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Headword: Ἀαγές
Adler number: alpha,2
Translated headword: unbroken, unbreakable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] unshattered,[1] strong.
Greek Original:
Ἀαγές: ἄθραυστον, ἰσχυρόν.
Notes:
= Apollonius Sophistes, Lexicon Homericum 2.4. Likewise in Hesychius alpha7; Photius, Lexicon alpha4 Theodoridis; Etymologicum Gudianum 1.12. This form of the adjective is the neuter nominative singular, as at Homer, Odyssey 11.575 (web address 1).
All but the last word of this entry is absent from ms M (= Marcianus 448), as are the last several words of alpha 1 (a and b).
[1] cf. alpha 750.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:55:22.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised status) on 26 September 2000@13:50:00.
Ross Scaife ✝ (testing) on 22 June 2001@13:33:15.
Catharine Roth (added link and keywords) on 6 March 2002@00:09:12.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@09:58:28.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added keyword, set status) on 19 August 2007@10:53:47.
David Whitehead (restored lost keywords) on 19 August 2007@11:26:45.
William Hutton (augmented headword) on 20 August 2007@08:18:48.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:09:21.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:45:02.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 16 December 2011@11:36:59.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@05:57:53.

Headword: Ἄαπτος
Adler number: alpha,5
Translated headword: irresistable, invulnerable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unharmed.
Herodianus[1] says about ἄαπτος that it comes from ἰάπτω ['I harm'], and after adding alpha-privative and dropping the 'i' [it becomes] ἄαπτος , "whom no one can harm." Or perhaps the 'a' is not to be taken as negative but as intensifying, so it would be "one who has great power to harm." Thus the first has a passive sense, the second an active. With the negative prefix it also means "one who is untouched."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἄαπτος: ἀβλαβής. Ἡρωδιανός φησι περὶ τοῦ ἄαπτος, ὅτι γίγνεται ἀπὸ τοῦ ἰάπτω τὸ βλάπτω, καὶ μετὰ τοῦ στερητικοῦ α καὶ κατ' ἔλλειψιν τοῦ ι ἄαπτος, ὃν οὐδεὶς δύναται βλάψαι. ἢ οὐχὶ κατὰ στέρησιν ἐκληπτέον τὸ α, ἀλλὰ κατ' ἐπίτασιν, ἵν' ᾖ ὁ μεγάλα δυνάμενος βλάπτειν. ὥστε τὸ μὲν πρῶτον δηλοῖ πάθος, τὸ δὲ δεύτερον ἐνέργειαν. λέγεται δὲ καὶ ἄαπτος κατὰ στέρησιν ὁ ἄψαυστος.
Notes:
This form of the headword, the nominative singular masculine/feminine, is unattested outside lexicography; however, plural forms occur frequently in hexameter poetry, in the formula χεῖρες ἄαπτοι or χεῖρας ἀάπτους (usually interpreted as 'irresistable hands'); e.g. Homer, Iliad 8.450 (web address 1).
[1] The etymological comments that follow occur only in mss G (= Parisinus 2623) and T (= Vaticanus 881); cf. Herodianus 3.2.30.
[2] This etymology, alpha-privative + ἅπτομαι ('touch'), is the one most commonly accepted nowadays. See LSJ s.v. (web address 2) and Schwyzer, DGE. Yet there is reason for doubt, and the correct Homeric form (attested already by Aristophanes of Byzantium) may actually be ἀεπτ- . See Chantraine s.v. ἄαπτος .
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:48:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status; cosmetics) on 16 October 2000@15:10:37.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@07:40:44.
David Whitehead (betacoding and other cosmetics) on 9 November 2005@09:16:30.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, cosmetics, added keywords and links, set status) on 19 August 2007@18:31:56.
William Hutton (typo) on 20 August 2007@04:20:04.
William Hutton (augmented notes, tweaked headwords) on 20 August 2007@08:59:16.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics, consistency) on 25 March 2008@00:11:12.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 16 December 2011@23:59:48.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:14:21.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; note typo) on 2 April 2015@08:36:40.

Headword: Ἀασάμην
Adler number: alpha,7
Translated headword: I was addled
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] I did wrong, I slipped up;[1] I was damaged,[2] in the sense of "I was overcome by folly."
Greek Original:
Ἀασάμην: ἥμαρτον, ἐσφάλην: ἐβλάβην, οἷον ἄτῃ περιέπεσον.
Notes:
The headword is the first person singular, aorist indicative middle/passive, of ἀάω (LSJ entry at web address 1). It is found frequently in epic poetry, e.g. Homer Iliad 9.116 (web address 2).
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge (Codex B) alpha3 (Lexica Segueriana 3.8 Bachmann).
[2] From here on the entry is very similar to Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 1.19, and Hesychius alpha25.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; poetry; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:50:10.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status, minor alterations to translation) on 17 October 2000@17:21:27.
William Hutton on 17 October 2000@17:22:15.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@04:43:19.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added links and keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@04:52:46.
William Hutton (updated footnote) on 8 November 2007@06:02:11.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode typo) on 22 March 2008@17:15:55.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:13:03.
William Hutton on 22 July 2009@15:25:18.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:09:02.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:06:47.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@10:30:04.

Headword: Ἀάσαι
Adler number: alpha,8
Translated headword: to harm, to infatuate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
has four meanings: to satisfy,[1] to go to sleep,[2] to harm, to cause pain.
Greek Original:
Ἀάσαι τέσσαρα σημαίνει: κορέσαι, καθυπνῶσαι, βλάψαι, λυπῆσαι.
Notes:
The headword is aorist active infinitive, glossed with four others. The entry = Photius, Lexicon alpha9 Theodoridis, and similar material can be found in Synagoge (Codex B) alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.5-7). Compare also Etymologicum Gudianum 1.8. This particular form is unattested outside lexicography, though it appears as an entry in Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.5, and is presumably related to such Homeric forms as we find at alpha 7.
[1] This meaning is unattested for the verb ἀάω (LSJ entry at web address 1).
[2] In that one loses consciousness and control in sleep, as in Homer Odyssey 10.68 (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:55:13.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Translated headword, changed status) on 17 October 2000@17:24:27.
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 2 August 2004@09:47:05.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, added links and keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@05:15:27.
William Hutton (typo) on 20 August 2007@09:12:24.
William Hutton on 8 November 2007@06:10:34.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:13:46.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:08:03.

Headword: Ἀάσχετος
Adler number: alpha,9
Translated headword: irresistible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Something someone/something] uncontrollable.[1]
Greek Original:
Ἀάσχετος: ἀκράτητος.
Notes:
A word from epic poetry, e.g. Homer, Iliad 5.892 (web address 1), with metrical reduplication of the initial alpha (cf. LSJ s.v. ἄσχετος at web address 2). The headword and the gloss are both masculine/feminine nominative singular.
[1] A related but not identical word (ἀκατακράτητον ) is used to gloss the neuter form of the headword at Etymologicum Magnum 1.32.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; meter and music; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:55:57.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status) on 17 October 2000@17:25:25.
David Whitehead (modified headword, to differentiate it from gloss) on 9 February 2001@04:47:19.
William Hutton (modified headword, added notes, links and keywords) on 20 August 2007@08:09:43.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 22 March 2008@17:17:54.
David Whitehead (spelling) on 23 March 2008@05:06:11.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:14:55.
Jennifer Benedict (another cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:15:34.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:14:10.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@08:39:22.

Headword: Ἀβάκησαν
Adler number: alpha,11
Translated headword: they kept quiet
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] they were unaware, they did not understand.
Greek Original:
Ἀβάκησαν: ἠγνόησαν, ἠσυνέτησαν.
Note:
The headword is the third person plural, aorist indicative active, of ἀβακέω . This form is found only in Homer, Odyssey 4.249 (web address 1), and the many lexicographical notices generated by it. Of those the most similar to this entry are Photius, Lexicon alpha22 Theodoridis, and Etymologicum Magnum 2.30-31. Compare also Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.16; Hesychius alpha54. The glosses offered here and elsewhere probably represent semantic extrapolation from the Homeric context: When Odysseus comes in disguise to Troy, Helen knows who he is but the rest of the people in Troy ἀβάκησαν . The translation of the headword, on the other hand, reflects the verb's probable etymological connection with the verb βάζω 'speak', and the adjective ἀβακής ('speechless', 'tranquil'). Cf. Chantraine s.v. ἀβακής , a connection that is sometimes mentioned as a possibility in the ancient scholarship.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:58:43.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Altered wording, added note and link.) on 29 July 2000@23:31:10.
David Whitehead (expanded note; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@10:04:22.
Catharine Roth (modified link, added betacode, raised status) on 26 November 2006@23:52:21.
William Hutton (modified headword, augmented note) on 21 August 2007@09:45:37.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:27:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:20:49.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:10:41.

Headword: Ἀβάλε
Adler number: alpha,13
Translated headword: would that
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] o that.[1] "Would that [...]."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβάλε: εἴθε ἀβάλε.
Notes:
For the headword see LSJ s.v. ἄβαλε (web address 1). The entry = Photius, Lexicon alpha26 Theodoridis, and, with the exception of the repetition of the headword within the entry (see note 2), also Synagoge alpha1 (Lexica Segueriana 3.10), Hesychius (s.v. ἄ βάλε , alpha60) and Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.15. The word does not occur in the extant text of Homer, but there are other literary attestations including Callimachus fr. 619 Pfeiffer, and Greek Anthology 7.583.1 (Agathias Scholasticus).
cf. generally alpha 14.
[1] For more on εἴθε see epsiloniota 55.
[2] Apparently the beginning of a quotation, perhaps from one of the works mentioned above; otherwise the repetition of the headword is hard to explain. See Theodoridis' note.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:45:11.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:23:01.
David Whitehead (modified translation; supplied note) on 2 August 2004@10:13:43.
William Hutton (rearranged translation and notes, added link and keywords, set status) on 22 August 2007@11:14:02.
William Hutton on 22 August 2007@11:17:12.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 23 August 2007@10:04:46.
William Hutton (corrected and updated references in footnote) on 8 November 2007@06:13:12.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:29:07.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:32:04.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 18 December 2011@10:54:34.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:14:01.
Ronald Allen (typo in n.2) on 13 August 2018@21:59:26.

Headword: Ἄβιος
Adler number: alpha,47
Translated headword: full-lived
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Antiphon has ἄβιον for one who has acquired a good living.[1] Similarly Homer has ἄξυλον for "full of timber."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἄβιος: Ἀντιφῶν τὸν ἄβιον ἐπὶ τοῦ πολὺν τὸν βίον τάττει κεκτημένου. ὥσπερ καὶ Ὅμηρος τὸ ἄξυλον ἀντὶ τοῦ πολύξυλον.
Notes:
= Harpocration s.v. (A2 Keaney).
The point is that the alpha prefix intensifies, rather than negates as it usually does: LSJ entries for ἄβιος (A) and (B) at web address 1. On the different alpha prefixes, see LSJ.
[1] Antiphon (the sophist) B87 F43 Diels-Kranz.
[2] Homer, Iliad 11.155 (web address 2): ἐν ἀξύλῳ... ὕλῃ , of a forest fire falling in "a wood with much dead timber," and thus spreading rapidly. On the meaning of this adjective see Lexikon des frühgriechischen Epos I (fasc. 6, 1969) 974-75. (Although LSJ correctly defines ξύλον as 'timber', the entry there for ἄξυλος erroneously assumes alpha privative and is misleading.)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: botany; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@18:59:58.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added note.) on 30 July 2000@22:59:00.
David Whitehead (added note) on 9 October 2000@06:48:14.
Catharine Roth (added link) on 4 September 2001@23:26:33.
Robert Dyer (Corrected error in note 2 (and corresponding translation) arising from a mistranslation in LSJ. Raised status, added keywords) on 6 May 2002@18:17:20.
Robert Dyer (Cosmetics) on 6 May 2002@18:20:58.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 23 March 2008@14:30:04.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 23 March 2008@20:07:24.
David Whitehead (augmented notes) on 24 March 2008@05:13:43.
Jennifer Benedict (fixed my betacode typo) on 25 March 2008@11:20:15.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics, deleted link) on 17 November 2009@15:29:14.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 8 August 2013@00:38:05.

Headword: Ἀβλεμέως
Adler number: alpha,54
Translated headword: fecklessly, heedlessly
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] thoughtlessly.
Greek Original:
Ἀβλεμέως: ἀφροντίστως.
Notes:
This rare adverb occurs in -- and is surely extracted from -- a fragment of the epic poet Panyassis (pi 248) preserved in Athenaeus, Deipnosophists 2.36D (2.3 Kaibel); it refers there to intemperate drinking.
See also Etymologicum Magnum 3.24 and other lexica.
Reference:
Apostolos Athanassakis, "Blemeaino/ablemes (-eos): Meaning and Possible Etymology," Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association, Vol. 101, (1970), pp. 51-61
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; food
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:06:08.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation, added keyword, set status) on 30 January 2001@08:13:47.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 5 February 2003@09:40:16.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added bibliography, raised status) on 19 May 2008@15:40:50.
David Whitehead (expanded note; more keywords) on 19 December 2011@07:55:52.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 13 January 2015@23:40:50.
David Whitehead (tweaked a ref) on 14 January 2015@02:47:42.

Headword: Ἄβληρος
Adler number: alpha,56
Translated headword: Ableros, Ablerus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
Ἄβληρος: ὄνομα κύριον.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (4).
Ableros is a Trojan killed by Antilochos in Homer, Iliad 6.32 (accusative case there: web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:07:39.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, set status) on 30 January 2001@08:25:30.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 23 April 2002@09:03:03.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 24 March 2008@17:12:20.
David Whitehead (another note and keyword) on 19 December 2011@08:06:00.

Headword: Ἀβλῆτα
Adler number: alpha,57
Translated headword: unshot, unthrown
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Referring to] projectiles, ones that have not been dispatched with a view to wounding.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] 'unshot arrow': the one badly shot or the one not yet shot. Declines ἀβλὴς , [genitive] ἀβλῆτος .[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβλῆτα: βέλη, τὰ μὴ πεμφθέντα εἰς τρῶσιν. καὶ ἀβλῆτα ὀϊστὸν, τὸν κακόβλητον ἢ τὸν μήπω βεβλημένον. κλίνεται δὲ ἀβλὴς, ἀβλῆτος.
Notes:
[1] Here the headword adjective is glossed as if it were a neuter plural, but see next note.
[2] cf. the scholia to Homer, Iliad 4.117-118, where this accusative singular phrase occurs, albeit with other words intervening (web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; medicine; military affairs
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:08:39.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation, keyword, raised status) on 30 January 2001@08:35:45.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:07:46.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, added link) on 24 March 2008@17:14:36.
David Whitehead (augmented and modified notes; cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@05:00:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:10:13.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 2 April 2015@10:27:20.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 26 May 2019@00:45:21.

Headword: Ἀβληχρήν
Adler number: alpha,58
Translated headword: feeble
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] weak. For what is strong [is] βληχρόν .[1]
Aelian [writes]: "so she brought her life to an end gently and with a calm and feeble death, such as even Homer seems to me to praise."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβληχρήν: ἀσθενῆ. βληχρὸν γὰρ τὸ ἰσχυρόν. Αἰλιανός: κατέστρεψεν οὖν τὸν βίον πράως τε καὶ σὺν γαλήνῃ καὶ ἀβληχρῷ θανάτῳ, ὅνπερ οὖν ἐπαινεῖν καὶ Ὅμηρος δοκεῖ μοι.
Notes:
The headword adjective is feminine accusative singular. It is extracted from Homer, Iliad 5.337, where it refers to Aphrodite's hand; cf. the scholia there.
[1] Same or similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha42 Theodoridis); and cf. beta 340. This seems to be an error, however: βληχρός is well attested as meaning "weak" by itself: see web address 1 for the LSJ entry. The lexica mistake the copulative alpha in the headword for an alpha privative.
[2] Aelian fr. 182d Domingo-Forasté (179 Hercher): cf. Homer, Odyssey 11.135 (web address 2 below). The preceding fragment, quoted at tau 596, shows that the subject is a woman.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; poetry; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:09:47.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation and notes, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@08:53:17.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 4 September 2001@23:32:57.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 June 2003@08:00:49.
David Whitehead (typo) on 17 July 2003@03:43:18.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@17:16:29.
David Whitehead (added primary note and more keywords; tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:20:09.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link and reference) on 28 January 2012@18:52:16.
Catharine Roth (tweaks, cross-reference, keyword) on 14 October 2012@01:44:40.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:49:04.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:03:02.

Headword: Ἀβριόρηξ
Adler number: alpha,80
Translated headword: Abriorex, Abriorix
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
Ἀβριόρηξ: ὄνομα κύριον.
Note:
Attested only here and, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon in this form ending eta-xi; nevertheless this is surely Abriorix (a.k.a. Ambiorix), leader of the Gallic Eburones against Julius Caesar in 54-53 BCE.
Keywords: biography; definition; geography; historiography; history; military affairs
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:34:00.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, set keyword and status) on 31 January 2001@13:24:23.
David Whitehead (modified headword; added keyword) on 1 February 2001@03:55:16.
David Whitehead (note) on 19 July 2011@09:00:27.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 19 December 2011@09:57:15.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 2 April 2015@11:00:30.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 7 May 2015@00:19:45.

Headword: Ἄβρομος
Adler number: alpha,85
Translated headword: noisy
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A clamorous person.
Greek Original:
Ἄβρομος: ὁ θορυβώδης.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (44).
The headword adjective is attested most commonly in the plural; see e.g. Homer, Iliad 13.41.
LSJ s.v. (web address 1 below) notes that the initial alpha of the word is sometimes (as here) copulative but can also (e.g. in Apollonius Rhodius) be privative, i.e. noiseless.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:37:53.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added note, link; set status) on 1 February 2001@09:43:42.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:55:43.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@03:56:32.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 20 December 2011@04:17:38.

Headword: Ἀβροτάζω
Adler number: alpha,90
Translated headword: I miss (someone on the way)
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] I am mistaken/I err.
Greek Original:
Ἀβροτάζω: ἁμαρτάνω.
Notes:
Though the headword verb is presented here (and in some other lexica) in the paradigmatic first person singular, present indicative, its only appearance outside lexica etc. is in Homer, Iliad 10.65 (web address 1), where it is in the first person plural, aorist subjunctive active ἀβροτάξομεν (in the construction after a command + μή : Chantraine, Grammaire homérique, vol. 2, pp. 208-209, paras. 307-308). Agamemnon tells Menelaus to stay where he is, 'in case we somehow miss each other on the way, for there are many paths in the camp').
The verb is formed with the deverbative suffix -άζω from the Aeolic aorist ἄβροτον , ἤμβροτον (eta 286) of ἁμαρτάνω , i.e. the verb in the present gloss; cf. alpha 1495, alpha 1499, and H.J. Mette in Lexikon des frühgriechischen Epos 1.81-19, citing Risch and Schwyzer.
The glossing derives from Apollonius the Sophist [Apollonius(11) in OCD(4)], Homeric Lexicon 3.1 (= Hesychius alpha205, and cf. Etymologicum Gudianum 3.25ff., Eustathius Commentary on Iliad 10.65), probably following Aristarchus, on Homer's plural.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:41:22.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered headword & translation, set keyword & status) on 1 February 2001@21:32:05.
Catharine Roth (added note) on 18 April 2002@19:41:48.
Robert Dyer (Expanded note and translation) on 14 January 2003@03:10:17.
Robert Dyer (corrected my error) on 14 January 2003@03:44:54.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 23 July 2003@06:39:42.
David Whitehead (tweaked hw and note, for clarity) on 21 December 2011@05:13:21.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 22 December 2011@19:19:18.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:22:55.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:14:44.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 15 December 2014@16:05:07.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 March 2015@22:46:35.

Headword: Ἀβρότη
Adler number: alpha,92
Translated headword: divine, holy
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. a term applied to] night.
Because it is deprived [a-] of people [brotoi].[1]
Greek Original:
Ἀβρότη: ἡ νύξ. παρὰ τὸ ἐστερῆσθαι βροτῶν.
Notes:
The headword occurs as an adjective describing night in Homer, Iliad 14.78 (web address 1). It recurs at Sophocles fr.269c 20 (of the darkness of death); and it is also a textual variant at (?)Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound 2 (applied to 'wilderness').
With the exception of this last instance (and contrary to the present entry), the word is best understood as a doublet for ἄμβροτος , 'immortal' (alpha 1540). See LSJ s.v. at web address 2.
[1] Addendum lacking, Adler reports, in mss AS.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:42:56.
Vetted by:
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@10:41:02.
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@10:52:34.
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@11:14:00.
Elizabeth Vandiver on 16 November 1999@14:44:14.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 1 February 2001@22:28:35.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 5 February 2003@09:56:18.
David Whitehead (tweaked hw; augmented notes; another keyword) on 21 December 2011@06:19:18.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 22 December 2011@19:26:00.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 4 October 2015@10:37:09.

Headword: Ἄβυδος
Adler number: alpha,101
Translated headword: Abudos, Abydos, Abydus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A city.[1]
The word is applied to an informant [συκοφάντης ] because of the common belief that the people of Abudos were informers.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] an adverb, Ἀβυδόθι , [meaning] in Abudos.[3]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] ἄΒυδον φλυαρίαν ["Abudos nonsense"], [meaning] great [nonsense].[4]
And [sc. attested is] Ἀβυδηνὸς , [meaning] he [who comes] from Abudos.[5]
Greek Original:
Ἄβυδος: πόλις. ἐπὶ συκοφάντου τάττεται ἡ λέξις, διὰ τὸ δοκεῖν συκοφάντας εἶναι τοὺς Ἀβυδηνούς. καὶ ἐπίρρημα, Ἀβυδόθι, ἐν Ἀβύδῳ. καὶ Ἄβυδον φλυαρίαν, τὴν πολλήν. καὶ Ἀβυδηνὸς, ὁ ἀπὸ Ἀβύδου.
Notes:
[1] = Lexicon Ambrosianum 82, according to Adler. In fact two cities of this name are known: one on the Asiatic shore of the Hellespont (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid G4; present-day Maltepe) and Abydos/Ebot in Upper Egypt (Barrington Atlas map 77 grid F4); without much doubt, the former is meant here. (In Hesychius alpha23 the gloss is fuller -- 'a Trojan city of the Hellespont'. Latte regards the entry as prompted by Homer, Iliad 2.836, accusative case, although similar wording appears in a late scholion to Iliad 17.584, where the adverbial derivative ἀβυδόθι appears -- see n. 3 below). See also alpha 100, sigma 465, and generally OCD(4) s.v.
[2] = the first sentence of Pausanias the Atticist alpha3 and Photius alpha63 Theodoridis; cf. also Zenobius 1.1, s.v. Ἀβυδηνὸν ἐπιφόρημα (alpha 100), and Kassel-Austin, PCG III.2 p.376 on Aristophanes fr. 755. See generally sigma 1330, sigma 1331, sigma 1332.
[3] Probably from commentary to Homer, Iliad 17.584, the only literary attestation of this adverb prior to Musaeus Grammaticus (5/6 CE); cf. Apollonius Dyscolus On Adverbs 2.1.1.164.
[4] = Synagoge Codex B alpha44, but in the better mss of Photius (Lexicon alpha64 Theodoridis) the adjective (in a nominative-case entry) is ἄβυθος ('bottomless'), surely correctly; cf. alpha 104. The ultimate source may be Plato, Parmenides 130D, though there too the text is uncertain: perhaps εἴς τιν' ἄβυθον φλυαρίαν (web address 1), though the alternatives include εἴς τινα βῦθον φλυαρίας . On the adjective ἄβυθος, a synonym for ἄβυσσος, see the LSJ entry at web address 2.
[5] There are many literary attestations of this form of the ethnic adjective (nominative singular masculine), beginning with Herodotus 4.138. For an instance in the Suda see pi 71.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; geography; law; philosophy; proverbs
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@13:59:06.
Vetted by:
Eric Nelson on 31 December 1999@21:07:09.
Ross Scaife ✝ (fixed keywords) on 2 March 2000@17:48:48.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; replaced existing note; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:05:35.
Jennifer Benedict (added links, betacode fix, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@00:03:03.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 18 April 2011@14:40:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 25 April 2011@04:09:51.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@09:19:59.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1) on 1 February 2012@05:52:37.
David Whitehead (expansions to notes) on 16 August 2013@07:33:01.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 4 July 2014@08:19:58.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:21:46.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:35:15.
David Whitehead (expanded n.2) on 22 December 2014@09:26:49.

Headword: Ἄβυσσον
Adler number: alpha,104
Translated headword: abyss
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] that which not even a deep [βυθός ] can contain; but Ionians pronounce βυθός as βυσσός .[1]
From which also βυσσοδομεύειν ["to build in the deep"] appears to be said,[2] from the verb δύνω ["I sink"] [meaning] I enter upon secretly, with a change [of initial consonant] [giving] βύω , βύσω , βέβυσμαι , βέβυσαι , [and the nouns] βυσός and ἀβύσσος [meaning] where no-one enters because of its depth.[3]
Aristophanes in Frogs [writes]: "for immediately you will come to a huge lake, an absolute abyss."[4] And he also uses the word in the neuter: "they shall not make peace while the measureless [ἄβυσσον ] silver is with the goddess on the Acropolis." For 1,000 talents were stored on the Acropolis.[5]
"Abyss" is what the Holy Scripture calls the watery substance. So since the land is surrounded on all sides by waters [and] by great and small seas, David naturally called this [i.e., abyss] the earth's surrounding garment.[6] Also, "abyss calls to abyss", the same prophet says,[7] meaning figuratively military divisions and the excessive size of the multitude.[8]
"I was under water as [if] in a kind of abyss."[9]
So an abyss [is] a great amount of water.
Greek Original:
Ἄβυσσον: ἣν οὐδὲ βυθὸς χωρῆσαι δύναται: Ἴωνες δὲ τὸν βυθὸν βυσσόν φασιν. ὅθεν δοκεῖ λέγεσθαι καὶ βυσσοδομεύειν, παρὰ τὸ δύνω, τὸ ὑπεισέρχομαι, κατὰ τροπὴν βύω, βύσω, βέβυσμαι, βέβυσαι, βυσὸς καὶ ἀβύσσος, οὗ οὐδεὶς εἰσέρχεται διὰ τὸ βάθος. Ἀριστοφάνης Βατράχοις: εὐθὺς γὰρ ἐπὶ λίμνην μεγάλην ἥξεις πάνυ ἄβυσσον. καὶ οὐδετέρως φησὶν ὁ αὐτός: ἕως ἂν ᾖ τὸ ἀργύριον τὸ ἄβυσσον παρὰ τῇ θεῷ, οὐκ εἰρηνεύσουσιν. ἐν γὰρ τῇ ἀκροπόλει χίλια τάλαντα ἀπέκειτο. Ἄβυσσον καλεῖ τὴν ὑγρὰν οὐσίαν ἡ θεία γραφή. ἐπεὶ οὖν ἡ γῆ πανταχόθεν ὕδασι περιέχεται μεγάλοις καὶ μικροῖς πελάγεσιν, εἰκότως περιβόλαιον αὐτῆς εἴρηκεν ὁ Δαβίδ. καὶ, ἄβυσσος ἄβυσσον ἐπικαλεῖται, ὁ αὐτὸς προφήτης φησίν: τὰ στρατιωτικὰ λέγων τάγματα καὶ τὴν τοῦ πλήθους ὑπερβολὴν τροπικῶς. ὡς ἐν ἀβύσσῳ τινὶ ὑποβρύχιος ἐγενόμην. Ἄβυσσος οὖν ὑδάτων πλῆθος πολύ.
Notes:
See also alpha 105.
[1] This comment on Ionian pronunciation comes from the scholiast on Aristophanes, Frogs 138, quoted later in the entry.
[2] In Homer, Odyssey, where βυσσοδομεύω occurs most frequently, it has the sense "brood over."
[3] cf. Etymologicum Magnum 4.44. These are principal parts of the verb βύω , which means "to stuff," followed by βυσός , which does not exist according to LSJ. Probably this is a mistake for βυσσός , "depth of the sea" (cf. beta 598, βυσσόν ). The Suda generally has little concern for the distinction between single and double consonants. The author thus seems to propose a very dubious etymology: that ἀ-βυσσος literally means "unstuffable" -- i.e., unable to be entered. [Ms M (= Marcianus 448) omits this sentence.]
[4] Aristophanes, Frogs 137-8 (web address 1).
[5] "Silver" [ἀργύριον ] is a neuter noun in Greek, while lake [λίμνη ] in the previous sentence is feminine; the point is that the same form ἄβυσσον is used with both. The sentence quoted here is actually part of a scholion to Aristophanes, Lysistrata 173 (web address 2); Aristophanes uses the phrase τὸ ἀργύριον τὸ ἄβυσσον in that line itself.
[6] Psalm 103:6 LXX. See again under pi 1083.
[7] Psalm 41:8 LXX.
[8] Referring to the continuation of Psalm 41:8 LXX, "all thy waves and thy billows are gone over me" (KJV).
[9] From Theodoret's commentary (PG 80.1173) on Psalm 41:8 LXX.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: Christianity; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; epic; geography; history; imagery; military affairs; proverbs; religion
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:02:02.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, added keywords, set status) on 5 February 2001@11:48:31.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@08:11:37.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 4 July 2003@08:14:49.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added links; cosmetics) on 14 December 2003@15:22:17.
David Whitehead (modified translation and notes 6-9) on 28 April 2004@11:16:41.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@00:15:00.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 19 April 2011@18:23:25.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 25 April 2011@04:11:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and note, after consulting with the translator) on 26 April 2011@17:14:37.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@03:45:27.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 21 November 2014@10:58:29.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 21 November 2014@11:44:30.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:36:21.

Headword: Ἀγαθοὶ δ' ἀριδάκρυες ἄνδρες
Adler number: alpha,126
Translated headword: tearful men are good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In reference to those who are strongly inclined toward pity.
Greek Original:
Ἀγαθοὶ δ' ἀριδάκρυες ἄνδρες: ἐπὶ τῶν σφόδρα πρὸς ἔλεον ῥεπόντων.
Note:
Same entry in Photius, and the same or very similar ones in the paroemiographers. This version of the proverb is the second half of a line of hexameter verse (complete with the particle δ' ); there are slight variants in (e.g.) the scholia to Homer, Iliad 1.349.
Keywords: daily life; epic; ethics; poetry; proverbs
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:57:53.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 2 April 2001@04:49:39.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@08:02:14.
David Whitehead (augmented note; another keyword) on 22 December 2011@07:50:50.

Headword: Ἀγακλειτός
Adler number: alpha,127
Translated headword: celebrated, very famous
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
He who has an exceedingly fine reputation.[1] And [sc. attested is the feminine] αγακλειτη .[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀγακλειτός: ὁ ἄγαν ἔνδοξος. καὶ Ἀγακλειτή.
Notes:
Epic & tragic adjective: LSJ entry at web address 1.
[1] Same glossing, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (130); see also Hesychius s.v. ἀγάκλειτοι , and the scholia to Homer, Iliad 3.59.
[2] Homer, Iliad 18.45 (of the Nereid Galateia).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@01:00:32.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (added link) on 2 April 2001@10:25:50.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@04:01:01.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding) on 26 March 2008@00:49:03.
David Whitehead (another note; another keyword; cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@07:33:11.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword) on 22 December 2011@08:26:00.

Headword: Ἄγαλμα
Adler number: alpha,131
Translated headword: decoration, delight, ornament, statue
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Anything in which someone takes delight.[1]
"And he [A] gives silver, so that he [B] might complete the statue with the utmost artisanry, adding the size and prescribing the nature of the stone."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἄγαλμα: πᾶν ἐφ' ᾧ τις ἀγάλλεται. καὶ δίδωσιν ἀργύριον, ἵνα ἐκπονήσῃ τὸ ἄγαλμα ἄκρας τέχνης, προσθεὶς τὸ μέγεθος καὶ προσειπὼν τῆς λίθου τὴν φύσιν.
Notes:
See also alpha 132, alpha 133, alpha 135, alpha 136.
[1] Again under alpha 133. Also in Photius, other lexica, and various scholia (e.g. to Homer, Odyssey 8.509, and Aristophanes, Wasps 303).
[2] Aelian fr. 65b Domingo-Forasté (part of 62 Hercher), on an unscrupulous (but unnamed) sculptor.
Keywords: art history; comedy; definition; economics; epic; ethics; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: William Hutton on 22 June 2000@01:06:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@09:59:18.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 18 February 2011@06:57:00.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@03:46:34.
Catharine Roth (updated reference in note 2) on 28 January 2012@19:11:34.

Headword: Ἀγάλματα
Adler number: alpha,133
Translated headword: delights, ornaments, statues
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the likenesses of the gods, and anything that is decorative in some way. Homer [writes]: "but it is stored away as a delight for the king."[1] And Hesiod calls a necklace an "ornament";[2] but Pindar uses this term for the decoration on a tomb,[3] and Euripides uses it for the adornments for corpses.[4]
Also something in which someone takes delight.[5]
Also [sc. a term for] image, wooden statue, delight, beauty, ornament, source of pride, palm leaves,[6] [human] statues, [honorific?] inscriptions.
Paintings and [human] statues are also called agalmata.[7]
agalmation [is] the diminutive form.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάλματα: τὰ τῶν θεῶν μιμήματα, καὶ πάντα τὰ κόσμου τινὸς μετέχοντα. Ὅμηρος: βασιλῆϊ δὲ κεῖται ἄγαλμα. καὶ Ἡσίοδος τὸν ὅρμον ἄγαλμα καλεῖ: Πίνδαρος δὲ τὴν ἐπὶ τάφου στήλην οὕτω καλεῖ, Εὐριπίδης τὸν ἐπὶ νεκροῖς κόσμον. καὶ ἐφ' ᾧ τις ἀγάλλεται. καὶ τὸ εἴδωλον, βρέτας, χάρμα, καλλονὴ, κόσμος, καύχημα, θαλλοὶ, ἀνδριάντες, ἐπιγραφαί. Ἀγάλματα δὲ καὶ τὰς γραφὰς καὶ τοὺς ἀνδριάντας λέγουσιν. Ἀγαλμάτιον δὲ ὑποκοριστικῶς.
Notes:
The (neuter) headword is the plural of alpha 131 (and cf. alpha 132). It is perhaps, though not necessarily, quoted from somewhere.
[1] Homer, Iliad 4.144 (web address 1), on an ivory cheek-piece for a horse.
[2] This fragment of Hesiod (142 Merkelbach-West, 233 Rzach) is not known from any other source. It may pertain to the story of Europa in the Catalogue of Women.
[3] Pindar, Nemean Odes 10.125 (67 Bowra): web address 2.
[4] Euripides, Alcestis 613: web address 3.
[5] Already at alpha 131.
[6] Used as prizes for victors in competition.
[7] Same material in Photius (Lexicon alpha92 Theodoridis) and elsewhere; cf. Kassel-Austin, PCG II p.365 (on Antiphanes fr.102).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: art history; athletics; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology; poetry; religion; trade and manufacture; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 12 January 1999@12:39:04.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (cosmetics) on 29 June 2000@22:39:50.
David Whitehead (augmented keywords; cosmetics) on 17 February 2003@05:54:38.
Jennifer Benedict (cleaned up links) on 26 March 2008@01:00:28.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:07:43.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7) on 16 August 2013@07:56:54.
David Whitehead (expanded n.7; another keyword) on 22 December 2014@04:58:33.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 6 November 2016@12:23:04.

Headword: Ἄγαμαι καρδίας
Adler number: alpha,138
Translated headword: I admire at heart
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
An Atticism, meaning I marvel [at].[1]
Aelian [writes]: "since, also, the [behaviour? remark?] of Menelaus to Paris the son of Priam I neither praise nor admire."[2]
"Personally I admire these men as well, and the Acarnanian most of all above these men. For he was eager to share with his men the things that he recognized they were going to suffer."[3]
Greek Original:
Ἄγαμαι καρδίας: Ἀττικῶς, ἀντὶ τοῦ θαυμάζω. Αἰλιανός: ἐπεὶ καὶ τὴν τοῦ Μενέλεω πρὸς τὸν τοῦ Πριάμου Πάριν οὔτε ἐπαινῶ οὔτε ἄγαμαι. ἐγὼ δὲ ἄγαμαι καὶ τούσδε τοὺς ἄνδρας: τὸν δὲ Ἀκαρνᾶνα μέγιστον καὶ πρὸ τούτων. ἃ γὰρ πεισομένους ἐγίνωσκε, τούτων ἐπεθύμησε τοῖς ἀνδράσι κοινωνῆσαι.
Notes:
[1] The headword phrase occurs at Aristophanes, Acharnians 489 (web address 1). For the comment, cf. Timaeus, Platonic Lexicon s.v. ἄγαμι .
[2] Aelian fr.125b Domingo-Forasté (122 Hercher). The allusion is presumably to something in Homer, Iliad 3 (where Menelaus and Paris fight a duel).
[3] Philostratus, Life of Apollonius of Tyana 4.23; again (in part) at alpha 805.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; mythology
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@00:16:18.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:39:43.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 25 April 2002@04:09:53.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; augmented n.2 and keywords) on 22 December 2006@08:55:11.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@01:04:38.
David Whitehead (tweaks and cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@04:57:51.
Catharine Roth (updated reference, upgraded link) on 28 January 2012@19:23:05.
Catharine Roth (tweak) on 21 December 2014@19:38:34.

Headword: Ἀγάννιφον
Adler number: alpha,144
Translated headword: very snowy
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Homer [sc. uses this adjective, when mentioning] the extremely snow-covered mountain.
Greek Original:
Ἀγάννιφον: Ὅμηρος, τὸ ὄρος τὸ λίαν χιονιζόμενον.
Notes:
Homer, Iliad 1.420 (web address 1 below) and again at 18.186 (web address 2).
From *aga-snighw-; cf. nu 294, nu 436.
Likewise or similarly in other lexica; references at Photius alpha105 Theodoridis.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; geography
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@23:08:31.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:59:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 19 December 2003@16:25:20.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 21 December 2003@06:26:33.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@01:07:31.
David Whitehead (another note and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@05:32:38.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:08:13.

Headword: Ἀγανοφροσύνη
Adler number: alpha,147
Translated headword: kindliness, kind-mindedness
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] mildness, gentleness.
Greek Original:
Ἀγανοφροσύνη: προσήνεια, πραότης.
Notes:
(For this headword see already under alpha 145.)
Same or similar entry in other lexica (references at Photius alpha106 Theodoridis), and see also the scholia to Homer, Iliad 24.772, where the headword occurs in the dative case.
Keywords: definition; epic; ethics
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2000@08:37:38.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note) on 9 February 2001@11:15:46.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 23 December 2011@05:50:41.
David Whitehead on 23 December 2011@05:51:01.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:09:26.

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