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Headword: Aaptos
Adler number: alpha,5
Translated headword: irresistable, invulnerable
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unharmed.
Herodianus[1] says about a)/aptos that it comes from i)a/ptw ['I harm'], and after adding alpha-privative and dropping the 'i' [it becomes] a)/aptos, "whom no one can harm." Or perhaps the 'a' is not to be taken as negative but as intensifying, so it would be "one who has great power to harm." Thus the first has a passive sense, the second an active. With the negative prefix it also means "one who is untouched."[2]
Greek Original:
Aaptos: ablabês. Hêrôdianos phêsi peri tou aaptos, hoti gignetai apo tou iaptô to blaptô, kai meta tou sterêtikou a kai kat' elleipsin tou i aaptos, hon oudeis dunatai blapsai. ê ouchi kata sterêsin eklêpteon to a, alla kat' epitasin, hin' êi ho megala dunamenos blaptein. hôste to men prôton dêloi pathos, to de deuteron energeian. legetai de kai aaptos kata sterêsin ho apsaustos.
Notes:
This form of the headword, the nominative singular masculine/feminine, is unattested outside lexicography; however, plural forms occur frequently in hexameter poetry, in the formula xei=res a)/aptoi or xei=ras a)a/ptous (usually interpreted as 'irresistable hands'); e.g. Homer, Iliad 8.450 (web address 1).
[1] The etymological comments that follow occur only in mss G (= Parisinus 2623) and T (= Vaticanus 881); cf. Herodianus 3.2.30.
[2] This etymology, alpha-privative + a(/ptomai ('touch'), is the one most commonly accepted nowadays. See LSJ s.v. (web address 2) and Schwyzer, DGE. Yet there is reason for doubt, and the correct Homeric form (attested already by Aristophanes of Byzantium) may actually be a)ept-. See Chantraine s.v. a)/aptos.
Reference:
P. Chantraine, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque, ed. 2 Paris 2009.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; poetry
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:48:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status; cosmetics) on 16 October 2000@15:10:37.
David Whitehead (added keyword; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@07:40:44.
David Whitehead (betacoding and other cosmetics) on 9 November 2005@09:16:30.
William Hutton (Augmented notes, cosmetics, added keywords and links, set status) on 19 August 2007@18:31:56.
William Hutton (typo) on 20 August 2007@04:20:04.
William Hutton (augmented notes, tweaked headwords) on 20 August 2007@08:59:16.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics, consistency) on 25 March 2008@00:11:12.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 16 December 2011@23:59:48.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:14:21.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; note typo) on 2 April 2015@08:36:40.
Catharine Roth (added bibliography) on 25 January 2024@00:59:21.

Headword: Aasamên
Adler number: alpha,7
Translated headword: I was addled
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] I did wrong, I slipped up;[1] I was damaged,[2] in the sense of "I was overcome by folly."
Greek Original:
Aasamên: hêmarton, esphalên: eblabên, hoion atêi periepeson.
Notes:
The headword is the first person singular, aorist indicative middle/passive, of a)a/w (LSJ entry at web address 1). It is found frequently in epic poetry, e.g. Homer Iliad 9.116 (web address 2).
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge (Codex B) alpha3 (Lexica Segueriana 3.8 Bachmann).
[2] From here on the entry is very similar to Apollonius Sophistes, Homeric Lexicon 1.19, and Hesychius alpha25.
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; epic; ethics; poetry; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@16:50:10.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Raised status, minor alterations to translation) on 17 October 2000@17:21:27.
William Hutton on 17 October 2000@17:22:15.
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@04:43:19.
William Hutton (modified translation, augmented notes, added links and keywords, set status) on 20 August 2007@04:52:46.
William Hutton (updated footnote) on 8 November 2007@06:02:11.
Jennifer Benedict (betacode typo) on 22 March 2008@17:15:55.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:13:03.
William Hutton on 22 July 2009@15:25:18.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 17 December 2011@00:09:02.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:06:47.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 3 September 2014@10:30:04.

Headword: Abaxi
Adler number: alpha,16
Translated headword: [in/on/with] planks, abacuses
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
What we call a)ba/kia.[1] The Lawmaker [says] in the Martyrdom of Saint Thecla: "Tryphaina was overcome by suffering, and was seen lying like the dead on the slabs."[2] So he says.
Greek Original:
Abaxi: tois par' hêmin legomenois abakiois. ho Logothetês en tôi tês hagias Theklês marturiôi: Truphaina de pathei lêphtheisa nekrois homoia pros tois abaxin hôrato keimenê. houtô phêsin.
Notes:
This entry occurs after alpha 17 in ms A (= Parisinus 2625), after alpha 9 in ms S (= Vaticanus 1296) and in the margin of ms D (Bodleianus Auct. V 52).
[1] The given form is a dative plural of a)/bac, ("abacus"), and the lexicographer explains it by reference to the diminutive a)ba/kion. The primary sense is a table topped by a slab, or the slab itself; a "calculator" is a secondary meaning.
[2] Symeon Metaphrastes (also known as the Logothete ('Lawmaker')) Patrologia Graeca 115.837c. On Thecla, see theta 102.
Keywords: biography; Christianity; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; history; mathematics; religion; science and technology; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:53:59.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation and notes, added keywords, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:46:37.
Catharine Roth (modified translation, augmented note) on 7 November 2002@15:06:33.
Catharine Roth (cosmetics) on 7 November 2002@15:08:44.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 9 November 2005@09:20:27.
Catharine Roth (added keyword) on 6 September 2006@23:44:05.
William Hutton (modified headword and translation, augmented notes, set status) on 24 August 2007@09:36:45.
William Hutton on 24 August 2007@09:42:51.
Jennifer Benedict (tweaks) on 24 March 2008@23:50:31.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 18 December 2011@10:35:22.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 7 February 2015@23:44:46.
Catharine Roth (tweaked headword translation) on 17 February 2024@00:53:18.
Catharine Roth (changed cross-reference) on 17 February 2024@14:04:15.

Headword: Abaptos
Adler number: alpha,17
Translated headword: untempered
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] most/very unsharpened.[1]
Also [sc. attested is the superlative] a)bapto/tatos.[2]
Greek Original:
Abaptos: astomôtatos. kai Abaptotatos.
Notes:
The headword is unattested outside lexicography.
[1] Similar glossing in other lexica (references at Photius alpha28 Theodoridis), except that the original form of the gloss, in Cyril, seems simply to be a)sto/mwtos ('unsharpened'), not this superlative of a different but potentially synonymous adjective a)/stomos. Cyril's reading has been adopted in Latte's text of Hesychius and Theodoridis' of Photius.
[2] Only in ms A (= Parisinus 2625). This superlative form of the headword is attested only here.
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; science and technology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:54:56.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, modified note, raised status) on 18 January 2001@09:59:20.
David Whitehead (another note; betacoding and other cosmetics) on 9 November 2005@09:22:26.
William Hutton (augmented notes, set status) on 24 August 2007@04:43:34.
William Hutton (tweaks) on 24 August 2007@04:54:57.
William Hutton (betacode fix) on 30 August 2007@04:50:05.
William Hutton (modified note) on 8 November 2007@06:44:00.
Jennifer Benedict (ms. cosmeticule) on 24 March 2008@23:52:13.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 18 December 2011@10:37:33.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:28:44.

Headword: Abaris
Adler number: alpha,18
Translated headword: Abaris, Avars
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Scythian, son of Seuthes. He wrote the so-called Scythinian Oracles[1] and Marriage of the river Hebros and Purifications and a Theogony in prose and Arrival of Apollo among the Hyperboreans in meter. He came from Scythia to Greece.
The legendary arrow belongs to him, the one he flew on from Greece to Hyperborean Scythia. It was given to him by Apollo.[2]
Gregory the Theologian mentioned this man in his Epitaphios for Basil the Great.[3]
They say[4] that once, when there was a plague throughout the entire inhabited world, Apollo told the Greeks and barbarians who had come to consult his oracle that the Athenian people should make prayers on behalf of all of them. So, many peoples sent ambassadors to them, and Abaris, they say, came as ambassador of the Hyperboreans in the third Olympiad.[5]
[Note] that the Bulgarians thoroughly destroyed the Avars[6] by force.
[Note] that these Avars drove out the Sabinorians, when they themselves had been expelled by peoples living near the shore of the Ocean, who left their own land when a mist formed in the flood of the Ocean and a crowd of griffins appeared; the story was that they would not stop until they had devoured the race of men. So the people driven away by these monsters invaded their neighbors. As the invaders were stronger, the others submitted and left, just as the Saragurians, when they were driven out, went to the Akatziri Huns.[7]
The declension is Abaris, Abaridos [genitive singular], Abaridas [accusative plural], and with apocope Abaris [also accusative plural, with a long iota].
See about these things under 'Bulgarians'.[8]
Greek Original:
Abaris: Skuthês, Seuthou huios. sunegrapsato de chrêsmous tous kaloumenous Skuthinous kai Gamon Hebrou tou potamou kai Katharmous kai Theogonian katalogadên kai Apollônos aphixin eis Huperboreous emmetrôs. hêke de ek Skuthôn eis Hellada. toutou ho muthologoumenos oïstos, tou petomenou apo tês Hellados mechri tôn Huperboreôn Skuthôn: edothê de autôi para tou Apollônos. toutou kai Grêgorios ho Theologos en tôi eis ton megan Basileion Epitaphiôi mnêmên pepoiêtai. phasi de hoti loimou kata pasan tên oikoumenên gegonotos aneilen ho Apollôn manteuomenois Hellêsi kai barbarois ton Athênaiôn dêmon huper pantôn euchas poiêsasthai. presbeuomenôn de pollôn ethnôn pros autous, kai Abarin ex Huperboreôn presbeutên aphikesthai legousi kata tên g# Olumpiada. hoti tous Abaris hoi Boulgaroi kata kratos ardên êphanisan. hoti hoi Abaris houtoi exêlasan Sabinôras, metanastai genomenoi hupo ethnôn oikountôn men tên parôkeanitin aktên, tên de chôran apolipontôn dia to ex anachuseôs tou Ôkeanou homichlôdes ginomenon, kai grupôn de plêthos anaphanen: hoper ên logos mê proteron pausasthai prin ê boran poiêsai to tôn anthrôpôn genos. dio dê hupo tônde elaunomenoi tôn deinôn tois plêsiochôrois eneballon: kai tôn epiontôn dunatôterôn ontôn hoi tên ephodon huphistamenoi metanistanto, hôsper kai hoi Saragouroi elathentes pros tois Akatirois Ounnois egenonto. klinetai de Abaris, Abaridos, tous Abaridas, kai kata apokopên Abaris. zêtei peri tôn autôn en tôi Boulgaroi.
Notes:
See generally A.H. Griffiths in OCD(4) p.1: "legendary devotee of Apollo from the far north, a shamanistic missionary and saviour-figure like Aristeas [alpha 3900]". Adler credits this part of the entry to the Epitome Onomatologi Hesychii Milesii.
[1] Or in one manuscript, 'Skythian'.
[2] Perhaps from a scholion on the passage about to be cited (so Adler). Cf. Herodotos 4.36.1 (web address 1).
[3] Gregory of Nazianzus PG 36.524b.
[4] This material is from Harpokration s.v. *)/abaris
[5] 768-765 BCE. Harpokration (see preceding note) cites Hippostratos (FGrH 568 F4) to this effect, but adds that there were later alternatives: the twenty-first Olympiad (696-693) or "the time of Croesus, king of Lydia" (so Pindar, fr.270 Snell-Maehler), i.e. c.560-546.
[6] The word used for the Avars here, *)aba/ris, is a homograph for the name of the Hyperborean wise man Abaris, so this separate section on the Avars is included in this entry. There is no indication that the lexicographer sees any connection between the two topics.
[7] Priscus fr.30 FHG (4.104), still 30 Bornmann. The final part reappears at alpha 820 and sigma 111.
[8] beta 423.
References:
RE Abaris (1) I.16-17
Macartney, C.A. "On the Greek Sources for the History of the Turks in the Sixth Century." BSOAS 11 (1944): 266-275
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: biography; Christianity; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; historiography; history; mythology; philosophy; poetry; religion; rhetoric
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 21 August 1998@17:03:41.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation and notes, added keywords, set status.) on 19 January 2001@14:57:43.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and bibliography; cosmetics) on 9 February 2001@05:20:43.
David Whitehead (added note) on 14 February 2001@06:09:48.
Mihai Olteanu (The only thracian item concerning Abaris is his father's name. Everything else pledes for his sythian ('hyperborean') origin. This is why I suppose we deal here with a copist mistake, and I propose the emendation: ́Αβαρις: Σκύθης, *Σκύθου υἱός (for Σκύθης as mythological character, see for example Herodotos 4,10).) on 22 January 2002@21:55:20.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords; cosmetics) on 23 January 2002@03:11:25.
David Whitehead (augmented n.6 and added a keyword) on 5 October 2004@03:21:13.
William Hutton (augmented notes, added link and keywords, set status) on 24 August 2007@11:05:00.
Jennifer Benedict (cosmeticule) on 25 March 2008@00:16:43.
David Whitehead (another note; cosmetics) on 28 March 2014@06:23:27.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:06:21.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 31 January 2015@09:22:24.
Catharine Roth (tweaked translation) on 18 February 2024@01:49:17.

Headword: Abarnis
Adler number: alpha,19
Translated headword: Abarnis
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Name of a city.
Greek Original:
Abarnis: onoma poleôs.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (74), and cf. more generally the scholia to Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1.932 (where the genitive case occurs), on which see further below.
Abarnis lay on the southern shore of the Propontis (Sea of Marmara), between Parion and Lampsakos; Barrington Atlas map 51 grid H4. According to Stephanus of Byzantium s.v. *)/abarnos (sic), Abarnos and Aparnis were also attested versions of its name.
A scholium to Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1.932 (repeated in more legible form in Etymologicum Magnum 2.11-28) provides an etymological explanation of the origin of the name in Aphrodite's refusal (a)parnh/sasqai) to recognize her offspring Priapos, who was born in the region.
Keywords: children; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; gender and sexuality; geography; mythology; religion; women
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:55:54.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified note) on 19 September 2000@03:59:17.
William Hutton (augmented note, added keywords, set status) on 24 August 2007@23:38:41.
David Whitehead (augmented and re-arranged note) on 19 December 2011@06:02:32.
Catharine Roth (coding, typo) on 5 August 2013@00:18:42.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 10 January 2015@22:46:51.

Headword: Abasanistos
Adler number: alpha,21
Translated headword: untested
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning someone/something] unexercised or unexamined, unscrutinized. The word comes from the test of the goldsmith's stone, on which they scrutinize gold.[1] Aelian in his On Providence used the word 'untested' to mean 'without pain'.[2]
Greek Original:
Abasanistos: agumnastos ê anexetastos, adokimastos. eirêtai de apo tês basanou tês chrusochoïkês lithou, en hêi dokimazousi to chrusion. echrêsato de Ailianos en tôi peri pronoias tôi abasanistos anti tou aneu odunês.
Notes:
= Synagoge alpha4 (Lexica Segueriana 3.14); Photius, Lexicon alpha30 Theodoridis; perhaps ultimately derived in part from Phrynichus (Praeparatio rhetorica fr. 39 de Borries); cf. Hesychius alpha89 and a cluster of related entries: alpha 2276, Hesychius alpha4899, Synagoge alpha589, Photius alpha1845.
[1] *ba/sanos can mean both the touchstone itself and the testing process. See beta 139, and cf. beta 137.
[2] Aelian fr.9 Hercher (= 9 Domingo-Forasté). The version of the entry at Synagoge alpha4 includes the information that this is from the third book of the work in question.
Keywords: athletics; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; imagery; law; philosophy; rhetoric; science and technology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 22 August 1998@12:58:18.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, cosmetics, added keywords, set status) on 20 January 2001@11:28:32.
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented notes) on 21 January 2001@05:35:01.
William Hutton (tweaked translation, expanded notes, added keywords, set status) on 27 August 2007@05:12:39.
William Hutton (Updates references in footnotes.) on 11 November 2007@07:10:05.
William Hutton (typo) on 8 February 2008@02:59:18.
Jennifer Benedict (added keyword) on 23 March 2008@00:55:08.
David Whitehead (typos) on 19 December 2011@06:11:54.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:31:43.
David Whitehead (cosmetics; another keyword) on 2 April 2015@08:51:56.
Catharine Roth (cosmeticule) on 18 February 2024@01:52:52.

Headword: Abaton
Adler number: alpha,23
Translated headword: inaccessible
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning something] sacred, unapproachable, desolate;[1] also an 'inaccessible' road, [meaning] impassable.
Greek Original:
Abaton: hieron, aprositon, erêmon: kai hodos abatos, hê aporeutos.
Notes:
The headword is the neuter singular form of this adjective, which, as a substantive, can be used for the adyton of a temple or shrine.
[1] Up to this point the entry = Synagoge alpha5, and Photius, Lexicon alpha31 Theodoridis; cf. Hesychius alpha91 (where Latte confidently asserts that the headword is quoted from Euripides, Bacchae 10).
Keywords: architecture; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography; religion; tragedy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:21:29.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword and translation, set keywords and status) on 20 January 2001@11:38:48.
David Whitehead (modified translation; added a keyword; typo and other cosmetics) on 13 April 2004@09:31:34.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added keyword, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:18:41.
Catharine Roth (deleted keyword) on 3 October 2007@19:29:24.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 4 October 2007@03:40:05.
William Hutton (Modifed and updated notes.) on 11 November 2007@07:16:09.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@06:14:37.
David Whitehead (expanded n.1; another keyword) on 1 February 2012@03:58:10.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 5 August 2013@00:52:27.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:33:19.
William Hutton (typo) on 21 August 2013@10:06:07.

Headword: Abdêra
Adler number: alpha,26
Translated headword: Abdera
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The sea, and a name of a city[1] and 'Abderite' [is] the citizen [of it].[2]
Also Phalera and Kythera [sc. are spelled with eta]; but Gadeira, Stageira, Topeira, and Dobeira [sc. are spelled with epsiloniota].[3]
Greek Original:
Abdêra: hê thalassa, kai onoma poleôs kai Abdêritês ho politês. kai Phalêra kai Kuthêra. Gadeira de kai Stageira kai Topeira kai Dobeira.
Notes:
[1] Actually, as Stephanus of Byzantium and others noted, there were two cities called Abdera: one, the present-day Avdira, in northern Greece (Barrington Atlas map 51 grid D3; RE I.22-23; OCD(4) s.v.); the other, the present-day Adra, in southern Spain (Barrington Atlas map 27 grid B5). But the idea of Abdera as 'the sea' is unintelligible.
[2] Similarly glossed in the Etymologicum Magnum and the Lexicon Ambrosianum. An "Abderite" could also signify someone generically stupid: see LSJ s.v. *)abdhri/ths (web address 1 below).
[3] These six city-names (whether spelled with an eta, like Abdera, or epsilon-iota; there would have been little difference in pronounciation by the time of the Suda) generate an ethnikon in the same way. See also delta 1318, sigma 977. This part of the entry, Adler reports, is lacking in mss A (= Parisinus 2625), G (= Parisinus 2623), and T (= Vaticanus 881).
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; geography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:24:49.
Vetted by:
Catharine Roth (Added note.) on 30 July 2000@22:42:39.
David Whitehead (modified translation and notes) on 18 September 2000@05:28:33.
William Hutton (Cosmetics) on 20 January 2001@23:00:39.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, added cross-reference, raised status) on 3 October 2007@19:38:55.
Catharine Roth (punctuation) on 4 October 2007@10:32:59.
David Whitehead (augmented n.1 (and corrected note numbering)) on 5 October 2007@03:15:34.
Jennifer Benedict (added link, cosmetics) on 25 March 2008@00:58:26.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@06:31:43.
Catharine Roth (betacode cosmetics) on 20 December 2011@15:48:25.
David Whitehead (another x-ref) on 17 January 2014@03:47:11.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:08:37.
Catharine Roth (coding, tweaked link) on 30 March 2022@17:58:35.

Headword: Abelterokokkux
Adler number: alpha,31
Translated headword: silly cuckoo
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
The vacuous and silly man.[1]
Greek Original:
Abelterokokkux: ho kenos kai abelteros.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 32, alpha 33.
[1] Plato Comicus fr. 64 Kock = 65 K.-A. (Phrynichus 48.11). For "cuckoo" alone, in this sense, see e.g. Aristophanes, Acharnians 598 (web address 1 below), and Hesychius s.v. ko/kkuges.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: comedy; definition; ethics; imagery; zoology
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 23 August 1998@16:28:01.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Cosmetics, keywords, raised status) on 24 January 2001@22:19:23.
David Whitehead (modified translation and note) on 25 January 2001@03:48:12.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 8 October 2007@00:27:35.
Jennifer Benedict (typo) on 23 March 2008@01:09:06.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 25 March 2008@01:04:18.
David Whitehead (x-refs; more keywords;) on 19 December 2011@06:48:41.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:23:30.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:55.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 1 January 2015@08:53:56.

Headword: Abelterôtatoi
Adler number: alpha,33
Translated headword: most thoughtless, very thoughtless
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Aristophanes [writes]: "before this most/very thoughtless men used to sit gaping -- Dolts, Half-wits".[1]
Greek Original:
Abelterôtatoi: Aristophanês: teôs d' abelterôtatoi kechênotes Mammakuthoi Melitidai kathêntai.
Notes:
(Entry lacking, Adler reports, in ms S.)
Masculine nominative plural of this superlative, evidently from the quotation given. See also alpha 31, alpha 32.
[1] Aristophanes, Frogs 989-991 (web address 1), quoted also at beta 468 and mu 121. The other two terms used here (each of them apparently stemming from a proper name) stand at least as much in need of glossing as does this adjective: see Dover (below) 315-16. For the formation of the adjective, see also the entry in LSJ s.v. (web address 2 below).
Reference:
Aristophanes, Frogs, edited with introduction and commentary by K.J. Dover (Oxford 1993)
Associated internet addresses:
Web address 1,
Web address 2
Keywords: comedy; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 25 August 1998@19:03:23.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified translation; augmented note; added bibliography; cosmetics) on 11 January 2001@08:29:41.
Catharine Roth (Added link.) on 11 January 2001@12:49:46.
William Hutton on 2 February 2001@11:46:00.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 23 March 2008@14:05:57.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 24 March 2008@05:10:07.
Catharine Roth on 13 April 2009@13:11:48.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 16 December 2011@05:29:53.
Catharine Roth (upgraded link) on 7 August 2013@23:25:45.
Catharine Roth on 7 August 2013@23:26:24.
David Whitehead (another note) on 28 March 2014@06:25:35.
David Whitehead (another keyword) on 2 April 2015@09:16:57.

Headword: Abêrôthaios
Adler number: alpha,37
Translated headword: Aberothaios, Aberothaeus
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
Abêrôthaios: onoma kurion.
Note:
Attested only here and, according to Adler, the Ambrosian Lexicon (10). A place-name Gaberoth-chamaam (of which this could perhaps be a corruption) occurs in Jeremiah 48.17.
Keyword: definition
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@18:51:12.
Vetted by:
William Hutton on 26 January 2001@23:15:47.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 27 February 2003@08:31:36.
Catharine Roth (raised status) on 7 November 2003@11:36:11.
David Whitehead (tweaked note) on 19 July 2011@08:00:31.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 12 September 2015@19:02:03.
Catharine Roth (expanded note) on 10 March 2024@23:03:27.

Headword: Abiadênos
Adler number: alpha,40
Translated headword: Abiadenian
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
From the city Abiadene.
Greek Original:
Abiadênos: apo poleôs Abiadênês.
Notes:
No such city is attested, so surely the name in question here is Adiabene (see alpha 470, and generally OCD(4) p.12), even though that is consistently classified as a "territory" (in present-day Iraq) rather than a "city".
This entry occurs only here and in the derivative ps.-Zonaras.
Keywords: definition; geography
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@18:53:03.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, cosmetics, set status) on 26 January 2001@23:20:36.
David Whitehead (added note) on 9 February 2001@06:01:49.
Catharine Roth (augmented note, raised status) on 9 October 2007@13:07:20.
David Whitehead (cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@07:05:59.
David Whitehead (updated a ref) on 29 July 2014@12:10:51.

Headword: Abiezer
Adler number: alpha,44
Translated headword: Abiezer
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
Abiezer: onoma kurion.
Notes:
Same entry, according to Adler, in the Ambrosian Lexicon (15).
For A., ancestor of Gideon, see Judges 6:34, 8:2, etc.
Keywords: biography; definition; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@18:57:51.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, keyword, set status) on 27 January 2001@11:45:30.
David Whitehead (added note and keyword) on 27 February 2003@08:41:51.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@07:14:38.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 7 August 2013@23:41:01.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 17 June 2023@19:55:59.

Headword: Abioud
Adler number: alpha,48
Translated headword: Abioud, Abihud
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
Proper name.
Greek Original:
Abioud: onoma kurion.
Notes:
Exodus 6:23 (etc.): a son of Aaron.
cf. the genealogy of Christ at Matthew 1:13 (son of Zorobabel, father of Eliakim).
Keywords: biography; Christianity; definition; religion
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:00:24.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Added headword, set status) on 28 January 2001@20:47:42.
William Hutton (Added note and keyword) on 29 January 2001@19:34:27.
David Whitehead (added keywords; cosmetics) on 27 February 2003@08:44:09.
Catharine Roth (cosmetic, keyword) on 17 November 2009@18:43:35.
David Whitehead (expanded notes) on 19 December 2011@07:26:26.
Catharine Roth (coding) on 8 August 2013@00:39:08.

Headword: Aboulei
Adler number: alpha,60
Translated headword: inconsiderately, unintentionally
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] without consideration, mindlessly, ignorantly.[1]
"Though he certainly had not guessed the king's opinion, he accomplished it quite unintentionally."[2]
Greek Original:
Aboulei: aboulôs, aphronôs, amathôs. ho de ou sphodra stochazomenos tês tou basileôs gnômês aboulotata diepraxato.
Notes:
The headword adverb, noted for its form by grammarians, is presumably extracted from somewhere (other than the quotation given).
[1] cf. generally alpha 64.
[2] Polybius fr. 92 Büttner-Wobst. The quotation employs the superlative form of the adverb (a)boulo/tata) rendered here by 'quite unintentionally'. Although accepting the fragment himself, Büttner-Wobst notes that Dindorf maintained that this fragment cannot be genuinely Polybian, because Polybius does not use the verb diapra/casqai, except in a positive context (p. 527).
Reference:
T. Büttner-Wobst, ed., Polybii Historiae, vol. IV, (Leipzig 1904)
Keywords: biography; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; ethics; historiography; history
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:11:52.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified headword, translation and note, added keywords, set status) on 30 January 2001@22:33:11.
David Whitehead (added note; cosmetics) on 23 April 2002@09:17:38.
Catharine Roth (cosmetic) on 23 April 2002@11:16:43.
David Whitehead (added primary note and another hw option; more keywords; cosmetics) on 19 December 2011@08:33:31.
David Whitehead (expanded primary note; cosmetics) on 2 April 2015@10:32:52.
Ronald Allen (added bibliography, supplemented n.2) on 25 April 2018@22:49:34.
Ronald Allen (cosmeticule (bibliography)) on 4 June 2018@23:45:53.

Headword: Aboulein
Adler number: alpha,61
Translated headword: to be unwilling
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] not to wish, or not to resolve. Plato [sc. uses the word].[1]
Greek Original:
Aboulein: mê boulesthai, ê mê bouleuesthai. Platôn.
Notes:
Same entry in other lexica; references at Photius alpha45 Theodoridis.
[1] Plato, Republic 4.437C (web address 1 below). Plato may have coined the verb for this passage.
Associated internet address:
Web address 1
Keywords: definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; philosophy
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:21:47.
Vetted by:
David Whitehead (modified headword and translation; added note and keyword) on 22 September 2000@03:03:59.
William Hutton (Cosmetics, added keyword) on 30 January 2001@22:35:25.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 15 August 2007@09:40:08.
Jennifer Benedict (added link) on 24 March 2008@18:22:22.
David Whitehead (tweaks) on 19 December 2011@08:36:18.
David Whitehead on 16 August 2013@06:51:19.
Catharine Roth (expanded note) on 18 March 2024@23:38:57.

Headword: Habrais
Adler number: alpha,73
Translated headword: delicate
Vetting Status: high
Translation:
[Meaning] gentle, dainty.[1] Aelian [writes]: "them placing [half-beams] upon very delicate couches and mattresses adorned with some magnificent weaving."[2]
Greek Original:
Habrais: hapalais, trupherais. Ailianos: epi klinais mala habrais kai strômnais huphei tini huperêphanôi kekosmêmenais epithentas.
Notes:
cf. generally alpha 70.
[1] The headword is dative plural feminine of this adjective, presumably extracted from the quotation given.
[2] A truncated version of Aelian fr. 53h Domingo-Forasté (50 Hercher); more fully at delta 75, and see also upsilon 290.
Keywords: daily life; definition; dialects, grammar, and etymology; trade and manufacture
Translated by: Anne Mahoney on 26 August 1998@19:29:17.
Vetted by:
William Hutton (Modified translation, added keyword, set status) on 31 January 2001@13:01:14.
David Whitehead (augmented notes; cosmetics) on 1 February 2001@03:53:15.
David Whitehead (augmented notes and keywords) on 19 December 2011@09:25:52.
Catharine Roth (updated reference) on 28 January 2012@18:56:48.
David Whitehead (another x-ref; cosmetics) on 17 January 2014@04:28:35.
Catharine Roth (tweaked note) on 27 March 2024@00:57:06.

Headword: Abrettênê
Adler number: alpha,75
Translated headword: Abrettene
Vetting Status: high
Translation:

Timeout after 20 seconds; further results omitted.