, both to carry away things, even from dead bodies, and to gather [them].[1]
"When [Baian] crossed to the land opposite the stream, immediately he set fire to the villages of the Slavs and laid waste to their fields. He plundered and pillaged everything, and at that point none of the barbarians there dared to come to blows with him; instead they took refuge in the most overgrown and sheltered parts of the woods".[2]
Greek Original:
*)/agein kai\ fe/rein: to\ lh|steu/ein kai\ a(rpa/zein. a)/gein de\ kai\ a)pa/gein xrh/mata kai\ e)pi\ a)yu/xwn kai\ komi/zein a)diafo/rws. o( de\ e)pei\ e)peraiw/qh e)s to\ kat' a)ntikru\ tou= r(ei/qrou, paraxrh=ma ta/s te kw/mas e)nepi/mpra tw=n *sklabhnw=n kai\ e)si/neto tou\s a)grou\s, h)=ge/ te kai\ e)/feren a(/panta, ou)deno/s pw tw=n e)kei=se barba/rwn qarrh/santo/s oi( ei)s xei=ras e)lqei=n, ei)s ta\ la/sia kai\ kathrefh= th=s u(/lhs katapefeugo/twn.
Notes:
[1] Same or similar material in other lexica; references at Photius alpha139 Theodoridis. For the idiom, see also alpha 293 and epsilon 427.
[2] Part of Menander Protector fr. 21 Blockley. For the Slavs (Sklavenoi) see generally sigma 634.
Keywords: agriculture; biography; definition; geography; historiography; history; military affairs
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@13:28:47.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 October 2000@06:18:52.
David Whitehead (added x-ref and keyword) on 5 December 2003@10:27:09.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 7 October 2005@06:01:12.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; augmented and updated notes; more keywords) on 3 January 2012@04:35:39.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:46:28.
Catharine Roth (cross-references) on 17 December 2016@01:01:54.

Headword: *)agei/ras
Adler number: alpha,210
Translated headword: cripple, beggar
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A lame man.
Greek Original:
*)agei/ras: o( xwlo/s.
Note:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon -- and generated (as she notes) by Josephus, Jewish War 5.474, where this headword appears (spelled with i, not ei: agiras) and is given precisely this gloss. (Perhaps a nomen agentis from a)gei/rw in the sense of "collect alms, beg"?)
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; historiography
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@13:34:58.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented and modified note; added keyword) on 26 April 2002@05:21:15.
David Whitehead (expanded note; more keywords; cosmetics) on 2 January 2012@09:39:21.

Headword: *)/agh
Adler number: alpha,212
Translated headword: awe, curse, charm; breaking
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
It is indeclinable.[1]
[It means][2] wonder, delight, disbelief, eagerness; in Herodotus, malice;[3] in Homer, amazement, shock, smashing, breaking, destruction;[4] some [define it as] sacrificial offerings.
So a)/gh, paroxytone, [means] amazement; but a)gh/ [is] the breaking of the wave.[5]
Greek Original:
*)/agh. a)/klito/n e)sti. qau=ma, xara\, a)pisti/a, zh=los, par' *(hrodo/tw| baskani/a, par' *(omh/rw| e)/kplhcis, plhgh\, qrau=sis, kla/sis, a)pw/leia: e)/nioi, i(erei=a. *)/agh me\n ou)=n parocuto/nws h( e)/kplhcis: *)agh\ de\ h( kla/sis tou= ku/matos.
Notes:
[1] (A marginal addition, Adler reports, in ms M.) The word occurs only in the nominative singular in Homer, where it appears related to the indeclinable adverb a)/gan 'too much'. E. Risch takes it as a rare disyllabic root ending in a vowel, cf. the related verb a)/gamai 'admire' (Wortbildung der homerischen Sprache §3d, p.4). See H.-J. Mette's brief but useful entry in Lexikon des frühgriechischen Epos I (fasc. 1, 1955) 62-63. It is, however, declined in later Greek as a first declension noun.
[2] This paragraph is also in other lexica; references at Photius alpha160 Theodoridis.
[3] Herodotus 6.61.1.
[4] Homer, Iliad 21.221. In its only other uses in Homer, Odyssey 16.243 and 3.227, it is used in the phrase a)/gh m' e)/xei 'shock holds me'. It is necessary there to replace its synonyms qa/mbos and se/bas to suit the metre. Mette translates it, "Gefuehl, dass der Gespraechspartner etwas Ausserordentliches, das Mass Ueberschreitendes tut oder sagt" ("the feeling that the other person in the conversation is doing or saying something extraordinary that oversteps the limits").
[5] The latter word is certainly related to the verb a)/gnumi 'break', probably different from the root for amazement at that which breaks the limits, underlying the headword.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; historiography; religion
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@21:40:00.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@11:26:24.
Robert Dyer (Added grammatical and lexical comments to notes. Raised status) on 2 May 2002@17:02:33.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 2 January 2012@09:44:07.
David Whitehead (another note) on 18 August 2013@06:52:17.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 15 December 2014@16:07:36.

Headword: *)aghlatei=n
Adler number: alpha,214
Translated headword: to drive out, to drive out a curse
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to pursue, to drive into exile,[1] to set upon.
Herodotus [sc. uses it in the sense of] to do violence.[2]
Greek Original:
*)aghlatei=n: diw/kein, fugadeu/ein, e)pita/ttein. *(hro/dotos, u(bri/zein.
Notes:
[1] The first two of these glossing infinitives are paralleled in Photius, Lexicon alpha162 Theodoridis, where the participle a)ghlatw=n (said to be extracted from the tragic poet Nicomachus) is glossed with diw/kwn and fugadeu/wn.
[2] A very loose interpretation of the single use of this verb by Herodotus (5.72.1: see web address 1 below for Greek text), from the ancient glosses on that passage; "drive out" would be better there, as elsewhere. See further under the next entry, alpha 215.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; religion; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 October 2000@22:04:55.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keywords; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@11:41:09.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks) on 3 January 2012@08:22:00.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:56:29.

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