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Headword: Agathoklês
Adler number: alpha,117
Translated headword: Agathokles, Agathocles
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
This man became tyrant [of Syracuse] and, as Timaeus says, in his early youth was a common prostitute, ready [to give himself] to the most debauched, a jackdaw, a buzzard,[1] presenting his backside to all who wanted it. When he died, says [Timaeus], his wife cried out to him in lamentation, "What [did] I not [carnally do to] you? And what [did] you not [reciprocate to] me?"[2] That nature had endowed Agathokles with great advantages is clear. For escaping the wheel, the smoke[of the kiln and] the clay,[3] he came to Syracuse, at about the age of eighteen, and in a short time, starting from such beginnings, he became master of the whole of Sicily, exposed the Carthaginians to extreme dangers, and finally, having grown old in the role of dynast, ended his life with the title of king.[4]
Greek Original:
Agathoklês: houtos egeneto turannos kai, hôs phêsi Timaios, kata tên prôtên hêlikian koinos pornos, hetoimos tois akratestatois, koloios, triorchês, pantôn tôn boulomenôn tois opisthen emprosthen gegonôs. hos hote apethane, tên gunaika phêsi kataklaiomenên auton houtô thrênein: ti d' ouk egô se; ti d' ouk eme su; hoti de ek phuseôs anankê megala proterêmata gegonenai peri ton Agathoklea, touto dêlon. eis gar tas Surakousas paregenêthê pheugôn ton trochon, ton kapnon, ton pêlon, peri te tên hêlikian oktôkaideka etê gegonôs, kai meta tina chronon hormêtheis hupo toiautês hupotheseôs, kurios men egenêthê pasês Sikelias, megistois de kindunois periestêse Karchêdonious, telos engêrasas têi dunasteiai, katestrepse ton bion basileus prosagoreuomenos.
Notes:
360-289 BCE; he ruled Syracuse from 317-289. See generally OCD(4) p.36, under Agathocles(1).
The entry presents a semi-verbatim and mildly abridged extract from Polybius (12.15.2-7: web address 1 below), who is in turn citing, disapprovingly, Timaeus of Tauromenium (FGrH 566 F124b).
[1] On this passage K.J. Dover, Greek Homosexuality (London 1978) p.103 writes: 'The jackdaw here probably sybolises impudence and shamelessness; the buzzard, in Greek triorkhes, having three testicles, presumably symbolises insatiable lust, which is assumed to characterise the true pornos'. Cf. tau 995, where the first part of this quotation reappears.
[2] Probably Theoxene, the daughter or stepdaughter of Ptolemy I Soter and the third wife of Agathokles. See F.W. Walbank, A historical commentary on Polybius (Oxford, 1967) v.2 p.361.
[3] His father owned a large pottery. See Diodorus 19.2.7; 20.63.4. As with equivalent figures in (e.g.) late-C5 Athens, such as Kleon, we see here the conceit that those whose wealth lay in manufacture would actually participate in (and be debased by) the actual manufacturing.
[4] Agathokles assumed the title of king in 305. See Diodorus 20.54.1.
References:
Berve, H., Die Herrschaft des Agathokles (Verlag der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 1953)
Agathokles(15) in RE 1.1 748-757
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; constitution; daily life; ethics; gender and sexuality; historiography; history; politics; trade and manufacture; women; zoology
Translated by: David Whitehead on 10 February 2001@10:07:49.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 6 June 2001@00:10:30.
Tony Natoli (Modified translation, added notes and bibliography, raised status.) on 12 August 2001@02:19:21.
David Whitehead (restorative and other cosmetics) on 17 September 2002@05:10:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 9 October 2005@10:59:41.
David Whitehead (more keywords) on 20 November 2005@10:37:08.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@00:30:36.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 22 December 2011@06:16:09.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:23:59.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 1 January 2015@23:51:52.
Catharine Roth (tweaked link) on 17 February 2018@23:14:40.

Headword: Agathôn agathides
Adler number: alpha,123
Translated headword: skeins of good things
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The proverb is used in the comic poets in reference to a lot of good things.[1]
Also [sc. attested is] 'sea of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] 'anthills of good things', in reference to an abundance of good fortune.[3]
Also [sc. attested is] 'heap of good things', in reference to an abundance of good things and a lot of good fortune.[4]
Greek Original:
Agathôn agathides: tattetai hê paroimia para tois kômikois epi tôn pollôn agathôn. kai Agathôn thalassa, epi plêthous agathôn. kai Agathôn murmêkiai, epi plêthous eudaimonias. kai Agathôn sôros, epi plêthous agathôn kai pollês eudaimonias.
Notes:
The wordplay of the headword phrase a)gaqw=n a)gaqi/des is hard to render in English. 'Bundles of bounties' might do.
[1] (Same material in Photius.) Again at alpha 2601; and see also nu 77 and tau 147.
[2] Again at pi 2049.
[3] Comica adespota fr. 827 Kock, now 796 K.-A.
[4] cf. Apostolius 1.5, etc.
Keywords: comedy; daily life; ethics; imagery; proverbs; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 1 April 2001@00:28:16.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes; minor cosmetics) on 2 April 2001@03:44:41.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 22 December 2006@08:09:36.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 22 December 2011@07:28:42.
David Whitehead (corrected a ref) on 16 March 2012@07:56:43.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 December 2014@04:31:45.
David Whitehead (coding) on 12 July 2015@03:58:05.

Headword: Agamenos
Adler number: alpha,141
Translated headword: admiring, wondering at, marveling at
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone] being amazed at.[1]
"Admiring this man for his high spirits they let him ride on the horse."[2]
Greek Original:
Agamenos: thaumazôn. agamenoi touton tês eupsuchias epochousi tôi hippôi.
Notes:
The headword is present participle, masculine nominative singular, of a)/gamai. Same or similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha99 Theodoridis). The headword is evidently quoted from somewhere (other than the quotation given here, which has the corresponding plural); extant possibilities begin with Xenophon and Plato.
[1] cf. alpha 138.
[2] Theophylact Simocatta, Histories 2.6.4.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history; philosophy; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 28 March 2000@00:49:02.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@10:43:58.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 25 April 2002@04:22:39.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks) on 23 December 2011@05:19:02.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@08:04:58.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; added a keyword) on 4 April 2015@11:40:30.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 4 April 2015@23:28:28.

Headword: Agelarchês
Adler number: alpha,183
Translated headword: herd-leader
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The leader of the herd of oxen.
Greek Original:
Agelarchês: ho tês agelês tôn boôn archôn.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon.
LSJ s.v. (web address 1) shows both this literal meaning and the extended one of any kind of leader.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; imagery; military affairs; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:19:29.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note) on 11 February 2001@09:50:50.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 15 October 2007@01:23:17.
David Whitehead (tweaked note; more keywords) on 15 October 2007@03:11:25.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 26 March 2008@02:02:18.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 29 December 2011@06:36:16.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 29 December 2011@11:39:20.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link, coding) on 5 April 2015@23:22:25.

Headword: Agelaios
Adler number: alpha,187
Translated headword: ordinary
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] no-account fellow [i)diw/ths]. Or the lead animal in the herd.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the genitive plural] "of a)gelai=oi", of no-account fellows, of rustics.
"Such-and-such is likely enough of [= in] ordinary men". Meaning common ones.[2]
Also [sc. attested is] "of a)gelai=oi", of the random masses. It would be used metaphorically from animals in herds or from fish,[3] which they say feed lavishly and in schools [a)gelhdo/n].[4]
Greek Original:
Agelaios: idiôtês. ê ho en agelêi diagôn. kai Agelaiôn, idiôtôn, rhembôdôn. tôn agelaiôn eoiken anthrôpôn einai ho toioutos. anti tou eutelôn. kai Agelaiôn, tôn pollôn kai tuchontôn. eiê d' an ek metaphoras tôn agelaiôn zôiôn ê apo tôn ichthuôn, hous boskesthai rhudên kai agelêdon phasin.
Notes:
The closest comparanda for this entry in its entirety are found in the Platonic Lexicon ascribed to Timaeus (971b.10); Synagoge (Codex B) alpha99; Photius, Lexicon alpha134 and alpha141 Theodoridis; none of these matches up precisely, however. Snippets evidently from the same source appear elsewhere, as noted below.
[1] For the distinction see already alpha 186. Thus far the entry = Synagoge alpha49; cf. Aelius Dionysius alpha17; Eudemus 3.20; Hesychius alpha424, omicron3.
[2] Julian, Oration 7 (205D), where "such-and-such" = the invention of myth. The glosses (minus the quotation) in this and the previous sentence are paralleled in Etymologicum Gudianum 4.3 and Etymologicum Magnum 7.41.
[3] cf. alpha 189.
[4] The reference is probably to Herodotus 2.93.1, where both i)xqu/es a)gelai=oi and the adverb a)gelhdo/n (alpha 191) appear (see web address 1). This etymological information also appears in Harpokration alpha8 Keaney (4.13 Dindorf) as well as in some of the sources cited above.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; imagery; rhetoric; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 23 June 1999@13:23:22.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@09:44:27.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 18 October 2005@05:38:36.
Catharine Roth (betacode typos) on 12 October 2007@01:13:40.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation, added betacode, augmented note, raised status) on 12 October 2007@19:46:19.
Catharine Roth (added link) on 12 October 2007@22:34:25.
William Hutton (Augmented and modified notes) on 12 November 2007@06:25:26.
William Hutton (cosmetics) on 5 August 2009@13:42:54.
David Whitehead (more keywords; cosmetics) on 29 December 2011@06:55:10.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 29 December 2011@11:48:32.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:16:07.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@23:37:00.

Headword: Agelaiôn
Adler number: alpha,188
Translated headword: pasture
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] the herd's place.
Greek Original:
Agelaiôn: ho topos tês agelês.
Note:
This noun is attested only in lexicography (besides here, in ps.-Zonaras and, according to Adler, the Ambrosian Lexicon), but cf. generally alpha 183, alpha 186, alpha 187, etc.
Keywords: agriculture; definition; geography; zoology
Translated by: Gregory Hays on 4 June 1999@15:21:21.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note) on 25 April 2002@09:49:13.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keywords, raised status) on 12 October 2007@01:00:34.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:17:58.
David Whitehead (my typo) on 5 April 2015@10:26:30.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:26:17.

Headword: Agelêtês bous
Adler number: alpha,192
Translated headword: herding ox
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] one from a herd.
Greek Original:
Agelêtês bous: ho ex agelês.
Note:
Same glossing in ps.-Zonaras and, according to Adler, the Ambrosian Lexicon. The headword phrase, possibly a quotation, is otherwise unattested.
Keywords: definition; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 10 April 2000@23:33:09.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 11 February 2001@10:28:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 12 October 2007@01:05:41.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:22:33.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:31:09.

Headword: Agelêphin
Adler number: alpha,193
Translated headword: in a herd
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] from/out of the herd.
Greek Original:
Agelêphin: ek tês agelês.
Note:
The gloss reflects the context of this adverb at its first attested appearance, in Homer, Iliad 2.480-1: a bull in a herd of cattle stands out from it (web address 1). Similar glosses appear in a scholion on this verse, as well as in Hesychius (alpha438) and, according to Adler, the Ambrosian Lexicon.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; imagery; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 10 April 2000@23:54:35.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added note and keywords) on 11 February 2001@10:36:49.
Catharine Roth (augmented note) on 12 October 2007@01:02:51.
Catharine Roth on 12 October 2007@01:03:21.
Catharine Roth (added link and keyword) on 12 October 2007@01:17:02.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@06:24:25.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 5 April 2015@10:30:27.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 April 2015@23:32:16.

Headword: Agerôchia
Adler number: alpha,202
Translated headword: haughtiness, manliness, nobility
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Arrogance.[1]
"The Scythians are supercilious and exceedingly haughty."[2]
By virtue of being exceedingly boastful or by virtue of being exceedingly honored.[3]
Also [sc. attested is] a)ge/rwxos, [meaning] honorable, manly.[4]
Agathias [writes]: "mounting a horse who was very obedient to the rein and noble, and not the sort to leap and prance in uncontrolled fashion."[5]
And elsewhere: "how he might be reputable and honorable to those who came later."[6]
Or a)ge/rwxos, [meaning] the boastful person.[7]
Greek Original:
Agerôchia: huperêphania. hoti hoi Skuthai eisin huperoptikoi kai lian agerôchoi. para to agan auchein ê para to agan gerouchein. Agerôchos, entimos, andreios. Agathias: hippou epibas euêniôtatou te kai agerôchou kai hoiou ouk atakta exallesthai kai skirtan. kai authis: hôs an esoito eukleês tois metepeita kai agerôchos. ê Agerôchos, ho alazôn.
Notes:
The ambiguity of this concept, which the entry illustrates, is also noted in LSJ.
[1] Same glossing in Photius and other lexica.
[2] Quotation unidentifiable.
[3] Either way, an etymological gloss (paralleled in Etymologicum Magnum 7.47) on the adjective cognate with the headword; it assumes a link with the adverb a)/gan.
[4] Same or similar glossing in other lexica.
[5] Agathias, Histories 1.21.
[6] Quotation unidentifiable.
[7] Same glossing, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon.
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; geography; historiography; history; zoology
Translated by: William Hutton on 17 October 2000@10:07:47.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 25 April 2002@10:27:02.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 30 December 2011@07:20:45.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 30 December 2011@16:59:45.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 10 July 2015@23:14:41.

Headword: Hagizôn
Adler number: alpha,235
Translated headword: sanctifying
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning one who is] making a sacrifice. "Come, making a cattle sacrifice at the hearth."[1]
Also [sc. attested is the related participle] a(giasqe/ntwn, [meaning] rites having been performed.[2]
Also [sc. attested is the form] a(gia/zw, [used] with an accusative.[3]
Greek Original:
Hagizôn: hagiazôn. bouthuton hestian hagizôn hikou. kai Hagiasthentôn, aphierôthentôn. kai Hagiazô, aitiatikêi.
Notes:
The headword, extracted from the quotation given, is present participle, masculine nominative singular, of a(gi/zw; LSJ entry at web address 1.
[1] Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus 1495 (web address 2), with scholion.
[2] So too in other lexica. This aorist passive participle in the masculine/neuter genitive plural is evidently quoted from somewhere.
[3] cf. alpha 232, alpha 233, alpha 240.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; poetry; religion; tragedy; zoology
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@14:14:16.
Vetted by:
Anne Mahoney on 25 June 2000@10:55:39.
Catharine Roth (Added headword translation, link, keywords.) on 18 February 2001@19:47:49.
Catharine Roth (Added cross-reference.) on 18 February 2001@19:50:11.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 26 April 2002@06:16:17.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 23 July 2003@06:49:18.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@04:21:14.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@07:44:51.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@07:17:33.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 22 November 2020@00:36:15.

Headword: Ankesi
Adler number: alpha,245
Translated headword: [in] forests
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning in] tree-filled and wooded places.[1]
In the Epigrams: "with this he slays wild beasts in beast-breeding forests".[2]
Greek Original:
Ankesi: sundendrois kai hulôdesi topois. en Epigrammasi: thêrobolei toutôi d' ankesi thêrotokois.
Notes:
The headword is dative plural of alpha 248. It is perhaps extracted from the quotation given, though not demonstrably so; there are other extant possibilities in e.g. Theocritus and Oppian.
[1] For this glossing cf. the scholia to Homer, Iliad 18.321, where a)/gke' occurs.
[2] Greek Anthology 6.186.4 (Diocles), dedications to Pan by three brothers; cf. Gow and Page (230-231).
Reference:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
Keywords: botany; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry; religion; zoology
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@14:04:48.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headword, notes, keywords; cosmetics) on 12 February 2001@04:42:05.
Catharine Roth (Added cross-reference.) on 4 March 2001@22:35:12.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; tweaks and cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@05:13:03.
David Whitehead (expanded note; cosmetics) on 9 April 2015@07:42:49.
David Whitehead (coding) on 7 July 2015@02:50:08.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.2, added bibliography, added keyword) on 2 November 2018@18:01:43.

Headword: Ankratos elaunonta
Adler number: alpha,250
Translated headword: riding hard
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Xenophon [has this] in place of 'riding fast'.[1]
Greek Original:
Ankratos elaunonta: Xenophôn, anti tou panu elaunonta.
Notes:
Same or similar entry in other lexica (references at Photius alpha184 Theodoridis); and see again at alpha 2543.
[1] Xenophon, Art of Horsemanship 8.10, a)na\ kra/tos e)lau/nonta. See also Anabasis 1.8.1, e)lau/nwn a)na\ kra/tos.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; history; military affairs; zoology
Translated by: Nathan Greenberg ✝ on 24 November 1998@13:53:54.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (added headword; modified translation; augmented note; cosmetics) on 9 October 2000@07:33:05.
David Whitehead (augmented note; added keywords; cosmetics) on 9 March 2001@09:49:44.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 4 January 2012@05:40:03.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:01:45.

Headword: Ankulocheilês kai Ankulocheilos
Adler number: alpha,255
Translated headword: crooked-beaked
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Bent-beaked, an epithet of the eagle, which has curved talons.[1] But in reference to Cleon [it means] having crooked hands for theft and seizure.
Greek Original:
Ankulocheilês kai Ankulocheilos: skoliocheilos, epitheton tou aetou, epikampeis tas chêlas echôn. epi de Kleônos, ankulas tas cheiras echôn pros to kleptein kai harpazein.
Notes:
The headword actually presents two words (related to chi 225) that differ only in having different adjectival endings: a)gkuloxei/lhs and a)gkulo/xeilos; LSJ only documents the existence of the former.
[1] From the scholia to Aristophanes, Knights 197 (web address 1 below), where an adjective variously transmitted as a)gkuloxei/lhs or a)gkuloxh/lhs ('crooked clawed', from chi 276) is applied to Cleon (kappa 1731). The latter is what modern editors rightly print, but note that in late Greek the two words would have been homophones. See LSJ at a)gkuloxh/lhs (web address 2).
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: biography; comedy; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; economics; ethics; imagery; medicine; politics; zoology
Translated by: Roger Travis on 4 October 2000@11:53:19.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, augmented notes and added links, added keywords, set status) on 15 June 2001@09:32:39.
David Whitehead (added x-ref; restorative cosmetics) on 10 February 2003@09:16:21.
David Whitehead (tweaked notes; more keywords; cosmetics) on 1 June 2009@04:19:34.
David Whitehead (more keywords; tweaks) on 4 January 2012@08:56:26.

Headword: Aglôttia
Adler number: alpha,271
Translated headword: tonguelessness
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] quiet, silence.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the related adjective] tongueless, [meaning] voiceless, speechless.
"Now having fallen to the earth, tongueless and voiceless, I lie, refusing emulous ambition."[2]
Greek Original:
Aglôttia: hêsuchia, siôpê. kai Aglôssos, ho anaudos, ho aphônos. nun eis gan aglôssos, anaudêtos te pesousa, keimai, mimêtên zêlon anênamenê.
Notes:
LSJ entry at web address 1.
[1] Same glossing in other lexica; references at Photius alpha202 Theodoridis.
[2] Greek Anthology 7.191.5-6 (Archias), epitaph for a jay; cf. Gow and Page (412-413); more fully at alpha 2757, cf. alpha 2742 and kappa 1422. For other applications of the adjective, including the literal (Aristotle on the crocodile), see LSJ s.v. (web address 2).
Reference:
A.S.F. Gow and D.L. Page, eds., The Greek Anthology: The Garland of Philip and Some Contemporary Epigrams, vol. I, (Cambridge, 1968)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; medicine; poetry; zoology
Translated by: Roger Travis on 6 October 2000@12:53:45.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, set status) on 18 June 2001@01:53:38.
David Whitehead (augmented note; cosmetics) on 18 June 2001@03:12:08.
David Whitehead on 18 June 2001@03:13:41.
Catharine Roth (added links) on 19 June 2001@21:31:08.
Catharine Roth (restored punctuation) on 12 February 2007@14:11:59.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; raised status) on 13 February 2007@03:07:33.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 5 January 2012@04:52:54.
David Whitehead on 18 August 2013@08:17:33.
Ronald Allen (expanded n.2, added bibliography, added cross-references) on 5 November 2018@20:48:25.

Headword: Agnos
Adler number: alpha,279

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