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Headword:
Adler number: alpha,1
Translated headword: ah! ah!
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
In Aristophanes an adverb accompanying surprise and command. "Ah! ah! Don't get that torch near me!"[1]
'Ah! ah!' must be read separately, not elided; and they both have smooth breathing.[2]. For if they were read together as one word, there would be no need of two accent marks.[3] "Ah" marks surprise, but "ha ha" is for awe, as Agathias says in the Epigrams: "ha, a very daring wax it was that formed..."[4]
Aab.[5]
Greek Original:
#
Notes:
[1] Aristophanes, Plutus [Wealth] 1052 (web address 1). The first sentence is derived from scholia to this passage, and this may also be true of the rest of the entry.
[2] That is, it is "ah! ah!", not "ha! ha!" A difference registered in Greek by the orientation of a small breathing mark that is easily reversed in transcription, especially since by the time the Suda was compiled the initial 'h' had ceased to be pronounced.
[3] i.e. ἂ ἄ is two words, ἀά would be one.
[4] Greek Anthology 1.34.2; again (with slight variations) at mu 389 and sigma 664.
[5] This gloss-less addendum is actually a separate entry that occurs only in ms S. (In Adler's numbering system this is designated alpha 1b, while the main entry is alpha 1a.) Apparently this is a reference to the Hebrew month of Av, attested with this Greek spelling only in Joannes Lydus, De mensibus 3.22.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: chronology; comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 9 November 1999@09:47:43.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised vetting status) on 26 September 2000@14:01:40.
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@04:21:58.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 April 2007@04:35:29.
William Hutton (modified translation, rearranged layout, added note and link, set status) on 19 August 2007@10:41:27.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 22 March 2008@17:08:15.
Catharine Roth (coding, typo) on 22 March 2008@19:48:38.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:43:10.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 5 August 2013@01:21:19.

Headword: Ἀαγές
Adler number: alpha,2
Translated headword: unbroken, unbreakable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] unshattered,[1] strong.
Greek Original:
Ἀαγές: ἄθραυστον, ἰσχυρόν.
Notes:
= Apollonius Sophistes, Lexicon Homericum 2.4. Likewise in Hesychius alpha7; Photius, Lexicon alpha4 Theodoridis; Etymologicum Gudianum 1.12. This form of the adjective is the neuter nominative singular, as at Homer, Odyssey 11.575 (web address 1).
All but the last word of this entry is absent from ms M (= Marcianus 448), as are the last several words of alpha 1 (a and b).
[1] cf. alpha 750.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:55:22.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised status) on 26 September 2000@13:50:00.
Ross Scaife ✝ (testing) on 22 June 2001@13:33:15.
Catharine Roth (added link and keywords) on 6 March 2002@00:09:12.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@09:58:28.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added keyword, set status) on 19 August 2007@10:53:47.
David Whitehead (restored lost keywords) on 19 August 2007@11:26:45.
William Hutton (augmented headword) on 20 August 2007@08:18:48.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:09:21.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:45:02.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 16 December 2011@11:36:59.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@05:57:53.

Headword: Ἀαδεῖν
Adler number: alpha,3
Translated headword: to disturb
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to harass, to be at a loss, to be treated unjustly,[1] to go hungry.
Greek Original:
Ἀαδεῖν: ὀχλεῖν, ἀπορεῖν, ἀδικεῖσθαι, ἀσιτεῖν.
Notes:
Same entry in other lexica: Apollonius' Homeric Lexicon (2.14), Hesychius alpha10, Photius alpha5 Theodoridis, and cf. Etymologicum Gudianum 1.15. The headword is otherwise unattested -- and the range of active and passive meanings suggests that the lexicographers may have been guessing at a meaning, perhaps on the basis of the (not improbable, but see Chantraine s.v. ἀαδα ) etymology of α -privative + ἁδ- ('please', 'delight').
[1] This third gloss is absent from ms M (= Marcianus 448).
Reference:
P. Chantraine, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque, ed. 2 Paris 2009.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@08:53:07.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised vetting status) on 26 September 2000@14:27:33.
David Whitehead (changed keyword; added note) on 27 February 2003@07:06:07.
William Hutton (augmented notes, added keywords, set status) on 19 August 2007@12:29:45.
William Hutton (typo) on 19 August 2007@17:07:52.
William Hutton (modified note) on 20 August 2007@08:24:19.
William Hutton (added note) on 20 August 2007@08:25:47.
William Hutton on 20 August 2007@08:38:45.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode) on 22 March 2008@17:11:48.
Jennifer Benedict (tweak to note) on 24 March 2008@23:12:53.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:46:40.
Catharine Roth (added bibliography) on 1 January 2012@23:17:55.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:02:40.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 18 December 2014@22:28:37.

Headword: Ἀάλιον
Adler number: alpha,4
Translated headword: undisciplined
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] disorderly, powerless.[1]
But ἅλιον [means] in vain.[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀάλιον: ἄτακτον, ἀκρατές. Ἅλιον δὲ τὸ μάταιον.
Notes:
[1] Up to this point the entry = Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.14, and Photius, Lexicon alpha6 Theodoridis; cf. also Hesychius alpha17. The headword is unattested outside lexica and grammars (and attested there only in this neuter singular nominative/accusative form, presumably quoted from somewhere). Schwyzer in DGE suggests an etymology from alpha-privative + the root of ἅλις ('sufficient').
[2] This addendum, for which cf. alpha 1237, is lacking in ms S (= Vaticanus 1296).
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:46:59.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Minor alterations, set status.) on 14 October 2000@00:43:32.
David Whitehead (added note) on 9 February 2001@04:26:22.
David Whitehead (betacoding and other cosmetics) on 2 October 2005@10:42:58.
David Whitehead (augmented notes) on 15 August 2007@09:37:04.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, set status) on 19 August 2007@17:59:45.
William Hutton (augmented note) on 20 August 2007@08:43:59.
Jennifer Benedict (tweak to note) on 24 March 2008@23:13:44.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:57:27.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:03:49.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 March 2015@22:40:29.

Headword: Ἄαπτος
Adler number: alpha,5
Translated headword: irresistable, invulnerable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unharmed.
Herodianus[1] says about ἄαπτος that it comes from ἰάπτω ['I harm'], and after adding alpha-privative and dropping the 'i' [it becomes] ἄαπτος , "whom no one can harm." Or perhaps the 'a' is not to be taken as negative but as intensifying, so it would be "one who has great power to harm." Thus the first has a passive sense, the second an active. With the negative prefix it also means "one who is untouched."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἄαπτος: ἀβλαβής. Ἡρωδιανός φησι περὶ τοῦ ἄαπτος, ὅτι γίγνεται ἀπὸ τοῦ ἰάπτω τὸ βλάπτω, καὶ μετὰ τοῦ στερητικοῦ α καὶ κατ' ἔλλειψιν τοῦ ι ἄαπτος, ὃν οὐδεὶς δύναται βλάψαι. ἢ οὐχὶ κατὰ στέρησιν ἐκληπτέον τὸ α, ἀλλὰ κατ' ἐπίτασιν, ἵν' ᾖ ὁ μεγάλα δυνάμενος βλάπτειν. ὥστε τὸ μὲν πρῶτον δηλοῖ πάθος, τὸ δὲ δεύτερον ἐνέργειαν. λέγεται δὲ καὶ ἄαπτος κατὰ στέρησιν ὁ ἄψαυστος.
Notes:
This form of the headword, the nominative singular masculine/feminine, is unattested outside lexicography; however, plural forms occur frequently in hexameter poetry, in the formula χεῖρες ἄαπτοι or χεῖρας ἀάπτους (usually interpreted as 'irresistable hands'); e.g. Homer, Iliad 8.450 (web address 1).
[1] The etymological comments that follow occur only in mss G (= Parisinus 2623) and T (= Vaticanus 881); cf. Herodianus 3.2.30.
[2] This etymology, alpha-privative + ἅπτομαι ('touch'), is the one most commonly accepted nowadays. See LSJ s.v. (web address 2) and Schwyzer, DGE. Yet there is reason for doubt, and the correct Homeric form (attested already by Aristophanes of Byzantium) may actually be ἀεπτ- . See Chantraine s.v. ἄαπτος .
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:48:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status; cosmetics) on 16 October 2000@15:10:37.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@07:40:44.
David Whitehead (betacoding and other cosmetics) on 9 November 2005@09:16:30.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, cosmetics, added keywords and links, set status) on 19 August 2007@18:31:56.
William Hutton (typo) on 20 August 2007@04:20:04.
William Hutton (augmented notes, tweaked headwords) on 20 August 2007@08:59:16.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics, consistency) on 25 March 2008@00:11:12.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 16 December 2011@23:59:48.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:14:21.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; note typo) on 2 April 2015@08:36:40.

Headword: Ἀασάμην
Adler number: alpha,7
Translated headword: I was addled
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] I did wrong, I slipped up;[1] I was damaged,[2] in the sense of "I was overcome by folly."
Greek Original:
Ἀασάμην: ἥμαρτον, ἐσφάλην: ἐβλάβην, οἷον ἄτῃ περιέπεσον.
Notes:
The headword is the first person singular, aorist indicative middle/passive, of ἀάω (LSJ entry at web address 1). It is found frequently in epic poetry, e.g. Homer Iliad 9.116 (web address 2).
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge (Codex B) alpha3 (Lexica Segueriana 3.8 Bachmann).
[2] From here on the entry is very similar to Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 1.19, and Hesychius alpha25.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; poetry; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:50:10.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status, minor alterations to translation) on 17 October 2000@17:21:27.
William Hutton on 17 October 2000@17:22:15.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@04:43:19.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added links and keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@04:52:46.
William Hutton (updated footnote) on 8 November 2007@06:02:11.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode typo) on 22 March 2008@17:15:55.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:13:03.
William Hutton on 22 July 2009@15:25:18.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:09:02.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:06:47.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@10:30:04.

Headword: Ἀάσαι
Adler number: alpha,8
Translated headword: to harm, to infatuate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
has four meanings: to satisfy,[1] to go to sleep,[2] to harm, to cause pain.
Greek Original:
Ἀάσαι τέσσαρα σημαίνει: κορέσαι, καθυπνῶσαι, βλάψαι, λυπῆσαι.
Notes:
The headword is aorist active infinitive, glossed with four others. The entry = Photius, Lexicon alpha9 Theodoridis, and similar material can be found in Synagoge (Codex B) alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.5-7). Compare also Etymologicum Gudianum 1.8. This particular form is unattested outside lexicography, though it appears as an entry in Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.5, and is presumably related to such Homeric forms as we find at alpha 7.
[1] This meaning is unattested for the verb ἀάω (LSJ entry at web address 1).
[2] In that one loses consciousness and control in sleep, as in Homer Odyssey 10.68 (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:55:13.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Translated headword, changed status) on 17 October 2000@17:24:27.
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 2 August 2004@09:47:05.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, added links and keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@05:15:27.
William Hutton (typo) on 20 August 2007@09:12:24.
William Hutton on 8 November 2007@06:10:34.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:13:46.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:08:03.

Headword: Ἀάσχετος
Adler number: alpha,9
Translated headword: irresistible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Something someone/something] uncontrollable.[1]
Greek Original:
Ἀάσχετος: ἀκράτητος.
Notes:
A word from epic poetry, e.g. Homer, Iliad 5.892 (web address 1), with metrical reduplication of the initial alpha (cf. LSJ s.v. ἄσχετος at web address 2). The headword and the gloss are both masculine/feminine nominative singular.
[1] A related but not identical word (ἀκατακράτητον ) is used to gloss the neuter form of the headword at Etymologicum Magnum 1.32.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; meter and music; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:55:57.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status) on 17 October 2000@17:25:25.
David Whitehead (modified headword, to differentiate it from gloss) on 9 February 2001@04:47:19.
William Hutton (modified headword, added notes, links and keywords) on 20 August 2007@08:09:43.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 22 March 2008@17:17:54.
David Whitehead (spelling) on 23 March 2008@05:06:11.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:14:55.
Jennifer Benedict (another cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:15:34.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:14:10.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@08:39:22.

Headword: Ἀββᾶ
Adler number: alpha,10
Translated headword: Abba, Father
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The ancients called God "Father" from a feeling of relationship. Moses said, "You have forsaken God who begot you."[1] And Malachi: "One God begot us and is our father."[2] They were in a state of grace, moved by the force of the Spirit. Just as there is the Spirit of wisdom by which fools have become wise (for this is clear from the teachings), and the Spirit of power by which they raised both the weak and the dead, and the Spirit of prophecy, and the Spirit of tongues, so also there is the Spirit of adoption.[3] And just as we know the Spirit of prophecy, through which one who has it is moved by grace to tell the future, so also the Spirit of adoption, through which one moved by the Spirit calls God "Father." One who wishes to show that this is most legitimate even used a Hebrew word. For he did not say "Father" but "Abba the Father." This is the word used especially by legitimate children for their father.[4]
Greek Original:
Ἀββᾶ: ὁ πατήρ. οἱ μὲν παλαιοὶ ἐκάλουν πατέρα τὸν θεὸν ἐξ οἰκείας διανοίας, ὡς Μωϋσῆς: θεὸν τὸν γεννήσαντά σε ἐγκατέλιπες: καὶ Μαλαχίας: ὁ θεὸς εἷς ἐγέννησεν ἡμᾶς καὶ πατήρ: οἱ δὲ ἐν χάριτι, ἀπὸ πνευματικῆς ἐνεργείας κινούμενοι. ὥσπερ πνεῦμα σοφίας εἶναι, καθ' ὃ σοφοὶ οἱ ἄσοφοι ἐγένοντο [καὶ δηλοῦται τοῦτο ἀπὸ τῆς διδασκαλίας] καὶ πνεῦμα δυνάμεως εἶναι, καθ' ὃ καὶ ἀσθενεῖς καὶ νεκροὺς ἤγειρον, καὶ πνεῦμα προφητείας, καὶ πνεῦμα γλωσσῶν, οὕτω καὶ πνεῦμα υἱοθεσίας. καὶ ὥσπερ ἴσμεν τὸ πνεῦμα τῆς προφητείας, ἀφ' ὧν ὁ ἔχων αὐτὸ λέγει τὰ μέλλοντα ὑπὸ τῆς χάριτος κινούμενος, οὕτω δὴ καὶ πνεῦμα υἱοθεσίας, ἀφ' οὗ ὁ λαβὼν πατέρα καλεῖ τὸν θεὸν, ὑπὸ πνεύματος κινούμενος. ὁ δὴ βουλόμενος δεῖξαι γνησιώτατον ὂν καὶ τῇ τῶν Ἑβραίων ἐχρήσατο γλώττῃ. οὐ γὰρ εἶπεν ὁ πατὴρ, ἀλλ' ἀββᾶ ὁ πατήρ: ὅπερ τῶν παίδων μάλιστά ἐστι τῶν γνησίων πρὸς πατέρα ῥῆμα.
Notes:
A paraphrase of St. John Chrysostom, Homily on the Epistle to the Romans PG 60.527.
(Entry placed after alpha 16, Adler reports, in mss GTMB.)
[1] Deuteronomy 32:18 LXX (web address 1).
[2] Malachi 2:10 LXX (web address 2).
[3] cf. Ep.Romans 8:15 (web address 3).
[4] On "Abba," see also alpha 12.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: children; Christianity; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; medicine; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:57:30.
Vetted by:
Samuel Huskey (added links to Bible, changed "sonship" to "filiation") on 15 July 2000@15:01:55.
Catharine Roth (Altered wording.) on 29 July 2000@23:15:23.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 11 July 2003@08:51:36.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 6 October 2005@08:51:18.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, augmented notes, fixed broken links, added keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@10:15:40.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 5 August 2013@01:15:24.
David Whitehead (another note; cosmetics) on 28 March 2014@06:14:49.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation, added cross-reference) on 28 March 2014@12:15:01.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:24:11.

Headword: Ἀβάκησαν
Adler number: alpha,11
Translated headword: they kept quiet
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] they were unaware, they did not understand.
Greek Original:
Ἀβάκησαν: ἠγνόησαν, ἠσυνέτησαν.
Note:
The headword is the third person plural, aorist indicative active, of ἀβακέω . This form is found only in Homer, Odyssey 4.249 (web address 1), and the many lexicographical notices generated by it. Of those the most similar to this entry are Photius, Lexicon alpha22 Theodoridis, and Etymologicum Magnum 2.30-31. Compare also Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.16; Hesychius alpha54. The glosses offered here and elsewhere probably represent semantic extrapolation from the Homeric context: When Odysseus comes in disguise to Troy, Helen knows who he is but the rest of the people in Troy ἀβάκησαν . The translation of the headword, on the other hand, reflects the verb's probable etymological connection with the verb βάζω 'speak', and the adjective ἀβακής ('speechless', 'tranquil'). Cf. Chantraine s.v. ἀβακής , a connection that is sometimes mentioned as a possibility in the ancient scholarship.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:58:43.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Altered wording, added note and link.) on 29 July 2000@23:31:10.
David Whitehead (expanded note; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@10:04:22.
Catharine Roth (modified link, added betacode, raised status) on 26 November 2006@23:52:21.
William Hutton (modified headword, augmented note) on 21 August 2007@09:45:37.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:27:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:20:49.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:10:41.

Headword: Ἀββακούμ
Adler number: alpha,12
Translated headword: Habakkuk, Avvakoum
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[A name meaning] father of awakening. For the [word] abba means father,[1] and koum means awakening.[2] So also in the Holy Gospel: "Talitha, koum," that is, "young girl, get up."[3] From which [it is] clear that Abbakoum must be written with double b.[4]
Greek Original:
Ἀββακούμ: πατὴρ ἐγέρσεως. τὸ μὲν γὰρ ἀββᾶ σημαίνει πατήρ, τὸ δὲ κοὺμ ἔγερσις: ὡς καὶ παρὰ τῷ θείῳ εὐαγγελίῳ: ταληθὰ, κούμ, ἤγουν ἡ παῖς ἐγείρου. ὅθεν δῆλον, ὅτι διὰ τῶν δύο ββ γραπτέον τὸ Ἀββακούμ.
Notes:
An etymology for the name of the prophet Habakkuk (in the Septuagint, Ambakoum or Avvakoum), based on two Aramaic words found in the New Testament. The Suda is drawing from older onomastica; the same etymology is found in the Origenistic lexicon (see bibliography).
[1] See already alpha 10. The Hebrew/Aramaic אבּא abba means father.
[2] The Hebrew/Aramaic קום kūm means arise; it can also be used to mean awake.
[3] Mark 5:41 (web address 1); not in the other Gospels, but several times in patristic literature.
[4] The Suda is correct. The doubling of the בּ is indicated by its dot (dagesh); unlike Greek, Hebrew and Aramaic do not replicate doubled letters.
Reference:
Paul de Lagarde, Onomastica Sacra, p. 200, line 14-15
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: children; Christianity; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; imagery; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:59:43.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Altered wording.) on 29 July 2000@23:23:46.
Catharine Roth (Augmented note with information supplied by Lee Fields.) on 1 May 2001@19:02:40.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@10:07:42.
Raphael Finkel (Added notes 2, 4, Hebrew.) on 12 August 2004@14:47:21.
Catharine Roth (added a keyword) on 8 October 2005@00:31:59.
William Hutton (cosmetics, added keywords and link, set status) on 21 August 2007@09:59:47.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:27:14.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:23:06.
David Whitehead (another keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:27:45.
Catharine Roth (typo) on 18 December 2011@10:53:04.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@01:12:51.
Raphael Finkel (Converted Romanization of Hebrew to ISO 259.) on 7 August 2014@13:38:11.
David Whitehead (expanded a note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@08:48:00.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@06:56:57.

Headword: Ἀβάλε
Adler number: alpha,13
Translated headword: would that
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] o that.[1] "Would that [...]."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβάλε: εἴθε ἀβάλε.
Notes:
For the headword see LSJ s.v. ἄβαλε (web address 1). The entry = Photius, Lexicon alpha26 Theodoridis, and, with the exception of the repetition of the headword within the entry (see note 2), also Synagoge alpha1 (Lexica Segueriana 3.10), Hesychius (s.v. ἄ βάλε , alpha60) and Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.15. The word does not occur in the extant text of Homer, but there are other literary attestations including Callimachus fr. 619 Pfeiffer, and Greek Anthology 7.583.1 (Agathias Scholasticus).
cf. generally alpha 14.
[1] For more on εἴθε see epsiloniota 55.
[2] Apparently the beginning of a quotation, perhaps from one of the works mentioned above; otherwise the repetition of the headword is hard to explain. See Theodoridis' note.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:45:11.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:23:01.
David Whitehead (modified translation; supplied note) on 2 August 2004@10:13:43.
William Hutton (rearranged translation and notes, added link and keywords, set status) on 22 August 2007@11:14:02.
William Hutton on 22 August 2007@11:17:12.
William Hutton (augmented notes) on 23 August 2007@10:04:46.
William Hutton (corrected and updated references in footnote) on 8 November 2007@06:13:12.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:29:07.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:32:04.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 18 December 2011@10:54:34.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:14:01.
Ronald Allen (typo in n.2) on 13 August 2018@21:59:26.

Headword: Ἄβαλεν
Adler number: alpha,14
Translated headword: threw
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[ἄβαλεν is found] meaning ἔβαλεν .
Greek Original:
Ἄβαλεν: ἀντὶ τοῦ ἔβαλεν.
Note:
Likewise in other lexica; see the references at Photius alpha27 Theodoridis. The headword variant -- for the aorist indicative active of βάλλω , third person singular -- is otherwise unattested.
Keyword: dialects, grammar, and etymology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:46:22.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified note, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:28:41.
Robert Dyer (Added a reference to the form of the Headword with a different accent, and another Keyword. Raised status.) on 9 February 2002@15:59:31.
David Whitehead (x-ref; cosmetics) on 2 August 2004@10:16:30.
Catharine Roth (tweaks) on 20 December 2010@22:16:54.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 18 December 2011@10:33:55.
Catharine Roth (punctuation) on 18 December 2011@10:56:45.
David Whitehead (streamlined note) on 16 August 2013@06:21:47.

Headword: Ἀβάντειος
Adler number: alpha,15
Translated headword: Abanteios, Abantius, Abantian
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The [house][1] of Abas.[2] Also [attested is] Abantiades.[3]
Greek Original:
Ἀβάντειος: ὁ τοῦ Ἄβαντος. καὶ Ἀβαντιάδης.
Notes:
Adler cites as a comparandum Lexicon Ambrosianum 22, 23, 28.
[1] This suppletion is suggested by the corresponding entry in the Lexicon of pseudo-Zonaras 5.1, which is identical to this entry apart from the headword phrase: vs. Ἀβάντειος here, ps.-Zonaras has Ἀβάντειος δόμος ('Abantian house'). The headword here could serve as a modifier for any substantive of the masculine gender, including a son or descendant, as is suggested by the subsequent reference to a patronymic form. The adjective is unattested outside of grammars and lexica, and ps.-Zonaras provides the only example of it modifying a specific substantive. Stephanus of Byzantium in his entry on 'Abantis', an early name for Euboea (cf. Hesiod fr. 296 Merkelbach-West), notes it as the possessive adjective relating to the Abantes or to their legendary founder Abas, whom Stephanos identifies either as the son of Lynkeus (see note 2 below) or a homonymous son of Poseidon. Cf. also Herodianus Peri orthographias 3.2.429.34 and 465.14.
[2] Not the Abas of alpha 20, but one of the mythological figures of that name; in fact almost certainly A. the son of Lynkeus, king of Argos [Myth, Place] after Danaos and father of the twins Akrisios and Proitos (Pausanias 2.16.2 (web address 1); Apollodorus, Library 2.2.1 (web address 2)).
[3] This term is used by (e.g.) Ovid both for an actual son of Abas (Metamorphoses 4.607 (Acrisius): web address 3) and in the sense of a more distant descendant (4.673 (Perseus, great-grandson of Abas; cf. pi 1372): web address 4).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3,
Web address 4
Keywords: biography; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; mythology; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:47:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Entered headword, modified note, added keywords, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:34:40.
David Whitehead (augmented and modified note; added keyword) on 27 February 2003@07:23:08.
David Whitehead (tweaked tr; augmented notes and keywords; raised status) on 23 August 2007@07:12:31.
William Hutton (augmented notes, tweaked translation) on 23 August 2007@13:11:02.
William Hutton (tweaks and typos) on 24 August 2007@02:44:20.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@23:38:57.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 5 August 2013@01:08:34.

Headword: Ἄβαξι
Adler number: alpha,16
Translated headword: planks, abacuses
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
What we call ἀβάκια .[1] The Lawmaker [says] in the Martyrdom of Saint Thecla: "Tryphaina was overcome by suffering, and was seen lying like the dead on the slabs."[2] So he says.
Greek Original:
Ἄβαξι: τοῖς παρ' ἡμῖν λεγομένοις ἀβακίοις. ὁ Λογοθέτης ἐν τῷ τῆς ἁγίας Θέκλης μαρτυρίῳ: Τρύφαινα δὲ πάθει ληφθεῖσα νεκροῖς ὁμοία πρὸς τοῖς ἄβαξιν ὡρᾶτο κειμένη. οὕτω φησίν.
Notes:
This entry occurs after alpha 17 in ms A (= Parisinus 2625), after alpha 9 in ms S (= Vaticanus 1296) and in the margin of ms D (Bodleianus Auct. V 52).
[1] The given form is a dative plural of ἄβαξ , ("abacus"), and the lexicographer explains it by reference to the diminutive ἀβάκιον . The primary sense is a table topped by a slab, or the slab itself; a "calculator" is a secondary meaning.
[2] Symeon Metaphrastes (also known as the Logothete ('Lawmaker')) Patrologia Graeca 115.837c. On Thecla, cf. tau 1108.
Keywords: biography; Christianity; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; history; mathematics; religion; science and technology; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:53:59.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation and notes, added keywords, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:46:37.
Catharine Roth (modified translation, augmented note) on 7 November 2002@15:06:33.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 7 November 2002@15:08:44.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 November 2005@09:20:27.
Catharine Roth (added keyword) on 6 September 2006@23:44:05.
William Hutton (modified headword and translation, augmented notes, set status) on 24 August 2007@09:36:45.
William Hutton on 24 August 2007@09:42:51.
Jennifer Benedict (tweaks) on 24 March 2008@23:50:31.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:35:22.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 7 February 2015@23:44:46.

Headword: Ἄβαπτος
Adler number: alpha,17
Translated headword: untempered
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] most/very unsharpened.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the superlative] ἀβαπτότατος .[2]
Greek Original:
Ἄβαπτος: ἀστομώτατος. καὶ Ἀβαπτότατος.
Notes:
The headword is unattested outside lexicography.
[1] Similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha28 Theodoridis), except that the original form of the gloss, in Cyril, seems simply to be ἀστόμωτος ('unsharpened'), not this superlative of a different but potentially synonymous adjective ἄστομος . Cyril's reading has been adopted in Latte's text of Hesychius and Theodoridis' of Photius.
[2] Only in ms A (= Parisinus 2625). This superlative form of the headword is attested only here.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; science and technology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:54:56.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified note, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:59:20.
David Whitehead (another note; betacoding and other cosmetics) on 9 November 2005@09:22:26.
William Hutton (augmented notes, set status) on 24 August 2007@04:43:34.
William Hutton (tweaks) on 24 August 2007@04:54:57.
William Hutton (betacode fix) on 30 August 2007@04:50:05.
William Hutton (modified note) on 8 November 2007@06:44:00.
Jennifer Benedict (ms. cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:52:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 18 December 2011@10:37:33.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:28:44.

Headword: Ἄβαρις
Adler number: alpha,18
Translated headword: Abaris, Avars
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Scythian, son of Seuthes. He wrote the so-called Scythinian Oracles[1] and Marriage of the river Hebros and Purifications and a Theogony in prose and Arrival of Apollo among the Hyperboreans in meter. He came from Scythia to Greece.
The legendary arrow belongs to him, the one he flew on from Greece to Hyperborean Scythia. It was given to him by Apollo.[2]
Gregory the Theologian mentioned this man in his Epitaphios for Basil the Great.[3]
They say[4] that once, when there was a plague throughout the entire inhabited world, Apollo told the Greeks and barbarians who had come to consult his oracle that the Athenian people should make prayers on behalf of all of them. So, many peoples sent ambassadors to them, and Abaris, they say, came as ambassador of the Hyperboreans in the third Olympiad.[5]
[Note] that the Bulgarians thoroughly destroyed the Avars[6] by force.
[Note] that these Avars drove out the Sabinorians, when they themselves had been expelled by peoples living near the shore of the Ocean, who left their own land when a mist formed in the flood of the Ocean and a crowd of griffins appeared; the story was that they would not stop until they had devoured the race of men. So the people driven away by these monsters invaded their neighbors. As the invaders were stronger, the others submitted and left, just as the Saragurians, when they were driven out, went to the Akatziri Huns.[7]
The declension is Abaris, Abaridos [genitive singular], Abaridas [accusative plural], and with apocope Abaris [nominative plural].
See about these things under 'Bulgarians'.[8]
Greek Original:
Ἄβαρις: Σκύθης, Σεύθου υἱός. συνεγράψατο δὲ χρησμοὺς τοὺς καλουμένους Σκυθινοὺς καὶ Γάμον Ἕβρου τοῦ ποταμοῦ καὶ Καθαρμοὺς καὶ Θεογονίαν καταλογάδην καὶ Ἀπόλλωνος ἄφιξιν εἰς Ὑπερβορέους ἐμμέτρως. ἧκε δὲ ἐκ Σκυθῶν εἰς Ἑλλάδα. τούτου ὁ μυθολογούμενος ὀϊστὸς, τοῦ πετομένου ἀπὸ τῆς Ἑλλάδος μέχρι τῶν Ὑπερβορέων Σκυθῶν: ἐδόθη δὲ αὐτῷ παρὰ τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος. τούτου καὶ Γρηγόριος ὁ Θεολόγος ἐν τῷ εἰς τὸν μέγαν Βασίλειον Ἐπιταφίῳ μνήμην πεποίηται. φασὶ δὲ ὅτι λοιμοῦ κατὰ πᾶσαν τὴν οἰκουμένην γεγονότος ἀνεῖλεν ὁ Ἀπόλλων μαντευομένοις Ἕλλησι καὶ βαρβάροις τὸν Ἀθηναίων δῆμον ὑπὲρ πάντων εὐχὰς ποιήσασθαι. πρεσβευομένων δὲ πολλῶν ἐθνῶν πρὸς αὐτοὺς, καὶ Ἄβαριν ἐξ Ὑπερβορέων πρεσβευτὴν ἀφικέσθαι λέγουσι κατὰ τὴν γ# Ὀλυμπιάδα. ὅτι τοὺς Ἀβάρις οἱ Βούλγαροι κατὰ κράτος ἄρδην ἠφάνισαν. ὅτι οἱ Ἀβάρις οὗτοι ἐξήλασαν Σαβίνωρας, μετανάσται γενόμενοι ὑπὸ ἐθνῶν οἰκούντων μὲν τὴν παρωκεανῖτιν ἀκτήν, τὴν δὲ χώραν ἀπολιπόντων διὰ τὸ ἐξ ἀναχύσεως τοῦ Ὠκεανοῦ ὁμιχλῶδες γινόμενον, καὶ γρυπῶν δὲ πλῆθος ἀναφανέν: ὅπερ ἦν λόγος μὴ πρότερον παύσασθαι πρὶν ἢ βορὰν ποιῆσαι τὸ τῶν ἀνθρώπων γένος. διὸ δὴ ὑπὸ τῶνδε ἐλαυνόμενοι τῶν δεινῶν τοῖς πλησιοχώροις ἐνέβαλλον: καὶ τῶν ἐπιόντων δυνατωτέρων ὄντων οἱ τὴν ἔφοδον ὑφιστάμενοι μετανίσταντο, ὥσπερ καὶ οἱ Σαράγουροι ἐλαθέντες πρὸς τοῖς Ἀκατίροις Οὔννοις ἐγένοντο. κλίνεται δὲ Ἄβαρις, Ἀβάριδος, τοὺς Ἀβάριδας, καὶ κατὰ ἀποκοπὴν Ἀβάρις. ζήτει περὶ τῶν αὐτῶν ἐν τῷ Βούλγαροι.
Notes:
See generally A.H. Griffiths in OCD(4) p.1: "legendary devotee of Apollo from the far north, a shamanistic missionary and saviour-figure like Aristeas [alpha 3900]". Adler credits this part of the entry to the Epitome Onomatologi Hesychii Milesii.
[1] Or in one manuscript, 'Skythian'.
[2] Perhaps from a scholion on the passage about to be cited (so Adler). Cf. Herodotos 4.36.1 (web address 1).
[3] Gregory of Nazianzus PG 36.524b.
[4] This material is from Harpokration s.v. Ἄβαρις
[5] 768-765 BCE. Harpokration (see preceding note) cites Hippostratos (FGrH 568 F4) to this effect, but adds that there were later alternatives: the twenty-first Olympiad (696-693) or "the time of Croesus, king of Lydia" (so Pindar, fr.270 Snell-Maehler), i.e. c.560-546.
[6] The word used for the Avars here, Ἀβάρις , is a homograph for the name of the Hyperborean wise man Abaris, so this separate section on the Avars is included in this entry. There is no indication that the lexicographer sees any connection between the two topics.
[7] Priscus fr.30 FHG (4.104), still 30 Bornmann. The final part reappears at alpha 820 and sigma 111.
[8] beta 423.
References:
RE Abaris (1) I.16-17
Macartney, C.A. "On the Greek Sources for the History of the Turks in the Sixth Century." BSOAS 11 (1944): 266-275
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; Christianity; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; historiography; history; mythology; philosophy; poetry; religion; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@17:03:41.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation and notes, added keywords, set status.) on 19 January 2001@14:57:43.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and bibliography; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@05:20:43.
David Whitehead (added note) on 14 February 2001@06:09:48.
Mihai Olteanu (The only thracian item concerning Abaris is his father's name. Everything else pledes for his sythian ('hyperborean') origin. This is why I suppose we deal here with a copist mistake, and I propose the emendation: ́Αβαρις: Σκύθης, *Σκύθου υἱός (for Σκύθης as mythological character, see for example Herodotos 4,10).) on 22 January 2002@21:55:20.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 January 2002@03:11:25.
David Whitehead (augmented n.6 and added a keyword) on 5 October 2004@03:21:13.
William Hutton (augmented notes, added link and keywords, set status) on 24 August 2007@11:05:00.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@00:16:43.
David Whitehead (another note; cosmetics) on 28 March 2014@06:23:27.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:06:21.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 31 January 2015@09:22:24.

Headword: Ἀβαρνίς
Adler number: alpha,19
Translated headword: Abarnis
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Name of a city.
Greek Original:
Ἀβαρνίς: ὄνομα πόλεως.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (74), and cf. more generally the scholia to Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1.932 (where the genitive case occurs), on which see further below.
Abarnis lay on the southern shore of the Propontis (Sea of Marmara), between Parion and Lampsakos; Barrington Atlas map 51 grid H4. According to Stephanus of Byzantium s.v. Ἄβαρνος (sic), Abarnos and Aparnis were also attested versions of its name.
A scholium to Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1.932 (repeated in more legible form in Etymologicum Magnum 2.11-28) provides an etymological explanation of the origin of the name in Aphrodite's refusal (ἀπαρνήσασθαι ) to recognize her offspring Priapos, who was born in the region.
Keywords: children; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; geography; mythology; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:55:54.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified note) on 19 September 2000@03:59:17.
William Hutton (augmented note, added keywords, set status) on 24 August 2007@23:38:41.
David Whitehead (augmented and re-arranged note) on 19 December 2011@06:02:32.
Catharine Roth (coding, typo) on 5 August 2013@00:18:42.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 10 January 2015@22:46:51.

Headword: Ἀβασάνιστος
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβασάνιστος: ἀγύμναστος ἢ ἀνεξέταστος, ἀδοκίμαστος. εἴρηται δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς βασάνου τῆς χρυσοχοϊκῆς λίθου, ἐν ᾗ δοκιμάζουσι τὸ χρυσίον. ἐχρήσατο δὲ Αἰλιανὸς ἐν τῷ περὶ προνοίας τῷ ἀβασάνιστος ἀντὶ τοῦ ἄνευ ὀδύνης.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] βάσανος can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.

Headword: Ἄβατον
Adler number: alpha,23
Translated headword: inaccessible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] sacred, unapproachable, desolate;[1] also an 'inaccessible' road, [meaning] impassable.
Greek Original:
Ἄβατον: ἱερὸν, ἀπρόσιτον, ἔρημον: καὶ ὁδὸς ἄβατος, ἡ ἀπόρευτος.
Notes:
The headword is the neuter singular form of this adjective, which, as a substantive, can be used for the adyton of a temple or shrine.
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge alpha5, and Photius, Lexicon alpha31 Theodoridis; cf. Hesychius alpha91 (where Latte confidently asserts that the headword is quoted from Euripides, Bacchae 10).
Keywords: architecture; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:21:29.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keywords and status) on 20 January 2001@11:38:48.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added a keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:31:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keyword, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:18:41.
Catharine Roth (deleted keyword) on 3 October 2007@19:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:05.
William Hutton (Modifed and updated notes.) on 11 November 2007@07:16:09.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@06:14:37.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@03:58:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@00:52:27.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:33:19.
William Hutton (typo) on 21 August 2013@10:06:07.

Headword: Ἀβαχθανῆ
Adler number: alpha,24
Translated headword: abakhthani
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
A Hebrew expression.
Greek Original:
Ἀβαχθανῆ: λέξις Ἑβραϊκή.
Notes:
Strictly speaking the headword is a truncated Aramaic, rather than Hebrew, term. Its proper form in Greek transliteration is σαβαχθάνι and translates "you have forsaken me." The term occurs at Matthew 27:46 and Mark 15:34, where Jesus on the cross quotes Psalm 21:2 LXX (22:2 MT): "God, my God, ... why have you forsaken me?" (see eta 210). For the Hebrew, see Kohlenberger, 3.367. In Aramaic, "why have you forsaken me" is למא שבקתני lama šaḇaqtani. The Suda has carelessly disassociated the sigma, creating in effect "lamas aḇaqtani or ἀβαχθανη --a clear signal that the compiler was unfamiliar with Aramaic. The Psalmic Hebrew original is עזבתני 'azaḇtani, from עזב ʿazaḇ "forsake, forget". For the triliteral root citation, see Brown, Driver, and Briggs, 736ff. For šaḇaqtani (from שבק šeḇaq), see Perschbacher, 364; Danker, 909.
The Suda item has a circumflex accent on the final syllable. In the Hebrew עזבתני ʿazaḇtani, the accent falls on the penultimate syllable (-ta-), consistent with perfects suffixed with a first person singular pronoun; for this, see Kelley, 154.A; Gesenius, 155(58.1). So in the Aramaic, the accent falls on the penultimate syllable (-ta-). That said, the accent in Greek transliteration is inconsistent. Perschbacher places it over the final iota (σαβαχθανί ) in the headword; however, his citation from The Greek New Testament According to the Majority Text (1982) places the accent over the penultimate (σαβαχθάνι ). In addition, Perschbacher offers the transliteration σαβαχθανεί from The New Testament in the Original Greek (1881). Danker places the accent over the penultimate syllable.
Phonologically, the Aramaic shin (ש š /ʃ/) cannot be accommodated by Greek, which must substitute sigma. For a parallel instance, see omega 182 (note 47). Both chi (for Aramaic ק qaf) and theta (for Aramaic ת taw) function as aspirated plosives (equivalent to English "kit" and "top"). See Allen, 16-17. The theta is noteworthy insofar as its sound value parallels that of the taw (ת) in šaḇaqtani, hardened by silent shewa and dagesh lene. Moreover, the Aramaic in Greek transliteration bolsters the linguistic argument for the compound "chi-theta" as successive aspirated plosives. See Allen, 24-27. Aramaic taw, like its Hebrew counterpart, otherwise has a "th" (as in "both") value. See "Aramaic" in Encyclopaedia Judaica, 3.263; a modern descriptive approach is found in "Aramaic" (Kaufman). For theta as a fricative in Hebrew transliteration, see omega 182 (note 47).
That the Suda terminates the headword with eta rather than iota (paralleling the Aramaic khireq-yod or long "i") showcases a phonological shift in Greek. By the 3rd century CE, the Greek letters eta, and the digraph epsilon-iota (note the -ει alternative in Perschbacher) were sounded as long iota. See Allen, 74. The Suda compiler viewed eta as the more elegant solution. This feature bears directly on the Suda's own taxonomy: the homophones epsilon-iota, eta, and iota follow zeta in the Suda's "alphabetical" scheme. See "Suidas" in the Encyclopaedia Britannica, XXVI.51.
References:
Allen, W.S. Vox Graeca. Cambridge: Cambridge University, 1968
"Aramaic" in Encyclopaedia Judaica. Jerusalem: Encyclopaedia Judaica, 1973
Brown, F., Driver, S.R., and Briggs, C.A. A Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament. Oxford: Clarendon, 1951
Danker, F.W. A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2000
Kautzsch, E. Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar. Oxford: Clarendon, 1910
Kelley, P.H. Biblical Hebrew: An Introductory Grammar. Grand Rapids: William B. Erdmans, 1992
Kohlenberger, J.R. The Interlinear Hebrew-English Old Testament. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1987
Kaufman, S.A. "Aramaic" in Hetzron, R. The Semitic Languages. New York: Routledge, 1997
Perschbacher, W.J. The New Analytical Greek Lexicon. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1996
"Suidas" in Encyclopaedia Britannica. Cambridge: Cambridge University, 1910
Keywords: Christianity; chronology; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 4 December 1999@16:23:20.
Vetted by:
Raphael Finkel on 9 December 1999@11:17:30.
Elizabeth Vandiver on 14 December 1999@16:17:44.
Craig Miller on 27 May 2002@01:29:46.
Craig Miller (Reformatted translation; modified/expanded notes; added bibliography; expanded keywords. Cosmetics pending by editor.) on 27 May 2002@01:58:58.
Craig Miller (Cosmetics) on 27 May 2002@15:48:11.
Craig Miller on 27 May 2002@16:11:44.
Catharine Roth (added cross-reference) on 4 October 2002@00:55:00.
Raphael Finkel (Added Hebrew and Aramaic characters.) on 31 October 2002@10:06:56.
Raphael Finkel (Minor fixes.) on 31 October 2002@12:39:23.
Elizabeth Vandiver (Added italics; cosmetics) on 12 February 2005@21:58:54.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 1 March 2006@01:08:11.
David Whitehead (another keyword; tweaks and cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@06:21:33.
Catharine Roth (coding, typo) on 5 August 2013@00:57:53.
Raphael Finkel (Fixed translation of LXX; changed to ISO 259 Romanization of Hebrew and Aramaic.) on 7 August 2014@13:30:23.
Raphael Finkel (Standardized Romanization fonts.) on 7 August 2014@13:46:48.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:25:56.

Headword: Ἀβδέλυκτα
Adler number: alpha,25
Translated headword: unhateful [things]
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] those which do not cause pollution, at which one would not feel disgust or hatred. The word [is] somewhat tragic.[1] Aeschylus in Myrmidons [writes]: "indeed, for I love them, they are unhateful to me."[2]
Greek Original:
Ἀβδέλυκτα: τὰ μὴ μιαίνοντα, ἃ οὐκ ἄν τις βδελυχθείη καὶ δυσχεράνειε. τραγικωτέρα δὲ ἡ λέξις. Αἰσχύλος Μυρμιδόσι: καὶ μὴν, φιλῶ γὰρ, ἀβδέλυκτ' ἐμοὶ τάδε.
Notes:
The headword, presumably extracted from the quotation given, is neuter plural of this adjective.
cf. generally (by way of opposites) beta 197, beta 198, beta 199, beta 200, beta 201, etc.
= Photius, Lexicon alpha33 Theodoridis (Phrynichus, Praeparatio Sophistica fr. 40), and very similar to Synagoge (Codex B) alpha12; cf. Hesychius alpha94.
[1] cf. tau 659.
[2] Aeschylus fr. 137 Nauck.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:23:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:42:07.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmnented notes; cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:40:31.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:28:36.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:38.
William Hutton (Augmented and modified notes) on 11 November 2007@07:20:53.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; another keyword; tweaks) on 19 December 2011@06:28:05.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:35:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:31:12.

Headword: Ἄβδηρα
Adler number: alpha,26
Translated headword: Abdera
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The sea, and a name of a city[1] and 'Abderite' [is] the citizen [of it].[2]
Also Phalera and Kythera [sc. are spelled with eta]; but Gadeira, Stageira, Topeira, and Dobeira [sc. are spelled with epsiloniota].[3]
Greek Original:
Ἄβδηρα: ἡ θάλασσα, καὶ ὄνομα πόλεως καὶ Ἀβδηρίτης ὁ πολίτης. καὶ Φάληρα καὶ Κύθηρα. Γάδειρα δὲ καὶ Στάγειρα καὶ Τόπειρα καὶ Δόβειρα.
Notes:
[1] Actually, as Stephanus of Byzantium and others noted, there were two cities called Abdera: one, the present-day Avdira, in northern Greece (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid D3; RE I.22-23; OCD(4) s.v.); the other, the present-day Adra, in southern Spain (Barrington Atlas map 27 grid B5). But the idea of Abdera as 'the sea' is unintelligible.
[2] Similarly glossed in the Etymologicum Magnum and the Lexicon Ambrosianum. An "Abderite" could also signify someone generically stupid: see LSJ s.v. Ἀβδηρίτης (web address 1 below).
[3] These six city-names (whether spelled with an eta, like Abdera, or epsilon-iota; there would have been little difference in pronounciation by the time of the Suda) generate an ethnikon in the same way. See also delta 1318, sigma 977. This part of the entry, Adler reports, is lacking in mss A (= Parisinus 2625), G (= Parisinus 2623), and T (= Vaticanus 881).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:24:49.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added note.) on 30 July 2000@22:42:39.
David Whitehead (modified translation and notes) on 18 September 2000@05:28:33.
William Hutton (Cosmetics) on 20 January 2001@23:00:39.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added cross-reference, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:38:55.
Catharine Roth (punctuation) on 4 October 2007@10:32:59.
David Whitehead (augmented n.1 (and corrected note numbering)) on 5 October 2007@03:15:34.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:58:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@06:31:43.
Catharine Roth (betacode cosmetics) on 20 December 2011@15:48:25.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@03:47:11.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:08:37.

Headword: Ἀβδιού
Adler number: alpha,27
Translated headword: Abdiou, Obadiah
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
Ἀβδιού: ὄνομα κύριον.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (30).
Accented as it is (oxytone), nominative. The book of the prophet Obadiah in the Septuagint has the title ΑΒΔΙΟΥ and Ὅρασις Ἀβδιου "Obadiah's Vision"; the name has no accent, as a Hebrew name, so its case cannot be determined. Hesychius gives the name as oxytone, with the gloss ἑρμηνεύεται δοῦλος ἐξομολογητός "it is interpreted as acknowledged servant."
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:25:23.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Set status) on 20 January 2001@22:55:17.
David Whitehead (added note; changed keyword) on 21 January 2001@05:52:35.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 4 October 2007@01:17:58.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords) on 19 December 2011@06:35:03.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@06:58:15.

Headword: Ἀβέβαιος
Adler number: alpha,28
Translated headword: unreliable, unsteady
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning he who/that which is] unstable and easily overturned.
Greek Original:
Ἀβέβαιος: ὁ ἀσταθὴς καὶ εὐμετάτρεπτος.
Notes:
Entry not paralleled in other lexica.
cf. alpha 4345, epsilon 2557, pi 88.
Keywords: definition; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:26:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set keyword and status) on 20 January 2001@23:04:33.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 21 January 2001@01:32:39.
David Whitehead (added x-refs; cosmetics) on 9 June 2003@07:11:20.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, removed link) on 4 October 2007@01:20:48.
David Whitehead (another hw option; modified note) on 19 December 2011@06:41:50.
David Whitehead (another keyword; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@09:07:22.

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