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Headword: *)aage/s
Adler number: alpha,2
Translated headword: unbroken, unbreakable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] unshattered,[1] strong.
Greek Original:
*)aage/s: a)/qrauston, i)sxuro/n.
Notes:
= Apollonius Sophistes, Lexicon Homericum 2.4. Likewise in Hesychius alpha7; Photius, Lexicon alpha4 Theodoridis; Etymologicum Gudianum 1.12. This form of the adjective is the neuter nominative singular, as at Homer, Odyssey 11.575 (web address 1).
All but the last word of this entry is absent from ms M (= Marcianus 448), as are the last several words of alpha 1 (a and b).
[1] cf. alpha 750.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:55:22.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised status) on 26 September 2000@13:50:00.
Ross Scaife ✝ (testing) on 22 June 2001@13:33:15.
Catharine Roth (added link and keywords) on 6 March 2002@00:09:12.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@09:58:28.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added keyword, set status) on 19 August 2007@10:53:47.
David Whitehead (restored lost keywords) on 19 August 2007@11:26:45.
William Hutton (augmented headword) on 20 August 2007@08:18:48.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:09:21.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:45:02.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 16 December 2011@11:36:59.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@05:57:53.

Headword: *)/aaptos
Adler number: alpha,5
Translated headword: irresistable, invulnerable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unharmed.
Herodianus[1] says about a)/aptos that it comes from i)a/ptw ['I harm'], and after adding alpha-privative and dropping the 'i' [it becomes] a)/aptos, "whom no one can harm." Or perhaps the 'a' is not to be taken as negative but as intensifying, so it would be "one who has great power to harm." Thus the first has a passive sense, the second an active. With the negative prefix it also means "one who is untouched."[2]
Greek Original:
*)/aaptos: a)blabh/s. *(hrwdiano/s fhsi peri\ tou= a)/aptos, o(/ti gi/gnetai a)po\ tou= i)a/ptw to\ bla/ptw, kai\ meta\ tou= sterhtikou= a kai\ kat' e)/lleiyin tou= i a)/aptos, o(\n ou)dei\s du/natai bla/yai. h)\ ou)xi\ kata\ ste/rhsin e)klhpte/on to\ a, a)lla\ kat' e)pi/tasin, i(/n' h)=| o( mega/la duna/menos bla/ptein. w(/ste to\ me\n prw=ton dhloi= pa/qos, to\ de\ deu/teron e)ne/rgeian. le/getai de\ kai\ a)/aptos kata\ ste/rhsin o( a)/yaustos.
Notes:
This form of the headword, the nominative singular masculine/feminine, is unattested outside lexicography; however, plural forms occur frequently in hexameter poetry, in the formula xei=res a)/aptoi or xei=ras a)a/ptous (usually interpreted as 'irresistable hands'); e.g. Homer, Iliad 8.450 (web address 1).
[1] The etymological comments that follow occur only in mss G (= Parisinus 2623) and T (= Vaticanus 881); cf. Herodianus 3.2.30.
[2] This etymology, alpha-privative + a(/ptomai ('touch'), is the one most commonly accepted nowadays. See LSJ s.v. (web address 2) and Schwyzer, DGE. Yet there is reason for doubt, and the correct Homeric form (attested already by Aristophanes of Byzantium) may actually be a)ept-. See Chantraine s.v. a)/aptos.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:48:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status; cosmetics) on 16 October 2000@15:10:37.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@07:40:44.
David Whitehead (betacoding and other cosmetics) on 9 November 2005@09:16:30.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, cosmetics, added keywords and links, set status) on 19 August 2007@18:31:56.
William Hutton (typo) on 20 August 2007@04:20:04.
William Hutton (augmented notes, tweaked headwords) on 20 August 2007@08:59:16.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics, consistency) on 25 March 2008@00:11:12.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 16 December 2011@23:59:48.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:14:21.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; note typo) on 2 April 2015@08:36:40.

Headword: *)aasa/mhn
Adler number: alpha,7
Translated headword: I was addled
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] I did wrong, I slipped up;[1] I was damaged,[2] in the sense of "I was overcome by folly."
Greek Original:
*)aasa/mhn: h(/marton, e)sfa/lhn: e)bla/bhn, oi(=on a)/th| perie/peson.
Notes:
The headword is the first person singular, aorist indicative middle/passive, of a)a/w (LSJ entry at web address 1). It is found frequently in epic poetry, e.g. Homer Iliad 9.116 (web address 2).
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge (Codex B) alpha3 (Lexica Segueriana 3.8 Bachmann).
[2] From here on the entry is very similar to Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 1.19, and Hesychius alpha25.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; poetry; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:50:10.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status, minor alterations to translation) on 17 October 2000@17:21:27.
William Hutton on 17 October 2000@17:22:15.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@04:43:19.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added links and keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@04:52:46.
William Hutton (updated footnote) on 8 November 2007@06:02:11.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode typo) on 22 March 2008@17:15:55.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:13:03.
William Hutton on 22 July 2009@15:25:18.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:09:02.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:06:47.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@10:30:04.

Headword: *)aa/sai
Adler number: alpha,8
Translated headword: to harm, to infatuate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
has four meanings: to satisfy,[1] to go to sleep,[2] to harm, to cause pain.
Greek Original:
*)aa/sai te/ssara shmai/nei: kore/sai, kaqupnw=sai, bla/yai, luph=sai.
Notes:
The headword is aorist active infinitive, glossed with four others. The entry = Photius, Lexicon alpha9 Theodoridis, and similar material can be found in Synagoge (Codex B) alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.5-7). Compare also Etymologicum Gudianum 1.8. This particular form is unattested outside lexicography, though it appears as an entry in Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.5, and is presumably related to such Homeric forms as we find at alpha 7.
[1] This meaning is unattested for the verb a)a/w (LSJ entry at web address 1).
[2] In that one loses consciousness and control in sleep, as in Homer Odyssey 10.68 (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:55:13.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Translated headword, changed status) on 17 October 2000@17:24:27.
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 2 August 2004@09:47:05.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, added links and keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@05:15:27.
William Hutton (typo) on 20 August 2007@09:12:24.
William Hutton on 8 November 2007@06:10:34.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:13:46.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:08:03.

Headword: *)aa/sxetos
Adler number: alpha,9
Translated headword: irresistible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Something someone/something] uncontrollable.[1]
Greek Original:
*)aa/sxetos: a)kra/thtos.
Notes:
A word from epic poetry, e.g. Homer, Iliad 5.892 (web address 1), with metrical reduplication of the initial alpha (cf. LSJ s.v. a)/sxetos at web address 2). The headword and the gloss are both masculine/feminine nominative singular.
[1] A related but not identical word (a)katakra/thton) is used to gloss the neuter form of the headword at Etymologicum Magnum 1.32.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; meter and music; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:55:57.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status) on 17 October 2000@17:25:25.
David Whitehead (modified headword, to differentiate it from gloss) on 9 February 2001@04:47:19.
William Hutton (modified headword, added notes, links and keywords) on 20 August 2007@08:09:43.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 22 March 2008@17:17:54.
David Whitehead (spelling) on 23 March 2008@05:06:11.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:14:55.
Jennifer Benedict (another cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:15:34.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:14:10.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@08:39:22.

Headword: *)aba/khsan
Adler number: alpha,11
Translated headword: they kept quiet
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] they were unaware, they did not understand.
Greek Original:
*)aba/khsan: h)gno/hsan, h)sune/thsan.
Note:
The headword is the third person plural, aorist indicative active, of a)bake/w. This form is found only in Homer, Odyssey 4.249 (web address 1), and the many lexicographical notices generated by it. Of those the most similar to this entry are Photius, Lexicon alpha22 Theodoridis, and Etymologicum Magnum 2.30-31. Compare also Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.16; Hesychius alpha54. The glosses offered here and elsewhere probably represent semantic extrapolation from the Homeric context: When Odysseus comes in disguise to Troy, Helen knows who he is but the rest of the people in Troy a)ba/khsan. The translation of the headword, on the other hand, reflects the verb's probable etymological connection with the verb ba/zw 'speak', and the adjective a)bakh/s ('speechless', 'tranquil'). Cf. Chantraine s.v. a)bakh/s, a connection that is sometimes mentioned as a possibility in the ancient scholarship.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:58:43.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Altered wording, added note and link.) on 29 July 2000@23:31:10.
David Whitehead (expanded note; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@10:04:22.
Catharine Roth (modified link, added betacode, raised status) on 26 November 2006@23:52:21.
William Hutton (modified headword, augmented note) on 21 August 2007@09:45:37.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:27:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:20:49.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:10:41.

Headword: *)aba/le
Adler number: alpha,13
Translated headword: would that
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] o that.[1] "Would that [...]."[2]
Greek Original:
*)aba/le: ei)/qe a)ba/le.
Notes:
For the headword see LSJ s.v. a)/bale (web address 1). The entry = Photius, Lexicon alpha26 Theodoridis, and, with the exception of the repetition of the headword within the entry (see note 2), also Synagoge alpha1 (Lexica Segueriana 3.10), Hesychius (s.v. a)/ ba/le, alpha60) and Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.15. The word does not occur in the extant text of Homer, but there are other literary attestations including Callimachus fr. 619 Pfeiffer, and Greek Anthology 7.583.1 (Agathias Scholasticus).
cf. generally alpha 14.
[1] For more on ei)/qe see epsiloniota 55.
[2] Apparently the beginning of a quotation, perhaps from one of the works mentioned above; otherwise the repetition of the headword is hard to explain. See Theodoridis' note.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:45:11.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:23:01.
David Whitehead (modified translation; supplied note) on 2 August 2004@10:13:43.
William Hutton (rearranged translation and notes, added link and keywords, set status) on 22 August 2007@11:14:02.
William Hutton on 22 August 2007@11:17:12.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 23 August 2007@10:04:46.
William Hutton (corrected and updated references in footnote) on 8 November 2007@06:13:12.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:29:07.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:32:04.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 18 December 2011@10:54:34.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:14:01.
Ronald Allen (typo in n.2) on 13 August 2018@21:59:26.

Headword: *)/ablhros
Adler number: alpha,56
Translated headword: Ableros, Ablerus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
*)/ablhros: o)/noma ku/rion.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (4).
Ableros is a Trojan killed by Antilochos in Homer, Iliad 6.32 (accusative case there: web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:07:39.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, set status) on 30 January 2001@08:25:30.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 23 April 2002@09:03:03.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 24 March 2008@17:12:20.
David Whitehead (another note and keyword) on 19 December 2011@08:06:00.

Headword: *)ablh=ta
Adler number: alpha,57
Translated headword: unshot, unthrown
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Referring to] projectiles, ones that have not been dispatched with a view to wounding.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] 'unshot arrow': the one badly shot or the one not yet shot. Declines a)blh\s, [genitive] a)blh=tos.[2]
Greek Original:
*)ablh=ta: be/lh, ta\ mh\ pemfqe/nta ei)s trw=sin. kai\ a)blh=ta o)i+sto\n, to\n kako/blhton h)\ to\n mh/pw beblhme/non. kli/netai de\ a)blh\s, a)blh=tos.
Notes:
[1] Here the headword adjective is glossed as if it were a neuter plural, but see next note.
[2] cf. the scholia to Homer, Iliad 4.117-118, where this accusative singular phrase occurs, albeit with other words intervening (web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; medicine; military affairs
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:08:39.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation, keyword, raised status) on 30 January 2001@08:35:45.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:07:46.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, added link) on 24 March 2008@17:14:36.
David Whitehead (augmented and modified notes; cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@05:00:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:10:13.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 2 April 2015@10:27:20.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 26 May 2019@00:45:21.

Headword: *)abrio/rhc
Adler number: alpha,80
Translated headword: Abriorex, Abriorix
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
*)abrio/rhc: o)/noma ku/rion.
Note:
Attested only here and, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon in this form ending eta-xi; nevertheless this is surely Abriorix (a.k.a. Ambiorix), leader of the Gallic Eburones against Julius Caesar in 54-53 BCE.
Keywords: biography; definition; geography; historiography; history; military affairs
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:34:00.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, set keyword and status) on 31 January 2001@13:24:23.
David Whitehead (modified headword; added keyword) on 1 February 2001@03:55:16.
David Whitehead (note) on 19 July 2011@09:00:27.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 19 December 2011@09:57:15.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 2 April 2015@11:00:30.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 7 May 2015@00:19:45.

Headword: *)/abromos
Adler number: alpha,85
Translated headword: noisy
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A clamorous person.
Greek Original:
*)/abromos: o( qorubw/dhs.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (44).
The headword adjective is attested most commonly in the plural; see e.g. Homer, Iliad 13.41.
LSJ s.v. (web address 1 below) notes that the initial alpha of the word is sometimes (as here) copulative but can also (e.g. in Apollonius Rhodius) be privative, i.e. noiseless.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:37:53.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added note, link; set status) on 1 February 2001@09:43:42.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:55:43.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@03:56:32.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 20 December 2011@04:17:38.

Headword: *)/abusson
Adler number: alpha,104
Translated headword: abyss
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] that which not even a deep [buqo/s] can contain; but Ionians pronounce buqo/s as busso/s.[1]
From which also bussodomeu/ein ["to build in the deep"] appears to be said,[2] from the verb du/nw ["I sink"] [meaning] I enter upon secretly, with a change [of initial consonant] [giving] bu/w, bu/sw, be/busmai, be/busai, [and the nouns] buso/s and a)bu/ssos [meaning] where no-one enters because of its depth.[3]
Aristophanes in Frogs [writes]: "for immediately you will come to a huge lake, an absolute abyss."[4] And he also uses the word in the neuter: "they shall not make peace while the measureless [a)/busson] silver is with the goddess on the Acropolis." For 1,000 talents were stored on the Acropolis.[5]
"Abyss" is what the Holy Scripture calls the watery substance. So since the land is surrounded on all sides by waters [and] by great and small seas, David naturally called this [i.e., abyss] the earth's surrounding garment.[6] Also, "abyss calls to abyss", the same prophet says,[7] meaning figuratively military divisions and the excessive size of the multitude.[8]
"I was under water as [if] in a kind of abyss."[9]
So an abyss [is] a great amount of water.
Greek Original:
*)/abusson: h(\n ou)de\ buqo\s xwrh=sai du/natai: *)/iwnes de\ to\n buqo\n busso/n fasin. o(/qen dokei= le/gesqai kai\ bussodomeu/ein, para\ to\ du/nw, to\ u(peise/rxomai, kata\ troph\n bu/w, bu/sw, be/busmai, be/busai, buso\s kai\ a)bu/ssos, ou(= ou)dei\s ei)se/rxetai dia\ to\ ba/qos. *)aristofa/nhs *batra/xois: eu)qu\s ga\r e)pi\ li/mnhn mega/lhn h(/ceis pa/nu a)/busson. kai\ ou)dete/rws fhsi\n o( au)to/s: e(/ws a)\n h)=| to\ a)rgu/rion to\ a)/busson para\ th=| qew=|, ou)k ei)rhneu/sousin. e)n ga\r th=| a)kropo/lei xi/lia ta/lanta a)pe/keito. *)/abusson kalei= th\n u(gra\n ou)si/an h( qei/a grafh/. e)pei\ ou)=n h( gh= pantaxo/qen u(/dasi perie/xetai mega/lois kai\ mikroi=s pela/gesin, ei)ko/tws peribo/laion au)th=s ei)/rhken o( *dabi/d. kai\, a)/bussos a)/busson e)pikalei=tai, o( au)to\s profh/ths fhsi/n: ta\ stratiwtika\ le/gwn ta/gmata kai\ th\n tou= plh/qous u(perbolh\n tropikw=s. w(s e)n a)bu/ssw| tini\ u(pobru/xios e)geno/mhn. *)/abussos ou)=n u(da/twn plh=qos polu/.
Notes:
See also alpha 105.
[1] This comment on Ionian pronunciation comes from the scholiast on Aristophanes, Frogs 138, quoted later in the entry.
[2] In Homer, Odyssey, where bussodomeu/w occurs most frequently, it has the sense "brood over."
[3] cf. Etymologicum Magnum 4.44. These are principal parts of the verb bu/w, which means "to stuff," followed by buso/s, which does not exist according to LSJ. Probably this is a mistake for busso/s, "depth of the sea" (cf. beta 598, busso/n). The Suda generally has little concern for the distinction between single and double consonants. The author thus seems to propose a very dubious etymology: that a)-bussos literally means "unstuffable" -- i.e., unable to be entered. [Ms M (= Marcianus 448) omits this sentence.]
[4] Aristophanes, Frogs 137-8 (web address 1).
[5] "Silver" [a)rgu/rion] is a neuter noun in Greek, while lake [li/mnh] in the previous sentence is feminine; the point is that the same form a)/busson is used with both. The sentence quoted here is actually part of a scholion to Aristophanes, Lysistrata 173 (web address 2); Aristophanes uses the phrase to\ a)rgu/rion to\ a)/busson in that line itself.
[6] Psalm 103:6 LXX. See again under pi 1083.
[7] Psalm 41:8 LXX.
[8] Referring to the continuation of Psalm 41:8 LXX, "all thy waves and thy billows are gone over me" (KJV).
[9] From Theodoret's commentary (PG 80.1173) on Psalm 41:8 LXX.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: Christianity; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; epic; geography; history; imagery; military affairs; proverbs; religion
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:02:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, added keywords, set status) on 5 February 2001@11:48:31.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@08:11:37.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 4 July 2003@08:14:49.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added links; cosmetics) on 14 December 2003@15:22:17.
David Whitehead (modified translation and notes 6-9) on 28 April 2004@11:16:41.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@00:15:00.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 19 April 2011@18:23:25.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 25 April 2011@04:11:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and note, after consulting with the translator) on 26 April 2011@17:14:37.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@03:45:27.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 21 November 2014@10:58:29.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 21 November 2014@11:44:30.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:36:21.

Headword: *)agaqoi\ d' a)rida/krues a)/ndres
Adler number: alpha,126
Translated headword: tearful men are good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In reference to those who are strongly inclined toward pity.
Greek Original:
*)agaqoi\ d' a)rida/krues a)/ndres: e)pi\ tw=n sfo/dra pro\s e)/leon r(epo/ntwn.
Note:
Same entry in Photius, and the same or very similar ones in the paroemiographers. This version of the proverb is the second half of a line of hexameter verse (complete with the particle d'); there are slight variants in (e.g.) the scholia to Homer, Iliad 1.349.
Keywords: daily life; epic; ethics; poetry; proverbs
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:57:53.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 2 April 2001@04:49:39.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@08:02:14.
David Whitehead (augmented note; another keyword) on 22 December 2011@07:50:50.

Headword: *)agakleito/s
Adler number: alpha,127
Translated headword: celebrated, very famous
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
He who has an exceedingly fine reputation.[1] And [sc. attested is the feminine] agakleith.[2]
Greek Original:
*)agakleito/s: o( a)/gan e)/ndocos. kai\ *)agakleith/.
Notes:
Epic & tragic adjective: LSJ entry at web address 1.
[1] Same glossing, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (130); see also Hesychius s.v. a)ga/kleitoi, and the scholia to Homer, Iliad 3.59.
[2] Homer, Iliad 18.45 (of the Nereid Galateia).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@01:00:32.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 2 April 2001@10:25:50.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@04:01:01.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@00:49:03.
David Whitehead (another note; another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:33:11.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword) on 22 December 2011@08:26:00.

Headword: *)/agalma
Adler number: alpha,131
Translated headword: decoration, delight, ornament, statue
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Anything in which someone takes delight.[1]
"And he [A] gives silver, so that he [B] might complete the statue with the utmost artisanry, adding the size and prescribing the nature of the stone."[2]
Greek Original:
*)/agalma: pa=n e)f' w(=| tis a)ga/lletai. kai\ di/dwsin a)rgu/rion, i(/na e)kponh/sh| to\ a)/galma a)/kras te/xnhs, prosqei\s to\ me/geqos kai\ proseipw\n th=s li/qou th\n fu/sin.
Notes:
See also alpha 132, alpha 133, alpha 135, alpha 136.
[1] Again under alpha 133. Also in Photius, other lexica, and various scholia (e.g. to Homer, Odyssey 8.509, and Aristophanes, Wasps 303).
[2] Aelian fr. 65b Domingo-Forasté (part of 62 Hercher), on an unscrupulous (but unnamed) sculptor.
Keywords: art history; comedy; definition; economics; epic; ethics; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 June 2000@01:06:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@09:59:18.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 18 February 2011@06:57:00.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@03:46:34.
Catharine Roth (updated reference in note 2) on 28 January 2012@19:11:34.

Headword: *)/agamai kardi/as
Adler number: alpha,138
Translated headword: I admire at heart
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
An Atticism, meaning I marvel [at].[1]
Aelian [writes]: "since, also, the [behaviour? remark?] of Menelaus to Paris the son of Priam I neither praise nor admire."[2]
"Personally I admire these men as well, and the Acarnanian most of all above these men. For he was eager to share with his men the things that he recognized they were going to suffer."[3]
Greek Original:
*)/agamai kardi/as: *)attikw=s, a)nti\ tou= qauma/zw. *ai)liano/s: e)pei\ kai\ th\n tou= *mene/lew pro\s to\n tou= *pria/mou *pa/rin ou)/te e)painw= ou)/te a)/gamai. e)gw\ de\ a)/gamai kai\ tou/sde tou\s a)/ndras: to\n de\ *)akarna=na me/giston kai\ pro\ tou/twn. a(\ ga\r peisome/nous e)gi/nwske, tou/twn e)pequ/mhse toi=s a)ndra/si koinwnh=sai.
Notes:
[1] The headword phrase occurs at Aristophanes, Acharnians 489 (web address 1). For the comment, cf. Timaeus, Platonic Lexicon s.v. a)/gami.
[2] Aelian fr.125b Domingo-Forasté (122 Hercher). The allusion is presumably to something in Homer, Iliad 3 (where Menelaus and Paris fight a duel).
[3] Philostratus, Life of Apollonius of Tyana 4.23; again (in part) at alpha 805.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@00:16:18.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:39:43.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 25 April 2002@04:09:53.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; augmented n.2 and keywords) on 22 December 2006@08:55:11.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:04:38.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:57:51.
Catharine Roth (updated reference, upgraded link) on 28 January 2012@19:23:05.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 21 December 2014@19:38:34.

Headword: *)aga/nnifon
Adler number: alpha,144
Translated headword: very snowy
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Homer [sc. uses this adjective, when mentioning] the extremely snow-covered mountain.
Greek Original:
*)aga/nnifon: *(/omhros, to\ o)/ros to\ li/an xionizo/menon.
Notes:
Homer, Iliad 1.420 (web address 1 below) and again at 18.186 (web address 2).
From *aga-snighw-; cf. nu 294, nu 436.
Likewise or similarly in other lexica; references at Photius alpha105 Theodoridis.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; geography
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@23:08:31.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:59:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 19 December 2003@16:25:20.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 21 December 2003@06:26:33.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@01:07:31.
David Whitehead (another note and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@05:32:38.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:08:13.

Headword: *)agaph/noros
Adler number: alpha,151
Translated headword: loving the manly, manly, courageous
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Having an affinity for manliness.
Greek Original:
*)agaph/noros: th\n a)ndrei/an a)gapw=ntos.
Note:
Same or similar material in other lexica, including Apollonius' Homeric Lexicon. The headword is the genitive case -- because it appears in that case in Homer, Iliad 15.392 (web address 1); cf. the scholia there -- of the adjective a)gaph/nwr.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2000@09:07:00.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword) on 11 February 2001@08:50:57.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 12 October 2005@08:03:46.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:16:34.
David Whitehead (tweaked and expanded note) on 23 December 2011@06:10:55.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 March 2015@22:48:30.

Headword: *)agaphto/n
Adler number: alpha,154
Translated headword: beloved, scarce
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] that which is loved or unique.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the related adverb] a)gaphtw/s ["scarcely"]. "So great was the foolishness among their leaders that they scarcely saw whether they would not be fighting with all who were taking part in the campaign."[2]
Greek Original:
*)agaphto/n: to\ h)gaphme/non h)\ to\ monogene/s. kai\ ou(/tw de\ a)/ra polu\ to\ a)no/hton e)n toi=s h(gemo/sin au)tw=n h)=n, w(/ste a)gaphtw=s ei)=don, ei) mh\ meta\ pa/ntwn a)gwniou=ntai tw=n sunarame/nwn th=s stratia=s.
Notes:
[1] Neuter singular of this adjective. (For the plural see alpha 153.) Same or similar material in other lexica (references at Photius alpha121 Theodoridos), and in the scholia to Homer, Iliad 6.401. The term is applied e.g. to an only child, who is especially loved on that account: see LSJ s.v. at web address 1.
[2] Quotation unidentifiable. (It illustrates sense 2 in LSJ s.v.; sense 1 is 'gladly, contentedly.')
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: children; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; historiography; history; military affairs
Translated by: William Hutton on 2 April 2000@22:10:59.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; added notes and keywords) on 11 February 2001@09:17:24.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:18:42.
David Whitehead (modified headword and tr; augmented notes and keywords) on 27 March 2008@08:25:42.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; more keywords; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@06:35:04.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:21:09.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 4 April 2015@11:50:24.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 4 April 2015@23:32:47.

Headword: *)aga/saito
Adler number: alpha,166
Translated headword: might be amazed
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning he/she/it] might marvel.
Also [sc. attested is] a)/gasqai in Homer in reference to the [sense] 'to marvel at' and 'to be envious'.[1]
Greek Original:
*)aga/saito: qauma/seien. kai\ *)/agasqai par' *(omh/rw| e)pi\ tou= qauma/zein kai\ fqonei=n.
Notes:
Likewise or similarly in other lexica (references at Photius alpha124 Theodoridis), and cf. generally alpha 138, alpha 141, alpha 167. The headword -- third person singular, aorist optative middle -- is taken to be quoted from Demosthenes 18.204.
[1] Homer, Odyssey 16.203 (web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; rhetoric
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@14:08:22.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, keywords, added note, set status?) on 8 July 2001@11:59:31.
William Hutton (Added betacodeõ) on 8 July 2001@12:05:57.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 3 February 2003@07:37:31.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, betacode) on 26 March 2008@01:41:15.
David Whitehead (augmented primary note) on 27 March 2008@08:36:30.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 23 December 2011@08:21:23.
David Whitehead (augmnented notes and keywords) on 18 August 2013@05:47:42.

Headword: *)agai/omai
Adler number: alpha,178
Translated headword: I admire, I am jealous [of]
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] I envy.[1] Also [sc. attested is the related adjective] a)gai=os ["admirable"], one who is enviable.[2]
Greek Original:
*)agai/omai: fqonou=mai. kai\ *)agai=os, o( e)pi/fqonos.
Notes:
Same material, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (326 and 162)
[1] Epic/Ionic verb; cf. a)/gamai at alpha 138, alpha 139, alpha 141.
[2] In LSJ, a)gai=os (A).
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@15:01:47.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added notes & links.) on 25 January 2001@12:52:43.
Catharine Roth (Added cross-reference.) on 25 January 2001@13:16:28.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 June 2003@08:19:35.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode) on 26 March 2008@01:59:51.
David Whitehead (added primary note and another keyword; tweaks) on 29 December 2011@06:15:36.
Catharine Roth (deleted links) on 29 December 2011@11:36:24.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 5 April 2015@10:18:11.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@21:44:16.

Headword: *)age/lasta
Adler number: alpha,181
Translated headword: not to be laughed at, unamusing
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those [actions] that deserve not laughter, but indignation.
Greek Original:
*)age/lasta: ta\ mh\ ge/lwtos a)/cia, a)ll' a)ganakth/sews.
Note:
Neuter plural of this adjective, quoted from Homer, Odyssey 8.307 (e)/rg' a)ge/lasta); cf. Apollonius, Homeric Lexicon 4.21-23.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@15:08:31.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (altered headword) on 11 February 2001@09:44:58.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 29 December 2011@06:32:16.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:11:21.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:16:56.

Headword: *)age/laos
Adler number: alpha,182
Translated headword: Agelaos, Agelaus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A proper name.
Greek Original:
*)age/laos: o)/noma ku/rion.
Note:
The name of various mythological figures; also of two minor warriors in Homer (Iliad 8.257, 11.302).
Keywords: biography; definition; epic; mythology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 7 June 1999@11:34:15.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added keywords) on 11 February 2001@09:46:43.
David Whitehead on 1 August 2011@08:14:56.
David Whitehead on 29 December 2011@06:34:49.

Headword: *)agelai/h
Adler number: alpha,185
Translated headword: Agelaie, Booty-driver
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. An epithet of] Athena.
Greek Original:
*)agelai/h: h( *)aqhna=.
Notes:
From the scholia to Homer, Iliad 4.128.
cf. alpha 190 and the note there.
Keywords: definition; epic; religion
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:20:37.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented headword; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@10:06:33.
David Whitehead (another note and keyword; cosmetics) on 29 December 2011@06:45:22.

Headword: *)agelei/h
Adler number: alpha,190
Translated headword: Ageleie, Booty-driver
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[An epithet of] Athena.[1]
From the [fact of her] "driving booty", [a)/gein lei/an]; that is, as a soldier.[2]
Greek Original:
*)agelei/h: h( *)aqhna=. a)po\ tou= a)/gein lei/an: toute/sti stratiwtikh/.
Notes:
See already alpha 185.
[1] Similarly glossed in the Etymologicum Magnum (where the same etymology is found) and Hesychius.
[2] This epic epithet is confined to Athena. The etymology "leader of the host" is also canvassed: see G.S. Kirk's note on Homer, Iliad 4.128, and M.L. West's on Hesiod Theogony 318.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; mythology; poetry; religion
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:24:33.
Vetted by:
Samuel Huskey (Added keyword "epic".) on 25 September 2000@19:47:17.
David Whitehead (augmented headword; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@10:14:11.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keyword, raised status) on 12 October 2007@22:40:32.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 29 December 2011@07:07:12.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:19:02.

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