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Headword: Aages
Adler number: alpha,2
Translated headword: unbroken, unbreakable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] unshattered,[1] strong.
Greek Original:
Aages: athrauston, ischuron.
Notes:
= Apollonius Sophistes, Lexicon Homericum 2.4. Likewise in Hesychius alpha7; Photius, Lexicon alpha4 Theodoridis; Etymologicum Gudianum 1.12. This form of the adjective is the neuter nominative singular, as at Homer, Odyssey 11.575 (web address 1).
All but the last word of this entry is absent from ms M (= Marcianus 448), as are the last several words of alpha 1 (a and b).
[1] cf. alpha 750.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 20 August 1998@17:55:22.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised status) on 26 September 2000@13:50:00.
Ross Scaife ✝ (testing) on 22 June 2001@13:33:15.
Catharine Roth (added link and keywords) on 6 March 2002@00:09:12.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; cosmetics) on 22 July 2003@09:58:28.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added keyword, set status) on 19 August 2007@10:53:47.
David Whitehead (restored lost keywords) on 19 August 2007@11:26:45.
William Hutton (augmented headword) on 20 August 2007@08:18:48.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:09:21.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:45:02.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 16 December 2011@11:36:59.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@05:57:53.

Headword: Aadein
Adler number: alpha,3
Translated headword: to disturb
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] to harass, to be at a loss, to be treated unjustly,[1] to go hungry.
Greek Original:
Aadein: ochlein, aporein, adikeisthai, asitein.
Notes:
Same entry in other lexica: Apollonius' Homeric Lexicon (2.14), Hesychius alpha10, Photius alpha5 Theodoridis, and cf. Etymologicum Gudianum 1.15. The headword is otherwise unattested -- and the range of active and passive meanings suggests that the lexicographers may have been guessing at a meaning, perhaps on the basis of the (not improbable, but see Chantraine s.v. a)ada) etymology of a-privative + a(d- ('please', 'delight').
[1] This third gloss is absent from ms M (= Marcianus 448).
Reference:
P. Chantraine, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque, ed. 2 Paris 2009.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; food
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@08:53:07.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised vetting status) on 26 September 2000@14:27:33.
David Whitehead (changed keyword; added note) on 27 February 2003@07:06:07.
William Hutton (augmented notes, added keywords, set status) on 19 August 2007@12:29:45.
William Hutton (typo) on 19 August 2007@17:07:52.
William Hutton (modified note) on 20 August 2007@08:24:19.
William Hutton (added note) on 20 August 2007@08:25:47.
William Hutton on 20 August 2007@08:38:45.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode) on 22 March 2008@17:11:48.
Jennifer Benedict (tweak to note) on 24 March 2008@23:12:53.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:46:40.
Catharine Roth (added bibliography) on 1 January 2012@23:17:55.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:02:40.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 18 December 2014@22:28:37.

Headword: Aalion
Adler number: alpha,4
Translated headword: undisciplined
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] disorderly, powerless.[1]
But a(/lion [means] in vain.[2]
Greek Original:
Aalion: atakton, akrates. Halion de to mataion.
Notes:
[1] Up to this point the entry = Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 2.14, and Photius, Lexicon alpha6 Theodoridis; cf. also Hesychius alpha17. The headword is unattested outside lexica and grammars (and attested there only in this neuter singular nominative/accusative form, presumably quoted from somewhere). Schwyzer in DGE suggests an etymology from alpha-privative + the root of a(/lis ('sufficient').
[2] This addendum, for which cf. alpha 1237, is lacking in ms S (= Vaticanus 1296).
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:46:59.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Minor alterations, set status.) on 14 October 2000@00:43:32.
David Whitehead (added note) on 9 February 2001@04:26:22.
David Whitehead (betacoding and other cosmetics) on 2 October 2005@10:42:58.
David Whitehead (augmented notes) on 15 August 2007@09:37:04.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, set status) on 19 August 2007@17:59:45.
William Hutton (augmented note) on 20 August 2007@08:43:59.
Jennifer Benedict (tweak to note) on 24 March 2008@23:13:44.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:57:27.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:03:49.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 29 March 2015@22:40:29.

Headword: Abba
Adler number: alpha,10
Translated headword: Abba, Father
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The ancients called God "Father" from a feeling of relationship. Moses said, "You have forsaken God who begot you."[1] And Malachi: "One God begot us and is our father."[2] They were in a state of grace, moved by the force of the Spirit. Just as there is the Spirit of wisdom by which fools have become wise (for this is clear from the teachings), and the Spirit of power by which they raised both the weak and the dead, and the Spirit of prophecy, and the Spirit of tongues, so also there is the Spirit of adoption.[3] And just as we know the Spirit of prophecy, through which one who has it is moved by grace to tell the future, so also the Spirit of adoption, through which one moved by the Spirit calls God "Father." One who wishes to show that this is most legitimate even used a Hebrew word. For he did not say "Father" but "Abba the Father." This is the word used especially by legitimate children for their father.[4]
Greek Original:
Abba: ho patêr. hoi men palaioi ekaloun patera ton theon ex oikeias dianoias, hôs Môüsês: theon ton gennêsanta se enkatelipes: kai Malachias: ho theos heis egennêsen hêmas kai patêr: hoi de en chariti, apo pneumatikês energeias kinoumenoi. hôsper pneuma sophias einai, kath' ho sophoi hoi asophoi egenonto [kai dêloutai touto apo tês didaskalias] kai pneuma dunameôs einai, kath' ho kai astheneis kai nekrous êgeiron, kai pneuma prophêteias, kai pneuma glôssôn, houtô kai pneuma huiothesias. kai hôsper ismen to pneuma tês prophêteias, aph' hôn ho echôn auto legei ta mellonta hupo tês charitos kinoumenos, houtô dê kai pneuma huiothesias, aph' hou ho labôn patera kalei ton theon, hupo pneumatos kinoumenos. ho dê boulomenos deixai gnêsiôtaton on kai têi tôn Hebraiôn echrêsato glôttêi. ou gar eipen ho patêr, all' abba ho patêr: hoper tôn paidôn malista esti tôn gnêsiôn pros patera rhêma.
Notes:
A paraphrase of St. John Chrysostom, Homily on the Epistle to the Romans PG 60.527.
(Entry placed after alpha 16, Adler reports, in mss GTMB.)
[1] Deuteronomy 32:18 LXX (web address 1).
[2] Malachi 2:10 LXX (web address 2).
[3] cf. Ep.Romans 8:15 (web address 3).
[4] On "Abba," see also alpha 12.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2,
Web address 3
Keywords: children; Christianity; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; medicine; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:57:30.
Vetted by:
Samuel Huskey (added links to Bible, changed "sonship" to "filiation") on 15 July 2000@15:01:55.
Catharine Roth (Altered wording.) on 29 July 2000@23:15:23.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 11 July 2003@08:51:36.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 6 October 2005@08:51:18.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, augmented notes, fixed broken links, added keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@10:15:40.
Catharine Roth (upgraded links) on 5 August 2013@01:15:24.
David Whitehead (another note; cosmetics) on 28 March 2014@06:14:49.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation, added cross-reference) on 28 March 2014@12:15:01.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:24:11.

Headword: Abasanistos
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
Abasanistos: agumnastos ê anexetastos, adokimastos. eirêtai de apo tês basanou tês chrusochoïkês lithou, en hêi dokimazousi to chrusion. echrêsato de Ailianos en tôi peri pronoias tôi abasanistos anti tou aneu odunês.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] ba/sanos can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.

Headword: Abdiou
Adler number: alpha,27
Translated headword: Abdiou, Obadiah
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
Abdiou: onoma kurion.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (30).
Accented as it is (oxytone), nominative. The book of the prophet Obadiah in the Septuagint has the title *a*b*d*i*o*u and *(/orasis *)abdiou "Obadiah's Vision"; the name has no accent, as a Hebrew name, so its case cannot be determined. Hesychius gives the name as oxytone, with the gloss e(rmhneu/etai dou=los e)comologhto/s "it is interpreted as acknowledged servant."
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:25:23.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Set status) on 20 January 2001@22:55:17.
David Whitehead (added note; changed keyword) on 21 January 2001@05:52:35.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 4 October 2007@01:17:58.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords) on 19 December 2011@06:35:03.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@06:58:15.

Headword: Abelterôtatoi
Adler number: alpha,33
Translated headword: most thoughtless, very thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Aristophanes [writes]: "before this most/very thoughtless men used to sit gaping -- Dolts, Half-wits".[1]
Greek Original:
Abelterôtatoi: Aristophanês: teôs d' abelterôtatoi kechênotes Mammakuthoi Melitidai kathêntai.
Notes:
(Entry lacking, Adler reports, in ms S.)
Masculine nominative plural of this superlative, evidently from the quotation given. See also alpha 31, alpha 32.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 989-991 (web address 1), quoted also at beta 468 and mu 121. The other two terms used here (each of them apparently stemming from a proper name) stand at least as much in need of glossing as does this adjective: see Dover (below) 315-16. For the formation of the adjective, see also the entry in LSJ s.v. (web address 2 below).
Reference:
Aristophanes, Frogs, edited with introduction and commentary by K.J. Dover (Oxford 1993)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:03:23.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented note; added bibliography; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:29:41.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 11 January 2001@12:49:46.
William Hutton on 2 February 2001@11:46:00.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 23 March 2008@14:05:57.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@05:10:07.
Catharine Roth on 13 April 2009@13:11:48.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:29:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:25:45.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:24.
David Whitehead (another note) on 28 March 2014@06:25:35.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 April 2015@09:16:57.

Headword: Abimelech
Adler number: alpha,45
Translated headword: Abimelech
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.[1]
The son of Gideon.[2] He smote his brothers, seventy sons of Gideon's wives,[3] upon a single stone, and none of them was left except Jotham the youngest son,[4] who ran away. As Abimelech was passing through with his people, Jotham went up to the top of the mountain and, raising his voice, told the following parable. "Listen to me, men of Shechem, and God will listen to you. The trees set out[5] to anoint a king over themselves. And they said to the olive, 'Rule over us.' And the olive said to them, 'Should I give up my rich oil, by which -- through me -- God[6] and men receive honor,[7] and go rule over trees?' Then the trees said to the fig, 'Come, rule over us.' And the fig said to them, 'Should I give up my sweetness, my excellent product, and go to rule over the trees?' And the trees said to the vine, 'Come, rule over us.' And the vine said to them, 'Should I give up my wine, merriment for men, and go to rule over the trees?' And all the trees said to the thornbush, 'Come, you rule over us.' And the thornbush said to the trees, 'If you are truly anointing me to rule over you, come stand under[8] my shade. But if not, may fire come from me and consume the cedars of Lebanon.' Now, if you have dealt with my father and his family truthfully and in an upright way, and have made his concubine's son Abimelech king over the men of Shechem, then may you rejoice in him and may he indeed rejoice in you. But if not, may fire issue from Abimelech and consume your leaders and their families. And may fire issue from the men of Shechem and consume Abimelech." And Jotham ran from the presence of Abimelech his brother. But Abimelech ruled over Israel for three years. Then God sent an evil spirit between[9] Abimelech and the men of Shechem. And the men of Shechem dealt treacherously[10] with the house of Abimelech so to lay at Abimelech's feet[11] the blood of Gideon's seventy sons. And so Abimilech set out to beseige the tower.[12] As he approached the tower gate to burn it, a woman threw a piece of a millstone onto his head and crushed his skull. He at once called out to his armor bearer[13], saying, "Draw your sword and kill me, so they can never say I was killed by a woman." So the young man took up his sword and ran him through. And God recompensed the wickedness Abimelech had done to his father in killing his seventy brothers. God also recompensed[14] all the wickedness of the men of Shechem, in accord with the message and parable of Jotham.
Greek Original:
Abimelech: onoma kurion. huios Gedeôn. houtos epataxe tous adelphous autou ek tôn eleutherôn andras ebdomêkonta epi lithon hena, ex hôn ouk apeleiphthê plên Iôatham tou neôterou diadrantos. hos kai paraporeuomenou tou Abimelech meta tou laou anêlthen epi tên koruphên tou orous, kai eparas tên phônên autou ephê pros autous parabolên toiautên. akousate mou, andres Sikimôn, kai akousei humôn ho theos. poreuomena eporeuthêsan ta xula tou chrisai basilea eph' heautôn. kai eipan têi elaiai: basileuson eph' hêmôn. kai eipen autois hê elaia: apheisa tên piotêta mou, hên edoxasen en emoi ho theos kai hoi anthrôpoi, poreuthô archein tôn xulôn; kai eipon ta xula têi sukêi: deuro, basileuson eph' hêmas. kai eipen autois hê sukê: apheisa tên glukutêta mou kai to gennêma mou to agathon poreuthô archein tôn xulôn; kai eipon ta xula pros tên ampelon: deuro, basileuson eph' hêmôn. kai eipen autois hê ampelos: apheisa ton oinon mou kai tên euphrosunên tôn anthrôpôn poreuthô archein tôn xulôn; kai eipon panta ta xula têi rhamnôi: deuro, su basileuson eph' hêmas. kai eipen hê rhamnos pros ta xula: ei en alêtheiai chriete me humeis tou basileuein eph' humas, deute, hupostête en têi skiai mou, kai ei mê, exelthoi pur ap' emou kai kataphagêi tas kedrous tou Libanou. kai nun ei en alêtheiai kai hosiotêti epoiêsate meta tou patros mou kai meta tou oikou autou kai ebasileusate ton Abimelech huion tês paidiskês autou epi tous andras Sikimôn, euphrantheiête en autôi, kai euphrantheiê kai ge autos en humin: ei de mê, exelthoi pur ex Abimelech kai kataphagoi tous archontas humôn kai tous oikous autôn: kai exelthoi pur ek tôn andrôn Sikimôn kai kataphagoi ton Abimelech. kai apedra Iôatham apo prosôpou Abimelech adelphou autou. ho de Abimelech êrxen epi ton Israêl etê tria. kai exapesteilen ho theos pneuma ponêron ana meson Abimelech kai ana meson andrôn Sikimôn. kai êthetêsan hoi andres Sikimôn en tôi oikôi Abimelech tou epagagein adikian kai to haima tôn o# huiôn Gedeôn epi tên kephalên Abimelech. kai gar apelthôn polemêsai purgon kai prosengisas têi thurai tou purgou emprêsai autên, erripse gunê klasma mulou epi tên kephalên autou kai sunetripse to kranion autou. kai epiboêsas tachu eipe pros ton aironta autou ta skeuê: spason tên rhomphaian sou kai thanatôson me, mê pote eipôsin: gunê auton apekteine. kai kentêsan auton to paidarion aneile. kai epestrepsen ho theos tên ponêrian Abimelech, hên epoiêse tôi patri autou apokteinas tous o# adelphous autou. kai pasan tên ponêrian andrôn Sikimôn epestrepsen ho theos eis tên kephalên autôn kata ton logon kai tên paroimian Iôatham.
Notes:
Source for the main paragraph (after the initial gloss): George the Monk, Chronicon 148.2-149.20.
[1] Hebrew: אבימלך "my father is king." Used derogatorily and incessantly (31 times) throughout the Abimelech episode in Judges 9 (Boling, NSRV at Judges 9:1).
[2] Literally, "by his wives." The use of e)leuqe/rwn here indicates "married women/wives" (see L-S-J). The Massoretic Text (MT) (Judges 8:30; Kohlenberger, Vol. 2, 101) shows נשים našīm, which here means "wives" (Brown, Driver, Briggs {BDB}, 61). The term is to be distinguished from that for Abimelech's mother — פלגש pilegeš "concubine" in the sense of a legitimate wife of secondary rank (Kohlenberger for the suffixed MT form; Boling, NRSV at Judges 8:31).
[3] Literally, "upon a single stone." MT: על אבן אחת ʿal ʾeḇen ʾeḥat (Judges 9:5). See Boling, Judges (Anchor), 171.5. A direct transference from the Hebrew to the LXX.
[4] (Cf. iota 478.) The Greek new/terou, comparative understood for the superlative (Smyth, 1082.a) from Hebrew הקטן haqqaton, the "young(est) one" (Judges 9:5).
[5] The Suda's poreu/omena e)poreu/qhsan parallels the MT at Judges 9:5 (but not the LXX, which singularizes the finite verb) in its fuller anthropomorphism via the plural finite verb. The participle plus finite verb mimics, but does not parallel, MT usage, which gives infinitive absolute plus finite verb (הלוך הלכו haloḵ halēḵū) (Kautzsch, 342 {113o(1)}; Boling, Judges (Anchor), 173.8). For this genre of fable, see also 2 Kings 14:9-10 and its shadow at 2 Chronicles 25:18-19. the motif bears only general resemblance to Aesop's frog fable. For related motifs, see the source summary in Brown (The New Jerome), 140; Boling, Judges (Anchor), 173.
[6] The Suda singularizes (o( qeo/s), whereas the MT contains אלהים elohīm to be interpreted as "gods" — not "God." That the translation warrants a plural is supported by the antiquity of the original motif (Boling, Judges (Anchor), 173-74.15; 175.20). The plural is the norm in modern Bible translation.
[7] The standard translation of the MT אשר-בי יכבדו אלהים ואנשים ʾašer-bī yeḵaḇdū ʾelohīm waʾanašīm (Judges 9:9) and the Suda's h(\n...a)/nqrwpoi is "by which/whereby gods and men are honored." The Hebrew syntax merits reevaluation. The Jotham parable is a poetic fable cast in prose (Boling, Judges (Anchor) 166, 172-73.8-15, 173.15; for an uncritical opposing view, see Brown (The New Jerome), 140). However, Boling (173.9) and others read the Pi'el active yeḵaḇdū ("ykbdw" in Boling) as a Niph'al passive (are honored). Boling also cites the "kbd" root as Niph'al reflexive in Exodus 14:4, perhaps intending an alternative (but unlikely) reading for Judges 9:9 as "gods and men honor themselves." This approach overlooks the fable's poetic form — a medium that allows the Pi'el to operate intransitively (Kautzsch, 142 {52k}). Relatedly, Kautzsch (Gesenius, in accord with T.K Cheyne) assigns Niph'al senses to Pi'el forms in the poetry of Isaiah 48:8 and 60:11, which just as easily may be read intransitively as "your ear has not opened (responded) [to new things]" and "your gates shall always stand open." In Judges 9:9, the intransitive result is "(by) which, through me, gods and men receive honor." The preposition "bi" (Greek: e)n e)moi\), which in Boling's syntax is left "unexplained", provides an instrumental dative (BDB, 89, III.2): "through me." Boling asserts "bi" to be "a third-person suffix" without further discussion; BDB (citing George F. Moore) suggests the third-person "bo" (by/through it) for the "bi" form. Boling does cite the LXX Vaticanus reading "by it"; however, Vaticanus works a simplified solution: e)n h(=i doca/sousi to\n qeo\n a)/ndres, "by which men shall honor God" (Brenton, 329). In a near parallel to the MT, the Suda records e)do/casen for a Hebraicized-intransitive e)do/casan (yeḵaḇdū): literally, "regarding which (oil), through my agency, God and men receive honor."
[8] The verb u(po/sthte also carries the meaning "submit"; the Hebrew at Judges 9:15 (imperative hasū) carries only the sense "take refuge" (BDB, 340).
[9] The duplicated a)na\ me/son is a Hebraism paralleling Judges 9:22 (בין אבימלך ובין בעלי שכם bēn ʾAḇimeleḵ uḇēn baʿalē šeḵem). See also the MT and LXX at Genesis 1:4. For model Greek syntax, see LXX Genesis 32:16 (Brenton, 43)— with the MT (Genesis 32:17) showing the duplicate pattern (Kohlenberger, Vol 1, 88).
[10] For a)qete/w (deal treacherously), see Lust, Pt. I, 9.
[11] Literally, "to lay upon Abimelech's head his injustice and the blood of Gideon's seventy sons."
[12] For Abimelech's ill-fated siege of the Thebez tower, see Judges 9:50-57.
[13] The term paida/rion reprises the MT נערו naʿarō (his servant or retainer) at Judges 9:54. Translations render the word as "armor bearer." Boling in his Judges (146.10; 182.54) prefers "squire."
[14] Literally, "turned about onto their head."
References:
Boling, R.G. Judges (The Anchor Bible). New York: Doubleday, 1975.
Boling, R.G. Judges in the Harper Collins Study Bible (NRSV). New York: Harper Collins, 1993.
Brenton, C.L.B. The Septuagint with Apocrypha. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1991 (reprint of 1851 ed.).
Brown, F. Driver, S.R., Briggs, C.A. A Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament. Oxford: Clarendon, 1951.
Brown, R.E. The New Jerome Biblical Commentary. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1990.
Kautzsch, E. Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar. Oxford: Clarendon, 1910.
Kohlenberger, J.R. The Interlinear NIV Hebrew-English Old Testament. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1987.
Lust, J. A Greek-English Lexicon of the Septuagint, Part I. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, 1992.
Smyth, H.W. Greek Grammar. Cambridge: Harvard University, 1984.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; history; military affairs; poetry; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@13:01:24.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 27 January 2001@12:09:36.
Craig Miller (Modified translation, notes and bibliography to follow.) on 5 March 2002@09:51:09.
Craig Miller on 5 March 2002@12:40:52.
Craig Miller (Modified and expanded notes, expanded keywords. Bibliography pending.) on 5 March 2002@15:02:20.
Catharine Roth (corrected typos) on 5 March 2002@16:49:22.
Craig Miller on 5 March 2002@23:39:58.
Craig Miller (Bibliography added, cosmetics.) on 6 March 2002@07:38:16.
Craig Miller on 6 March 2002@12:49:31.
Craig Miller on 6 March 2002@14:59:18.
Craig Miller on 1 April 2002@19:33:02.
Raphael Finkel (Added Hebrew texts.) on 31 October 2002@10:19:01.
David Whitehead (added initial note; added x-ref; cosmetics) on 9 June 2003@07:55:20.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 7 August 2013@23:53:33.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 8 August 2013@16:40:29.
Raphael Finkel (Converted Romanization of Hebrew to ISO 259.) on 7 August 2014@14:15:44.
David Whitehead (coding) on 15 August 2015@07:31:59.

Headword: Abisaros
Adler number: alpha,52
Translated headword: Abisaros, Abisareis
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Name of a place.
Greek Original:
Abisaros: onoma topou.
Note:
In the mountains of NE India, present-day Hazara: Sanskrit Abhisara; Barrington Atlas map 6 grid C3. The Atlas uses the nominative plural Abisareis, which is found in e.g. Arrian, Indica 4.12, and represents a pluralisation of the (Greek version of the) ruler's name, Abisares; and the Suda's Abisaros is presumably a non-existent nominative derived from the genitive of this name, Abisarou.
Reference:
A.B.Bosworth, Commentary on Arrian's History of Alexander, ii (1995) 177-8.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; historiography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:04:58.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headword and note) on 9 October 2000@06:54:33.
David Whitehead (augmented note, keywords, bibliog) on 28 August 2006@12:26:54.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 23 March 2008@20:12:21.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 17 November 2009@18:45:50.
David Whitehead on 1 August 2011@07:38:51.

Headword: Abolêtôr
Adler number: alpha,59
Translated headword: meeter
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Or[1] a)/bolos ["un-shedder"], a donkey that has not yet shed its teeth, from which the animal's age is known. Similarly, a young animal that does not yet have its indicators.[2] An 'indicator' is what they call a tooth that falls out, by which they verify the age. These teeth are also called 'finished,' by a metaphor from the animals themselves. The a)pognw/mones are those who have grown old and lost their indicators. Also [sc. attested is the phrase] 'unshed foals',[3] those who have not yet lost teeth.
Greek Original:
Abolêtôr kai Abolis. ê Abolos, onos ho mêdepô beblêkôs odontas, ex hou gnôrizetai hê hêlikia tou zôiou. ek de toutou ho neos oudepô gnômona echôn. gnômona de elegon ton ballomenon odonta, di' hou tas hêlikias exêtazon: ton de auton kai katêrtukota elegon, ek metaphoras tôn tetrapodôn. kai apognômonas tous apogegêrakotas, hois eleloipei to gnôrisma. kai Abolous pôlous, tous mêdepô beblêkotas odontas.
Notes:
[1] The entry has begun with two unglossed headwords, a)bolh/twr ('one who meets': LSJ -- web address 1 below) and a)/bolis (attested only here; not in LSJ).
[2] gnw/mwn; cf. gamma 347, kappa 1061.
[3] Accusative plural, evidently quoted from somewhere.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; medicine; science and technology; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:11:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, augmented notes, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:25:55.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:15:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 18 October 2005@05:37:54.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics, betacode) on 25 March 2008@11:23:51.
David Whitehead (modified headword; augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@11:38:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 24 August 2010@16:57:08.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:26:52.

Headword: Aboulei
Adler number: alpha,60
Translated headword: inconsiderately, unintentionally
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] without consideration, mindlessly, ignorantly.[1]
"Though he certainly had not guessed the king's opinion, he accomplished it quite unintentionally."[2]
Greek Original:
Aboulei: aboulôs, aphronôs, amathôs. ho de ou sphodra stochazomenos tês tou basileôs gnômês aboulotata diepraxato.
Notes:
The headword adverb, noted for its form by grammarians, is presumably extracted from somewhere (other than the quotation given).
[1] cf. generally alpha 64.
[2] Polybius fr. 92 Büttner-Wobst. The quotation employs the superlative form of the adverb (a)boulo/tata) rendered here by 'quite unintentionally'. Although accepting the fragment himself, Büttner-Wobst notes that Dindorf maintained that this fragment cannot be genuinely Polybian, because Polybius does not use the verb diapra/casqai, except in a positive context (p. 527).
Reference:
T. Büttner-Wobst, ed., Polybii Historiae, vol. IV, (Leipzig 1904)
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:11:52.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, translation and note, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:33:11.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:17:38.
Catharine Roth (cosmetic) on 23 April 2002@11:16:43.
David Whitehead (added primary note and another hw option; more keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@08:33:31.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@10:32:52.
Ronald Allen (added bibliography, supplemented n.2) on 25 April 2018@22:49:34.
Ronald Allen (cosmeticule (bibliography)) on 4 June 2018@23:45:53.

Headword: Habra bainôn
Adler number: alpha,70
Translated headword: walking delicately
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] being conceited, being indolent.[1]
"Walking truly delicately, that fellow seemed to be holding his eyebrows up in the air."[2]
Greek Original:
Habra bainôn: thruptomenos, blakeuomenos. ekeinos ontôs habra bainôn edokei echôn tas ophrus huperêrmenas anô.
Notes:
See generally LSJ s.v. a(bro/s (web address 1).
[1] The headword phrase has the same or similar glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha49 Theodoridis. It could be extracted from the quotation given, but is more likely to be quoted from Euripides, Trojan Women 820. (So Latte on Hesychius s.v. and more tentatively Theodoridis on Photius s.v.)
[2] Quotation (transmitted, in Adler's view, via the Excerpta Constantini Porphyrogeniti) unidentifiable.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:27:05.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, set status) on 30 January 2001@23:11:22.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added note; cosmetics) on 31 January 2001@04:28:51.
Jennifer Benedict (added links) on 25 March 2008@11:53:43.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 26 March 2008@03:49:27.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@09:07:56.
David Whitehead (modified notes) on 1 February 2012@05:31:39.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 12 August 2013@22:35:19.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:07:06.
Catharine Roth (typo, coding) on 14 February 2015@10:46:33.
David Whitehead (expanded a note) on 2 April 2015@10:36:52.

Headword: Abrikton
Adler number: alpha,78
Translated headword: deaf
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] that which is hard of hearing.[1]
Or hearing [only] in part.[2]
Greek Original:
Abrikton: to duskôphon. êtoi to ek merous akouon.
Notes:
[1] Neuter nominative/accusative singular of this adjective; same glossing in Hesychius and, according to Adler, the Ambrosian Lexicon; evidently quoted from somewhere.
LSJ defines the word as 'wakeful', from bri/zein "be sleepy"; see web address 1 below. The two versions of the gloss reappear at delta 1651.
[2] In some mss. only.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; medicine
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:32:56.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added note, set status) on 31 January 2001@13:18:20.
William Hutton on 31 January 2001@13:20:34.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:24:59.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, with cross-reference) on 4 February 2005@14:56:41.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@11:54:45.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords) on 26 March 2008@03:52:22.
David Whitehead (augmented notes) on 19 December 2011@09:44:14.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@10:42:25.

Headword: Abromios
Adler number: alpha,84
Translated headword: Bromios-less, Bromius-less
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] without wine.
"If I escape through the wave of destructive fire, I tell you I will drink for one hundred suns from dewy streams, Bromios-less[1] and wine-less." In the Epigrams.[2]
Greek Original:
Abromios: chôris oinou. ên oloou dia kuma phugô puros, eis hekaton soi êelious droseran piomai ek libadôn, abromios kai aoinos. en Epigrammasin.
Notes:
The headword is presumably extracted from the epigram quoted, its only attestation outside lexicography.
[1] Bromios is a name frequently given to Dionysos (delta 1185): see beta 547.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.291.3-5 (author unknown), the vow of a wine-loving woman, should her fever break; cf. Gow and Page (vol. I, 74-77), mu 1022, and sigma 955. This epigram appears twice in the Anthologia Palatina (AP). In the first instance, it is attributed to Antipater of Thessalonica. But in the second instance (inserted after 9.164), and following redaction by the AP scribe designated C (the Corrector), it is noted to be a)de/spoton, anonymous (ibid. and vol. II, 100-101)
References:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. II, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: definition; ethics; food; imagery; medicine; poetry; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:37:23.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, added note and keywords, set status) on 1 February 2001@09:40:10.
David Whitehead (modified headword; tweaked translation; x-refs; cosmetics) on 3 January 2005@10:37:13.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 20 December 2011@04:12:25.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 21 December 2011@01:49:18.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@11:06:04.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.2, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keywords) on 23 October 2018@18:32:39.
Ronald Allen (typo n.2 second cross-reference) on 23 October 2018@18:40:26.
Ronald Allen (corrected epigram attribution in n.2, added bibliography entry) on 29 October 2018@13:29:47.

Headword: Habros
Adler number: alpha,87
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] bright, delicate, tender.[1]
In the Epigrams: "a cicada sat above a cithara delicately murmuring."[2]
"All the same that fellow is dainty and delicate and weakened by the softness of his body and depraved and with his hair done up like the most licentious little courtesans. And when he goes in to see the king his face and his curly hair are always delicately dripping [with perfume], and he takes as much money from the communal difficulties as would satisfy even the legendary Midas."[3]
Greek Original:
Habros: lampros, trupheros, hapalos. en Epigrammasin: habron epitruzôn kitharas huper hezeto tettix. homôs de ho trupheros ekeinos kai habros kai hupo malakias tou sômatos kateagôs kai lelugismenos kai tas te komas anadoumenos, hôsper hai tôn hetairidôn aselgesterai, kai habrostages echôn aei to metôpon kai tous bostruchous, labôn chrusion ek tôn koinôn sumphorôn, hoson hikanon ên emplêsai kai ton ek tou muthou Midan, eiserrei pros ton basilea.
Notes:
For this adjective see already alpha alpha 73 and alpha 86, and again alpha 88.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha55 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.54.7 (Paulus Silentarius).
[3] Attributed by Hemsterhuys to Eunapius; again (in part) at alpha 1860.
Keywords: biography; clothing; daily life; definition; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; imagery; mythology; poetry; women; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:39:27.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 2 February 2001@12:21:50.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@06:35:10.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 3 January 2006@10:26:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 21 December 2011@04:35:18.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 December 2011@19:16:16.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:18:56.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@04:31:02.

Headword: Abrotê
Adler number: alpha,92
Translated headword: divine, holy
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[sc. a term applied to] night.
Because it is deprived [a-] of people [brotoi].[1]
Greek Original:
Abrotê: hê nux. para to esterêsthai brotôn.
Notes:
The headword occurs as an adjective describing night in Homer, Iliad 14.78 (web address 1). It recurs at Sophocles fr.269c 20 (of the darkness of death); and it is also a textual variant at (?)Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound 2 (applied to 'wilderness').
With the exception of this last instance (and contrary to the present entry), the word is best understood as a doublet for a)/mbrotos, 'immortal' (alpha 1540). See LSJ s.v. at web address 2.
[1] Addendum lacking, Adler reports, in mss AS.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:42:56.
Vetted by:
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@10:41:02.
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@10:52:34.
Frederick Williams on 29 October 1999@11:14:00.
Elizabeth Vandiver on 16 November 1999@14:44:14.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, augmented note, set keywords and status) on 1 February 2001@22:28:35.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 5 February 2003@09:56:18.
David Whitehead (tweaked hw; augmented notes; another keyword) on 21 December 2011@06:19:18.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 22 December 2011@19:26:00.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 4 October 2015@10:37:09.

Headword: Abroton
Adler number: alpha,94
Translated headword: people-less
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] lifeless, without sensation.
Greek Original:
Abroton: apsuchon, anaisthêton.
Notes:
Same or similar entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha59 Theodoridis. The headword, masculine accusative singular or neuter nominative/accusative singular of this adjective, must be quoted from somewhere.
cf. under alpha 92.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:44:21.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added note and keyword, set status) on 1 February 2001@22:37:19.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 3 January 2005@10:43:50.
David Whitehead (expanded note; another keyword) on 21 December 2011@06:26:50.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:26:01.

Headword: Habrunetai
Adler number: alpha,99
Translated headword: puts on airs
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] adorns oneself, is conceited, is boastful.
Greek Original:
Habrunetai: kosmeitai, thruptetai, kauchatai.
Note:
Same or similar entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha61 Theodoridis. This is comment, presumably, on one of the famous appearances of the headword in Attic tragedy: Aeschylus, Agamemnon 1205 (web address 1); Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus 1339 (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:48:03.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keyword and status) on 1 February 2001@23:04:11.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 27 February 2003@09:04:25.
Jennifer Benedict (added links and title tags) on 25 March 2008@12:05:09.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 26 March 2008@04:00:14.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 21 December 2011@06:47:48.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:29:27.
Catharine Roth (tweaked links) on 15 February 2017@01:28:24.

Headword: Agathotheleia
Adler number: alpha,116
Translated headword: desire for the good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the choice of good things.[1]
"When it comes to getting things done a desire for the good alone does not suffice; there is also a need for strength and perseverence."[2]
Greek Original:
Agathotheleia: hê tôn agathôn eklogê. ouk arkei tois pragmasin hê agathotheleia monon, alla dei kai rhômês kai epistrepheias.
Notes:
[1] The headword (a single word in the Greek) is a very rare feminine noun. It is glossed with this same phrase in the parallel entry in ps.-Zonaras.
[2] 'Anon.': LSJ s.v. Perhaps Polybius, according to Adler. But suggested as a fragment of Damascius by Asmus (fr. 20), and accepted as such by Zintzen (fr. 25) and Athanassiadi (fr. 158).
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; philosophy
Translated by: William Hutton on 31 March 2001@23:33:22.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@03:16:20.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 6 February 2003@00:06:33.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 12 October 2005@07:59:40.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:13:57.
David Whitehead (tweaking) on 4 April 2015@09:11:44.

Headword: Agathos
Adler number: alpha,120
Translated headword: good
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
From a)/ghmi, a)/gamai, [come] a)gasto/s [and] a)gaqo/s.
Greek Original:
Agathos: para to agêmi, agamai, agastos kai agathos.
Notes:
For the headword see also alpha 121 (likewise masculine), alpha 118, alpha 119 (neuter).
The present entry seems to assert an etymological connection between a)gaqo/s ('good') and these other words. The others are apparently interrelated: a)/ghmi seems to be an active version of the attested a)/gamai ('wonder at, admire'), and a)gasto/s means 'admired'. All are connected with the prefix a)ga-. The derivation of a)gaqo/s from the same prefix is not accepted nowadays, but scholars do not agree on any other derivation either.
Reference:
P. Chantraine, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque ed. 2 (Paris 2009) 5-6.
Keyword: dialects, grammar, and etymology
Translated by: William Hutton on 31 March 2001@23:45:05.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 6 May 2002@15:20:16.
David Whitehead (added x-refs; modified keywords; betacoding and other cosmetics) on 14 April 2004@05:02:12.
Jennifer Benedict (betacoding and beta-typo) on 26 March 2008@00:39:28.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation) on 4 July 2011@19:27:09.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 24 August 2011@15:14:48.
David Whitehead on 25 August 2011@03:20:49.

Headword: Agallei
Adler number: alpha,130
Translated headword: glorifies, honours
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning he/she/it] makes, prepares, adorns.
Greek Original:
Agallei: poiei, skeuazei, kosmei.
Notes:
= Eudemus 2a.22 and Synagoge (Codex B) alpha66; a longer one in Photius, Lexicon alpha86 Theodoridis, with two further glosses (tima|=, proseu/xetai).
The headword itself is third person singular, present indicative active, of a)ga/llw (cf. under alpha 131), evidently quoted from somewhere. The possibilities include Pindar, Nemeans 5.43, and Euripides, Hercules 379.
The verb is used especially of what one does to a deity: see LSJ (web address 1).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Elizabeth Vandiver on 21 November 1998@17:03:42.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@09:55:11.
Catharine Roth (added link) on 2 April 2001@10:15:38.
David Whitehead (augmented note and keywords; cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:21:54.
David Whitehead (expanded note; more keywords) on 22 December 2011@08:53:00.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:50:21.
William Hutton (updated references in notes) on 19 June 2016@09:56:08.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 19 June 2016@23:20:54.

Headword: Agalmatophoroumenos
Adler number: alpha,136
Translated headword: image-bearing, image-carrying, enshrined as an image
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] carrying in one's mind images or impressions of things that one has thought of. Philo [sc. uses the term] this way.[1]
Greek Original:
Agalmatophoroumenos: agalmata êtoi tupous tôn noêthentôn pherôn en heautôi. houtôs Philôn.
Notes:
Same entry in Photius (Lexicon alpha91 Theodoridis) and elsewhere. The headword is present middle/passive participle, masculine nominative singular, of the verb a)galmatofore/w.
[1] Although the gloss has already defined the headword participle as though it were active, Philo Judaeus [see phi 448, and generally OCD(4) pp.1134-5] uniformly uses it in a passive sense, i.e. "enshrined". Adler and Theodoridis both cite De vita Mosis 1.27; see also De mutatione nominum 21; and cf. De somnis 1.32, De vita Mosis 2.11, 2.209.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; philosophy
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 1999@12:37:13.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keyword; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:28:28.
Jennifer Benedict (title tagging) on 26 March 2008@01:02:38.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 27 March 2008@07:47:26.
David Whitehead (expanded note) on 23 December 2011@04:25:35.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@07:59:24.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:37:39.

Headword: Agamemnôn
Adler number: alpha,140
Translated headword: Agamemnon
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Genitive] *a)game/mnonos and [vocative] w)= *a)ga/memnon.[1] Also [sc. attested is] "Agamemnonian house", and "Agamemnonian ship".[2]
Greek Original:
Agamemnôn: Agamemnonos kai ô Agamemnon. kai Agamemnoneios oikos, kai Agamemnoneia naus.
Notes:
[1] For Agamemnon, son of Atreus, see generally OCD(4) s.v. (pp.34-5).
[2] These two phrases -- neither of them attested outside lexicography -- illustrate the masculine and feminine forms (respectively) of an adjective deriving from the name of Agamemnon.
Keywords: dialects, grammar, and etymology; mythology
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@00:39:03.
Vetted by:
Ross Scaife ✝ (raised vetting status) on 26 September 2000@13:57:58.
David Whitehead (modified translattion and notes; added keyword; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@04:19:50.
David Whitehead (betacoding and other cosmetics) on 23 December 2011@05:14:16.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:38:57.

Headword: Agamêdês
Adler number: alpha,142
Translated headword: Agamedes
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.[1] Also [sc. attested is] a feminine form Agamede.[2]
Greek Original:
Agamêdês: onoma kurion. kai thêlukon Agamêdê.
Notes:
[1] See under epsiloniota 323.
[2] Stephanus of Byzantium lists this as both a toponym and a (connected ) personal name.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; mythology; women
Translated by: William Hutton on 21 August 1998@16:38:34.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headword and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:47:42.
David Whitehead (added note and another keyword) on 15 June 2004@04:26:28.
David Whitehead (another note; more keywords; cosmetic) on 1 August 2011@08:10:21.

Headword: Aganon
Adler number: alpha,145
Translated headword: firewood, broken; good, gentle
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
With proparoxytone accent[1] [this means] wood that has been cut up.
Or brushwood and [wood that is] ready to be cut up.[2]
But some [sc. define it as wood] which is not chopped.
But with the oxytone[3] it means fine. Or good or kindly, though some [say] immortal. Whence also [comes the term] a)ganofrosu/nh ["kindly-mindedness"].
Also [sc. attested is the verb] a)ganou=men ["we will make nice"],[4] meaning we will beautify.
And elsewhere: "however gentle you might pass into the Athenian book of death, you would always have your tresses well-garlanded."[5]
Greek Original:
Aganon: proparoxutonôs to kateagos xulon. ê to phruganôdes kai hetoimon pros to kateagênai. hoi de to apelekêton. Aganon de oxutonôs kalon. ê agathon ê hilaron, hoi de athanaton. enthen kai aganophrosunê. kai Aganoumen, anti tou kosmêsomen. kai authis: hôs an toi rheiêi men aganos Atthidi deltôi kêros, hupo stephanois d' aien echois plokamous.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 146, alpha 147, alpha 148, alpha 149.
[1] i.e. a)/ganos (here neuter).
[2] Addendum lacking in mss ASM.
[3] i.e. a)gano/s (again, here neuter).
[4] Attested only here, but cf. the scholia to Aristophanes, Peace 398 (where a)galou=men occurs).
[5] Greek Anthology 7.36.5 (Erucius), on the tomb of Sophocles; cf. Gow and Page (252-253), alpha 1421, beta 453, and sigma 569.
Reference:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: botany; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; tragedy
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@23:57:06.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@11:07:52.
Jennifer Benedict (tags) on 26 March 2008@01:08:32.
David Whitehead (augmented n.4; more keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 27 March 2008@08:01:50.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@05:41:50.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.5, added bibliography, added cross-references, added keyword) on 25 October 2018@15:42:25.

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