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Headword: *)aage/s
Adler number: alpha,2
Translated headword: unbroken, unbreakable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] unshattered,[1] strong.
Greek Original:
*)aage/s: a)/qrauston, i)sxuro/n.
Notes:
= Apollonius Sophistes, Lexicon Homericum 2.4. Likewise in Hesychius alpha7; Photius, Lexicon alpha4 Theodoridis; Etymologicum Gudianum 1.12. This form of the adjective is the neuter nominative/accusative singular, as at Homer, Odyssey 11.575 (web address 1).
All but the last word of this entry is absent from ms M (= Marcianus 448), as are the last several words of alpha 1 (a and b).
[1] cf. alpha 750.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:55:22.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised status) on 26 September 2000@13:50:00.
Ross Scaife ✝ (testing) on 22 June 2001@13:33:15.
Catharine Roth (added link and keywords) on 6 March 2002@00:09:12.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@09:58:28.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added keyword, set status) on 19 August 2007@10:53:47.
David Whitehead (restored lost keywords) on 19 August 2007@11:26:45.
William Hutton (augmented headword) on 20 August 2007@08:18:48.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:09:21.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:45:02.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 16 December 2011@11:36:59.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@05:57:53.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note) on 22 January 2024@00:54:55.

Headword: *)aadei=n
Adler number: alpha,3
Translated headword: to disturb
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to harass, to be at a loss, to be treated unjustly,[1] to go hungry.
Greek Original:
*)aadei=n: o)xlei=n, a)porei=n, a)dikei=sqai, a)sitei=n.
Notes:
Same entry in other lexica: Apollonius' Homeric Lexicon (2.14), Hesychius alpha10, Photius alpha5 Theodoridis, and cf. Etymologicum Gudianum 1.15. The headword is otherwise unattested -- and the range of active and passive meanings suggests that the lexicographers may have been guessing at a meaning, perhaps on the basis of the (not improbable, but see Chantraine s.v. a)ada) etymology of a-privative + a(d- ('please', 'delight').
[1] This third gloss is absent from ms M (= Marcianus 448).
Reference:
P. Chantraine, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque, ed. 2 Paris 2009.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@08:53:07.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised vetting status) on 26 September 2000@14:27:33.
David Whitehead (changed keyword; added note) on 27 February 2003@07:06:07.
William Hutton (augmented notes, added keywords, set status) on 19 August 2007@12:29:45.
William Hutton (typo) on 19 August 2007@17:07:52.
William Hutton (modified note) on 20 August 2007@08:24:19.
William Hutton (added note) on 20 August 2007@08:25:47.
William Hutton on 20 August 2007@08:38:45.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode) on 22 March 2008@17:11:48.
Jennifer Benedict (tweak to note) on 24 March 2008@23:12:53.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:46:40.
Catharine Roth (added bibliography) on 1 January 2012@23:17:55.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:02:40.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 18 December 2014@22:28:37.

Headword: *)aa/sai
Adler number: alpha,8
Translated headword: to harm, to infatuate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
has four meanings: to glut,[1] to go to sleep,[2] to harm, to cause pain.
Greek Original:
*)aa/sai te/ssara shmai/nei: kore/sai, kaqupnw=sai, bla/yai, luph=sai.
Notes:
The headword is aorist active infinitive, glossed with four others. The entry = Photius, Lexicon alpha9 Theodoridis, and similar material can be found in Synagoge (Codex B) alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.5-7). Compare also Etymologicum Gudianum 1.8. This particular form is unattested outside lexicography, though it appears as an entry in Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.5, and is presumably related to such Homeric forms as we find at alpha 7.
[1] This meaning is unattested for the verb a)a/w (LSJ entry at web address 1), except that the verb is used for the effect of overindulgence in wine.
[2] In that one loses consciousness and control in sleep, as in Homer Odyssey 10.68 (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:55:13.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Translated headword, changed status) on 17 October 2000@17:24:27.
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 2 August 2004@09:47:05.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, added links and keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@05:15:27.
William Hutton (typo) on 20 August 2007@09:12:24.
William Hutton on 8 November 2007@06:10:34.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:13:46.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:08:03.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation and note) on 1 February 2024@01:06:09.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note) on 9 February 2024@01:16:39.

Headword: *)abba=
Adler number: alpha,10
Translated headword: Abba, Father
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The ancients called God "Father" from a feeling of relationship. Moses said, "You have forsaken God who begot you."[1] And Malachi: "One God begot us and is our father."[2] They were in a state of grace, moved by the force of the Spirit. Just as there is the Spirit of wisdom by which fools have become wise (for this is clear from the teachings), and the Spirit of power by which they raised both the weak and the dead, and the Spirit of prophecy, and the Spirit of tongues, so also there is the Spirit of adoption.[3] And just as we know the Spirit of prophecy, through which one who has it is moved by grace to tell the future, so also the Spirit of adoption, through which one moved by the Spirit calls God "Father." One who wishes to show that this is most legitimate even used a Hebrew word. For he did not say "Father" but "Abba the Father." This is the word used especially by legitimate children for their father.[4]
Greek Original:
*)abba=: o( path/r. oi( me\n palaioi\ e)ka/loun pate/ra to\n qeo\n e)c oi)kei/as dianoi/as, w(s *mwu+sh=s: qeo\n to\n gennh/santa/ se e)gkate/lipes: kai\ *malaxi/as: o( qeo\s ei(=s e)ge/nnhsen h(ma=s kai\ path/r: oi( de\ e)n xa/riti, a)po\ pneumatikh=s e)nergei/as kinou/menoi. w(/sper pneu=ma sofi/as ei)=nai, kaq' o(\ sofoi\ oi( a)/sofoi e)ge/nonto [kai\ dhlou=tai tou=to a)po\ th=s didaskali/as] kai\ pneu=ma duna/mews ei)=nai, kaq' o(\ kai\ a)sqenei=s kai\ nekrou\s h)/geiron, kai\ pneu=ma profhtei/as, kai\ pneu=ma glwssw=n, ou(/tw kai\ pneu=ma ui(oqesi/as. kai\ w(/sper i)/smen to\ pneu=ma th=s profhtei/as, a)f' w(=n o( e)/xwn au)to\ le/gei ta\ me/llonta u(po\ th=s xa/ritos kinou/menos, ou(/tw dh\ kai\ pneu=ma ui(oqesi/as, a)f' ou(= o( labw\n pate/ra kalei= to\n qeo\n, u(po\ pneu/matos kinou/menos. o( dh\ boulo/menos dei=cai gnhsiw/taton o)\n kai\ th=| tw=n *(ebrai/wn e)xrh/sato glw/tth|. ou) ga\r ei)=pen o( path\r, a)ll' a)bba= o( path/r: o(/per tw=n pai/dwn ma/lista/ e)sti tw=n gnhsi/wn pro\s pate/ra r(h=ma.
Notes:
A paraphrase of St. John Chrysostom, Homily on the Epistle to the Romans PG 60.527.
(Entry placed after alpha 16, Adler reports, in mss GTMB.)
[1] Deuteronomy 32:18 LXX (web address 1).
[2] An approximation of Malachi 2:10 LXX (web address 2).
[3] cf. Ep.Romans 8:15 (web address 3).
[4] On "Abba," see also alpha 12.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: children; Christianity; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; medicine; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:57:30.
Vetted by:
Samuel Huskey (added links to Bible, changed "sonship" to "filiation") on 15 July 2000@15:01:55.
Catharine Roth (Altered wording.) on 29 July 2000@23:15:23.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 11 July 2003@08:51:36.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 6 October 2005@08:51:18.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, augmented notes, fixed broken links, added keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@10:15:40.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 5 August 2013@01:15:24.
David Whitehead (another note; cosmetics) on 28 March 2014@06:14:49.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation, added cross-reference) on 28 March 2014@12:15:01.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:24:11.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note 2) on 9 February 2024@01:30:43.

Headword: *)aba/khsan
Adler number: alpha,11
Translated headword: they kept quiet
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] they were unaware, they did not understand.
Greek Original:
*)aba/khsan: h)gno/hsan, h)sune/thsan.
Note:
The headword is the third person plural, aorist indicative active, of a)bake/w. This form is found only in Homer, Odyssey 4.249 (web address 1), and the many lexicographical notices generated by it. Of those the most similar to this entry are Photius, Lexicon alpha22 Theodoridis, and Etymologicum Magnum 2.30-31. Compare also Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.16; Hesychius alpha54. The glosses offered here and elsewhere probably represent semantic extrapolation from the Homeric context: When Odysseus comes in disguise to Troy, Helen knows who he is but the rest of the people in Troy a)ba/khsan. The translation of the headword, on the other hand, reflects the verb's probable etymological connection with the verb ba/zw 'speak', and the adjective a)bakh/s ('speechless', 'tranquil'). Cf. Chantraine s.v. a)bakh/s, a connection that is sometimes mentioned as a possibility in the ancient scholarship.
Reference:
P. Chantraine, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque, ed. 2. Paris 2009.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:58:43.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Altered wording, added note and link.) on 29 July 2000@23:31:10.
David Whitehead (expanded note; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@10:04:22.
Catharine Roth (modified link, added betacode, raised status) on 26 November 2006@23:52:21.
William Hutton (modified headword, augmented note) on 21 August 2007@09:45:37.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:27:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:20:49.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:10:41.
Catharine Roth (added bibliography) on 9 February 2024@01:34:11.

Headword: *)abbakou/m
Adler number: alpha,12
Translated headword: Habakkuk, Abbakoum, Avvakoum
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[A name meaning] father of awakening. For the [word] abba means father,[1] and koum means awakening.[2] So also in the Holy Gospel: "Talitha, koum," that is, "young girl, get up."[3] From which [it is] clear that Abbakoum must be written with double b.[4]
Greek Original:
*)abbakou/m: path\r e)ge/rsews. to\ me\n ga\r a)bba= shmai/nei path/r, to\ de\ kou\m e)/gersis: w(s kai\ para\ tw=| qei/w| eu)aggeli/w|: talhqa\, kou/m, h)/goun h( pai=s e)gei/rou. o(/qen dh=lon, o(/ti dia\ tw=n du/o bb grapte/on to\ *)abbakou/m.
Notes:
An etymology for the name of the prophet Habakkuk (in the Septuagint, Ambakoum or Avvakoum), based on two Aramaic words found in the New Testament. The Suda is drawing from older onomastica; the same etymology is found in the Origenistic lexicon (see bibliography).
[1] See already alpha 10. The Hebrew/Aramaic אבּא abba means "father".
[2] The Hebrew/Aramaic קום kūm means "arise"; it can also be used to mean "awake".
[3] Mark 5:41 (web address 1); not in the other Gospels, but several times in patristic literature.
[4] The Suda is correct. The doubling of the בּ is indicated by its dot (dagesh); unlike Greek, Hebrew and Aramaic do not replicate doubled letters.
Reference:
Paul de Lagarde, Onomastica Sacra, p. 200, line 14-15
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: children; Christianity; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; imagery; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:59:43.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Altered wording.) on 29 July 2000@23:23:46.
Catharine Roth (Augmented note with information supplied by Lee Fields.) on 1 May 2001@19:02:40.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@10:07:42.
Raphael Finkel (Added notes 2, 4, Hebrew.) on 12 August 2004@14:47:21.
Catharine Roth (added a keyword) on 8 October 2005@00:31:59.
William Hutton (cosmetics, added keywords and link, set status) on 21 August 2007@09:59:47.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:27:14.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:23:06.
David Whitehead (another keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:27:45.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 18 December 2011@10:53:04.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@01:12:51.
Raphael Finkel (Converted Romanization of Hebrew to ISO 259.) on 7 August 2014@13:38:11.
David Whitehead (expanded a note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@08:48:00.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@06:56:57.
Catharine Roth (added punctuation in notes) on 9 February 2024@01:37:17.
Catharine Roth (another headword transliteration) on 17 February 2024@00:45:15.

Headword: *)aba/le
Adler number: alpha,13
Translated headword: would that
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] o that.[1] "Would that [...]."[2]
Greek Original:
*)aba/le: ei)/qe a)ba/le.
Notes:
For the headword see LSJ s.v. a)/bale (web address 1). The entry = Photius, Lexicon alpha26 Theodoridis, and, with the exception of the repetition of the headword within the entry (see note 2), also Synagoge alpha1 (Lexica Segueriana 3.10), Hesychius (s.v. a)/ ba/le, alpha60) and Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.15. The word does not occur in the extant text of Homer, but there are other literary attestations including Callimachus fr. 619 Pfeiffer, and Greek Anthology 7.583.1 (Agathias Scholasticus).
cf. generally alpha 14.
[1] For more on ei)/qe see epsiloniota 55.
[2] Apparently the beginning of a quotation, perhaps from one of the works mentioned above; otherwise the repetition of the headword is hard to explain. See Theodoridis' note.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:45:11.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:23:01.
David Whitehead (modified translation; supplied note) on 2 August 2004@10:13:43.
William Hutton (rearranged translation and notes, added link and keywords, set status) on 22 August 2007@11:14:02.
William Hutton on 22 August 2007@11:17:12.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 23 August 2007@10:04:46.
William Hutton (corrected and updated references in footnote) on 8 November 2007@06:13:12.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:29:07.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:32:04.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 18 December 2011@10:54:34.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:14:01.
Ronald Allen (typo in n.2) on 13 August 2018@21:59:26.

Headword: *)/abalen
Adler number: alpha,14
Translated headword: threw
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[a)/balen is found] meaning e)/balen.
Greek Original:
*)/abalen: a)nti\ tou= e)/balen.
Note:
Likewise in other lexica; see the references at Photius alpha27 Theodoridis. The headword variant -- for the aorist indicative active of ba/llw, third person singular -- is otherwise unattested.
Keyword: dialects, grammar, and etymology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:46:22.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified note, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:28:41.
Robert Dyer (Added a reference to the form of the Headword with a different accent, and another Keyword. Raised status.) on 9 February 2002@15:59:31.
David Whitehead (x-ref; cosmetics) on 2 August 2004@10:16:30.
Catharine Roth (tweaks) on 20 December 2010@22:16:54.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 18 December 2011@10:33:55.
Catharine Roth (punctuation) on 18 December 2011@10:56:45.
David Whitehead (streamlined note) on 16 August 2013@06:21:47.

Headword: *)/abaptos
Adler number: alpha,17
Translated headword: untempered
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] most/very unsharpened.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the superlative] a)bapto/tatos.[2]
Greek Original:
*)/abaptos: a)stomw/tatos. kai\ *)abapto/tatos.
Notes:
The headword is unattested outside lexicography.
[1] Similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha28 Theodoridis), except that the original form of the gloss, in Cyril, seems simply to be a)sto/mwtos ('unsharpened'), not this superlative of a different but potentially synonymous adjective a)/stomos. Cyril's reading has been adopted in Latte's text of Hesychius and Theodoridis' of Photius.
[2] Only in ms A (= Parisinus 2625). This superlative form of the headword is attested only here.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; science and technology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:54:56.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified note, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:59:20.
David Whitehead (another note; betacoding and other cosmetics) on 9 November 2005@09:22:26.
William Hutton (augmented notes, set status) on 24 August 2007@04:43:34.
William Hutton (tweaks) on 24 August 2007@04:54:57.
William Hutton (betacode fix) on 30 August 2007@04:50:05.
William Hutton (modified note) on 8 November 2007@06:44:00.
Jennifer Benedict (ms. cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:52:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 18 December 2011@10:37:33.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:28:44.

Headword: *)abasa/nistos
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
*)abasa/nistos: a)gu/mnastos h)\ a)nece/tastos, a)doki/mastos. ei)/rhtai de\ a)po\ th=s basa/nou th=s xrusoxoi+kh=s li/qou, e)n h(=| dokima/zousi to\ xrusi/on. e)xrh/sato de\ *ai)liano\s e)n tw=| peri\ pronoi/as tw=| a)basa/nistos a)nti\ tou= a)/neu o)du/nhs.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] *ba/sanos can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 18 February 2024@01:52:52.

Headword: *)abaxqanh=
Adler number: alpha,24
Translated headword: abakhthani
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A Hebrew expression.
Greek Original:
*)abaxqanh=: le/cis *(ebrai+kh/.
Notes:
Strictly speaking the headword is a truncated Aramaic, rather than Hebrew, term. Its proper form in Greek transliteration is sabaxqa/ni and translates "you have forsaken me." The term occurs at Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34, where Jesus on the cross quotes Psalm 21:2 LXX (22:2 MT): "God, my God, ... why have you forsaken me?" (see eta 210). For the Hebrew, see Kohlenberger, 3.367. In Aramaic, "why have you forsaken me" is למא שבקתני lama šaḇaqtani. The Suda has carelessly disassociated the sigma, creating in effect "lamas aḇaqtani or a)baxqanh--a clear signal that the compiler was unfamiliar with Aramaic. The Psalmic Hebrew original is עזבתני 'azaḇtani, from עזב ʿazaḇ "forsake, forget". For the triliteral root citation, see Brown, Driver, and Briggs, 736ff. For šaḇaqtani (from שבק šeḇaq), see Perschbacher, 364; Danker, 909.
The Suda item has a circumflex accent on the final syllable. In the Hebrew עזבתני ʿazaḇtani, the accent falls on the penultimate syllable (-ta-), consistent with perfects suffixed with a first person singular pronoun; for this, see Kelley, 154.A; Gesenius, 155(58.1). So in the Aramaic, the accent falls on the penultimate syllable (-ta-). That said, the accent in Greek transliteration is inconsistent. Perschbacher places it over the final iota (sabaxqani/) in the headword; however, his citation from The Greek New Testament According to the Majority Text (1982) places the accent over the penultimate (sabaxqa/ni). In addition, Perschbacher offers the transliteration sabaxqanei/ from The New Testament in the Original Greek (1881). Danker places the accent over the penultimate syllable.
Phonologically, the Aramaic shin (ש š /ʃ/) cannot be accommodated by Greek, which must substitute sigma. For a parallel instance, see omega 182 (note 47). Both chi (for Aramaic ק qaf) and theta (for Aramaic ת taw) function as aspirated plosives (equivalent to English "kit" and "top"). See Allen, 16-17. The theta is noteworthy insofar as its sound value parallels that of the taw (ת) in šaḇaqtani, hardened by silent shewa and dagesh lene. Moreover, the Aramaic in Greek transliteration bolsters the linguistic argument for the compound "chi-theta" as successive aspirated plosives. See Allen, 24-27. Aramaic taw, like its Hebrew counterpart, otherwise has a "th" (as in "both") value. See "Aramaic" in Encyclopaedia Judaica, 3.263; a modern descriptive approach is found in "Aramaic" (Kaufman). For theta as a fricative in Hebrew transliteration, see omega 182 (note 47).
That the Suda terminates the headword with eta rather than iota (paralleling the Aramaic khireq-yod or long "i") showcases a phonological shift in Greek. By the 3rd century CE, the Greek letters eta, and the digraph epsilon-iota (note the -ei alternative in Perschbacher) were sounded like iota. See Allen, 74. The Suda compiler viewed eta as the more elegant solution. This feature bears directly on the Suda's own taxonomy: the homophones epsilon-iota, eta, and iota follow zeta in the Suda's alphabetical scheme (antistoichia). See "Suidas" in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, XXVI.51.
References:
Allen, W.S. Vox Graeca. Cambridge: Cambridge University, 1968
"Aramaic" in Encyclopaedia Judaica. Jerusalem: Encyclopaedia Judaica, 1973
Brown, F., Driver, S.R., and Briggs, C.A. A Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament. Oxford: Clarendon, 1951
Danker, F.W. A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2000
Kautzsch, E. Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar. Oxford: Clarendon, 1910
Kelley, P.H. Biblical Hebrew: An Introductory Grammar. Grand Rapids: William B. Erdmans, 1992
Kohlenberger, J.R. The Interlinear Hebrew-English Old Testament. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1987
Kaufman, S.A. "Aramaic" in Hetzron, R. The Semitic Languages. New York: Routledge, 1997
Perschbacher, W.J. The New Analytical Greek Lexicon. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1996
"Suidas" in Encyclopaedia Britannica. Cambridge: Cambridge University, 1910
Keywords: Christianity; chronology; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 4 December 1999@16:23:20.
Vetted by:
Raphael Finkel on 9 December 1999@11:17:30.
Elizabeth Vandiver on 14 December 1999@16:17:44.
Craig Miller on 27 May 2002@01:29:46.
Craig Miller (Reformatted translation; modified/expanded notes; added bibliography; expanded keywords. Cosmetics pending by editor.) on 27 May 2002@01:58:58.
Craig Miller (Cosmetics) on 27 May 2002@15:48:11.
Craig Miller on 27 May 2002@16:11:44.
Catharine Roth (added cross-reference) on 4 October 2002@00:55:00.
Raphael Finkel (Added Hebrew and Aramaic characters.) on 31 October 2002@10:06:56.
Raphael Finkel (Minor fixes.) on 31 October 2002@12:39:23.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added italics; cosmetics) on 12 February 2005@21:58:54.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 1 March 2006@01:08:11.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@06:21:33.
Catharine Roth (coding, typo) on 5 August 2013@00:57:53.
Raphael Finkel (Fixed translation of LXX; changed to ISO 259 Romanization of Hebrew and Aramaic.) on 7 August 2014@13:30:23.
Raphael Finkel (Standardized Romanization fonts.) on 7 August 2014@13:46:48.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:25:56.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note) on 19 February 2024@00:35:25.
Catharine Roth on 19 February 2024@00:43:40.

Headword: *)abde/lukta
Adler number: alpha,25
Translated headword: unhateful [things]
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those which do not cause pollution, at which one would not feel disgust or hatred. The word [is] somewhat tragic.[1] Aeschylus in Myrmidons [writes]: "indeed, for I love them, they are unhateful to me."[2]
Greek Original:
*)abde/lukta: ta\ mh\ miai/nonta, a(\ ou)k a)/n tis bdeluxqei/h kai\ dusxera/neie. tragikwte/ra de\ h( le/cis. *ai)sxu/los *murmido/si: kai\ mh\n, filw= ga\r, a)bde/lukt' e)moi\ ta/de.
Notes:
The headword, presumably extracted from the quotation given, is neuter plural of this adjective.
cf. generally (by way of opposites) beta 197, beta 198, beta 199, beta 200, beta 201, etc.
= Photius, Lexicon alpha33 Theodoridis (Phrynichus, Praeparatio Sophistica fr. 40), and very similar to Synagoge (Codex B) alpha12; cf. Hesychius alpha94.
[1] cf. tau 659.
[2] Aeschylus fr. 137 Nauck.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:23:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:42:07.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmnented notes; cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:40:31.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:28:36.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:38.
William Hutton (Augmented and modified notes) on 11 November 2007@07:20:53.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks) on 19 December 2011@06:28:05.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:35:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:31:12.

Headword: *)/abdhra
Adler number: alpha,26
Translated headword: Abdera
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The sea, and a name of a city[1] and 'Abderite' [is] the citizen [of it].[2]
Also Phalera and Kythera [sc. are spelled with eta]; but Gadeira, Stageira, Topeira, and Dobeira [sc. are spelled with epsiloniota].[3]
Greek Original:
*)/abdhra: h( qa/lassa, kai\ o)/noma po/lews kai\ *)abdhri/ths o( poli/ths. kai\ *fa/lhra kai\ *ku/qhra. *ga/deira de\ kai\ *sta/geira kai\ *to/peira kai\ *do/beira.
Notes:
[1] Actually, as Stephanus of Byzantium and others noted, there were two cities called Abdera: one, the present-day Avdira, in northern Greece (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid D3; RE I.22-23; OCD(4) s.v.); the other, the present-day Adra, in southern Spain (Barrington Atlas map 27 grid B5). But the idea of Abdera as 'the sea' is unintelligible.
[2] Similarly glossed in the Etymologicum Magnum and the Lexicon Ambrosianum. An "Abderite" could also signify someone generically stupid: see LSJ s.v. *)abdhri/ths (web address 1 below).
[3] These six city-names (whether spelled with an eta, like Abdera, or epsilon-iota; there would have been little difference in pronounciation by the time of the Suda) generate an ethnikon in the same way. See also delta 1318, sigma 977. This part of the entry, Adler reports, is lacking in mss A (= Parisinus 2625), G (= Parisinus 2623), and T (= Vaticanus 881).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:24:49.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added note.) on 30 July 2000@22:42:39.
David Whitehead (modified translation and notes) on 18 September 2000@05:28:33.
William Hutton (Cosmetics) on 20 January 2001@23:00:39.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added cross-reference, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:38:55.
Catharine Roth (punctuation) on 4 October 2007@10:32:59.
David Whitehead (augmented n.1 (and corrected note numbering)) on 5 October 2007@03:15:34.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:58:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@06:31:43.
Catharine Roth (betacode cosmetics) on 20 December 2011@15:48:25.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@03:47:11.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:08:37.
Catharine Roth (coding, tweaked link) on 30 March 2022@17:58:35.

Headword: *)abe/baios
Adler number: alpha,28
Translated headword: unreliable, unsteady
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning he who/that which is] unstable and easily overturned.
Greek Original:
*)abe/baios: o( a)staqh\s kai\ eu)meta/treptos.
Notes:
Entry not paralleled in other lexica.
cf. alpha 4345, epsilon 2557, pi 88.
Keywords: definition; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:26:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set keyword and status) on 20 January 2001@23:04:33.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 21 January 2001@01:32:39.
David Whitehead (added x-refs; cosmetics) on 9 June 2003@07:11:20.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, removed link) on 4 October 2007@01:20:48.
David Whitehead (another hw option; modified note) on 19 December 2011@06:41:50.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@09:07:22.

Headword: *)abelterw/tatoi
Adler number: alpha,33
Translated headword: most thoughtless, very thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Aristophanes [writes]: "before this most/very thoughtless men used to sit gaping -- Dolts, Half-wits".[1]
Greek Original:
*)abelterw/tatoi: *)aristofa/nhs: te/ws d' a)belterw/tatoi kexhno/tes *mamma/kuqoi *meliti/dai ka/qhntai.
Notes:
(Entry lacking, Adler reports, in ms S.)
Masculine nominative plural of this superlative, evidently from the quotation given. See also alpha 31, alpha 32.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 989-991 (web address 1), quoted also at beta 468 and mu 121. The other two terms used here (each of them apparently stemming from a proper name) stand at least as much in need of glossing as does this adjective: see Dover (below) 315-16. For the formation of the adjective, see also the entry in LSJ s.v. (web address 2 below).
Reference:
Aristophanes, Frogs, edited with introduction and commentary by K.J. Dover (Oxford 1993)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:03:23.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented note; added bibliography; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:29:41.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 11 January 2001@12:49:46.
William Hutton on 2 February 2001@11:46:00.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 23 March 2008@14:05:57.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@05:10:07.
Catharine Roth on 13 April 2009@13:11:48.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:29:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:25:45.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:24.
David Whitehead (another note) on 28 March 2014@06:25:35.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 April 2015@09:16:57.

Headword: *)abh/s
Adler number: alpha,38
Translated headword: stupid
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone or something] unintelligent.
Greek Original:
*)abh/s: o( a)su/netos.
Notes:
(Entry lacking, Adler reports, in ms S.)
The headword is found only in lexicographers, who seem unsure of its meaning(s): besides the above, cf. a)nai/sxuntos 'shameless' (Hesychius) and a)no/sios 'unholy' (Hesychius and the Etymologicum Gudianum).
Keywords: definition; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@18:51:47.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Altered translation, added keyword, set status) on 26 January 2001@23:17:19.
David Whitehead (added note) on 13 April 2004@09:52:21.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 10 October 2007@00:29:57.
David Whitehead (tweaked note) on 19 December 2011@07:02:35.
David Whitehead (another note and keyword; cosmetic) on 28 March 2014@06:27:47.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@09:19:12.

Headword: *)abiadhno/s
Adler number: alpha,40
Translated headword: Abiadenian
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
From the city Abiadene.
Greek Original:
*)abiadhno/s: a)po\ po/lews *)abiadhnh=s.
Notes:
No such city is attested, so surely the name in question here is Adiabene (see alpha 470, and generally OCD(4) p.12), even though that is consistently classified as a "territory" (in present-day Iraq) rather than a "city".
This entry occurs only here and in the derivative ps.-Zonaras.
Keywords: definition; geography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@18:53:03.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, cosmetics, set status) on 26 January 2001@23:20:36.
David Whitehead (added note) on 9 February 2001@06:01:49.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 9 October 2007@13:07:20.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@07:05:59.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:10:51.

Headword: *)abiou/d
Adler number: alpha,48
Translated headword: Abioud, Abihud
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
*)abiou/d: o)/noma ku/rion.
Notes:
Exodus 6:23 (etc.): a son of Aaron.
cf. the genealogy of Christ at Matthew 1:13 (son of Zorobabel, father of Eliakim).
Keywords: biography; Christianity; definition; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:00:24.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, set status) on 28 January 2001@20:47:42.
William Hutton (Added note and keyword) on 29 January 2001@19:34:27.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 27 February 2003@08:44:09.
Catharine Roth (cosmetic, keyword) on 17 November 2009@18:43:35.
David Whitehead (expanded notes) on 19 December 2011@07:26:26.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 8 August 2013@00:39:08.

Headword: *)ablepth/mati
Adler number: alpha,55
Translated headword: by an oversight
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] by a mistake.
"He bore the oversights of ordinary folk patiently, but those of more intellectual people grieved him."[1]
Also [sc. attested is the participle] a)bleptou=ntes. "Those committing oversights and ashamed to face Philip were coming to help."[2]
Greek Original:
*)ablepth/mati: a(marth/mati. o( de\ fe/rwn e)karte/rei ta\ tw=n i)diwtw=n a)blepth/mata, ta\ de\ tw=n logikwte/rwn au)to\n h)ni/a. kai\ *)ableptou=ntes. oi( de\ a)bleptou=ntes kai\ ai)dou/menoi a)ntofqalmei=n pro\s to\n *fi/lippon e)boh/qoun.
Notes:
The headword and the synonym offered for it are neuter nouns in the dative singular (translated here as instrumental datives). The same headword -- evidently quoted from somewhere but not independently attested -- and gloss also appear in other lexica; references at Photius alpha40 Theodoridis. The first quotation illustrates this same noun but in the accusative plural.
[1] Polybius fr. 90 Büttner-Wobst. Büttner-Wobst notes that this fragment was attributed to Polybius by Casaubon, but not accepted by Schweighäuser (p. 527).
[2] Polybius fr. 91 Büttner-Wobst. Casaubon also attributed this fragment to Polybius, but Büttner-Wobst notes that Dindorf rejected it (ibid.).
Reference:
T. Büttner-Wobst, ed., Polybii Historiae, vol. IV, (Leipzig 1904)
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:07:04.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added note and keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@08:24:21.
David Whitehead (modified translation and note; cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@10:08:32.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@08:01:56.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:47:36.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note) on 2 April 2015@09:26:19.
Ronald Allen (supplemented notes, added bibliography) on 24 April 2018@22:29:37.
Ronald Allen (reworded n.2) on 25 April 2018@22:02:29.
Ronald Allen (cosmeticule) on 9 May 2018@22:31:12.
Ronald Allen (bibliography cosmeticule) on 4 June 2018@22:39:57.
Ronald Allen (cosmeticule in primary note: make em dash symmetrical) on 4 September 2018@18:59:19.

Headword: *)/ablhros
Adler number: alpha,56
Translated headword: Ableros, Ablerus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
*)/ablhros: o)/noma ku/rion.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (4).
Ableros is a Trojan killed by Antilochos in Homer, Iliad 6.32 (accusative case there: web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:07:39.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, set status) on 30 January 2001@08:25:30.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 23 April 2002@09:03:03.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 24 March 2008@17:12:20.
David Whitehead (another note and keyword) on 19 December 2011@08:06:00.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 17 June 2023@19:56:50.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 16 March 2024@01:24:59.

Headword: *)ablh=ta
Adler number: alpha,57
Translated headword: unshot, unthrown
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Referring to] projectiles, ones that have not been dispatched with a view to wounding.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the phrase] 'unshot arrow': the one badly shot or the one not yet shot. Declines a)blh\s, [genitive] a)blh=tos.[2]
Greek Original:
*)ablh=ta: be/lh, ta\ mh\ pemfqe/nta ei)s trw=sin. kai\ a)blh=ta o)i+sto\n, to\n kako/blhton h)\ to\n mh/pw beblhme/non. kli/netai de\ a)blh\s, a)blh=tos.
Notes:
[1] Here the headword adjective is glossed as if it were a neuter plural, but see next note.
[2] cf. the scholia to Homer, Iliad 4.117-118, where this accusative singular phrase occurs, albeit with other words intervening (web address 1 below).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; medicine; military affairs
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:08:39.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation, keyword, raised status) on 30 January 2001@08:35:45.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:07:46.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, added link) on 24 March 2008@17:14:36.
David Whitehead (augmented and modified notes; cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@05:00:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:10:13.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks) on 2 April 2015@10:27:20.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 26 May 2019@00:45:21.

Headword: *)ablhxrh/n
Adler number: alpha,58
Translated headword: feeble
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] weak. For what is strong [is] blhxro/n.[1]
Aelian [writes]: "so she brought her life to an end gently and with a calm and feeble death, such as even Homer seems to me to praise."[2]
Greek Original:
*)ablhxrh/n: a)sqenh=. blhxro\n ga\r to\ i)sxuro/n. *ai)liano/s: kate/streyen ou)=n to\n bi/on pra/ws te kai\ su\n galh/nh| kai\ a)blhxrw=| qana/tw|, o(/nper ou)=n e)painei=n kai\ *(/omhros dokei= moi.
Notes:
The headword adjective is feminine accusative singular. It is extracted from Homer, Iliad 5.337, where it refers to Aphrodite's hand; cf. the scholia there.
[1] Same or similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha42 Theodoridis); and cf. beta 340. This seems to be an error, however: blhxro/s is well attested as meaning "weak" by itself: see web address 1 for the LSJ entry. The lexica mistake the copulative alpha in the headword for an alpha privative.
[2] Aelian fr. 182d Domingo-Forasté (179 Hercher): cf. Homer, Odyssey 11.135 (web address 2 below). The preceding fragment, quoted at tau 596, shows that the subject is a woman.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: biography; daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; poetry; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:09:47.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, modified translation and notes, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@08:53:17.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 4 September 2001@23:32:57.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 June 2003@08:00:49.
David Whitehead (typo) on 17 July 2003@03:43:18.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding, cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@17:16:29.
David Whitehead (added primary note and more keywords; tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:20:09.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link and reference) on 28 January 2012@18:52:16.
Catharine Roth (tweaks, cross-reference, keyword) on 14 October 2012@01:44:40.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:49:04.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:03:02.

Headword: *)abou/lhton kako/n
Adler number: alpha,62
Translated headword: involuntary evil, undesired evil
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] unwanted, what one does not want.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] abouletos, he who does not wish; but Aboulitos [is] a proper name, with the 'i'.[2]
Greek Original:
*)abou/lhton kako/n: a)qe/lhton, o(\ ou) qe/lei tis. kai\ *)abou/lhtos, o( mh\ boulo/menos, *)abou/litos de\ o)/noma ku/rion, dia\ tou= i.
Notes:
[1] The headword phrase has the same or similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha46 Theodoridis), and is presumably quoted from somewhere.
[2] For Aboulitos (or -tes), satrap of Susiana under Alexander the Great, see Plutarch, Alexander 68; Arrian, Anabasis 3.8.5, etc.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; geography; historiography; history
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:22:25.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added keyword, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:38:53.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:30:21.
David Whitehead (augmented headword, notes, keywords) on 15 August 2007@09:45:45.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 1 August 2011@07:41:29.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:52:58.

Headword: *)abouli/a
Adler number: alpha,63
Translated headword: ill-advisedness
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] unrefinedness, foolishness.[1]
Also stupidity.[2]
Greek Original:
*)abouli/a: a)paideusi/a, a)/noia. kai\ mwri/a.
Notes:
[1] Same glossing in the Synagoge and Photius (Lexicon alpha47 Theodoridis); they add prope/teia "rashness".
[2] Same glossing in Hesychius alpha171, where Latte claims the headword as quoted from Euripides, Medea 882 (accusative case there).
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:23:23.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and keyword, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:42:17.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 27 February 2003@08:47:42.
David Whitehead (note; another keyword) on 15 August 2007@09:47:02.
David Whitehead (expanded notes) on 19 December 2011@08:50:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 16 August 2013@06:59:03.
David Whitehead on 5 December 2013@04:21:48.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:33:30.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 13 January 2015@23:24:47.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note 1) on 20 March 2024@00:52:50.

Headword: *(abra\ bai/nwn
Adler number: alpha,70
Translated headword: walking delicately
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] being conceited, being indolent.[1]
"Walking truly delicately, that fellow seemed to be holding his eyebrows up in the air."[2]
Greek Original:
*(abra\ bai/nwn: qrupto/menos, blakeuo/menos. e)kei=nos o)/ntws a(bra\ bai/nwn e)do/kei e)/xwn ta\s o)fru=s u(perhrme/nas a)/nw.
Notes:
See generally LSJ s.v. a(bro/s (web address 1), and cf. alpha 73.
[1] The headword phrase has the same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha49 Theodoridis. It could be extracted from the quotation given, but is more likely to be quoted from Euripides, Trojan Women 820. (So Latte on Hesychius s.v. and more tentatively Theodoridis on Photius s.v.)
[2] Quotation (transmitted, in Adler's view, via the Excerpta Constantini Porphyrogeniti) unidentifiable.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:27:05.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set status) on 30 January 2001@23:11:22.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added note; cosmetics) on 31 January 2001@04:28:51.
Jennifer Benedict (added links) on 25 March 2008@11:53:43.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@03:49:27.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@09:07:56.
David Whitehead (modified notes) on 1 February 2012@05:31:39.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 12 August 2013@22:35:19.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:07:06.
Catharine Roth (typo, coding) on 14 February 2015@10:46:33.
David Whitehead (expanded a note) on 2 April 2015@10:36:52.
Catharine Roth (cross-reference) on 27 March 2024@01:18:35.

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